living_primates[1] - Our Place in Nature The living...

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1 Our Place in Nature: The living primates I. Why study primates A. Primates are our closest living relations B. Primates provide comparative behavioral data II. What is a primate? III. Primate biogeography IV. Who are the primates? A Taxonomy B. Prosimians C. Anthropoids 1. Differences between prosimians and anthropoids 2. New World monkeys 3. Old World monkeys 4. Apes 5. Evolutionary relationships between humans and apes Why study primates? Primates are our closest living relatives and provide a standard of reference to compare ourselves. Primates provide comparative behavioral information to use in reconstructing early human behavior. Similarities between species: convergent evolution The wings of bats, birds, and insects The comparative method male mating competition sexual dimorphism non-monogamous mating
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Sexual dimorphism in early hominids Differences between species Differences between chimps and humans and the changes during human evolution What is a primate? Grasping hands
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living_primates[1] - Our Place in Nature The living...

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