COMM 4510 - Midterm 2

COMM 4510 - Midterm 2 - Chapter 5 Three Types of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 Three Types of Territories 1. Primary Territory Belongs to individual/family exclusively Central to their daily functioning Protected from intruders - Ex: Home, Car, Bike, Wallet, Personal Belongings, etc. 2. Secondary Territory Public/private boundary is blurred Available to a small group of people who share it Will be defended against outsiders Conflicts may emerge over use - Ex: Shared House w/ Roommates, Classroom, TV Remote 3. Public Territory Available to the public temporarily Encroachments by others more likely Will be defended using territorial markers - Ex: Table at UMC, Seat on bus, Place in line Three types of territorial encroachment 1. Violation Unwarranted use of or intrusion on another person’s territory - Ex: Using someone’s personal items - Ex2: Staring at someone too long 2. Invasion Permanent occupation or taking of another person’s territory - Ex: Putting a fence or trees on your neighbor’s property - Ex2: Roommate takes sweater and says it is hers 3. Contamination Defiling another person’s territory, often leaving behind evidence - Ex: Evidence of previous occupant in hotel room
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
- Ex2: Someone leaves a mess in your room/home The intensity of our reaction varies: Who violated the territory? Why the territory was violated? What type of territory was it? How was the territory violated? How long did the violation last? Are future violations expected? Where did the violation occur? Defense of Territories 1. Prevention Physical objects - Ex: Fences, Locks, Name tags, Territorial markers 2. Reaction Evaluate whether positive or negative ~ If positive, reciprocate behavior ~ If negative, take defensive action - Ex: Psychological arousal, Fight, Flight, Nonverbal responses (dirty looks, frowning) The Russo Study 1. Female seated at library table 2. Male either Moved chair closer and sat next to female Sat in chair across from female 3. Female departed quickest when chair came within 1 foot of them (70%) * Males react more strongly to frontal invasion ** Females react more strongly to adjacent invasion The Calhoun Study 1. Behavioral Sink = area or receptacle where gross distortions of behavior occur due to overcrowding 150 Norway rats put in ¼ acre pen and allowed to overpopulate for 3 generations Results:
Background image of page 2
- Some withdrew from social contact, others became promiscuous - Female nest building became sloppy or nonexistent - Rat litters became mixed up or were eaten by males - Dominant males fought over eating bins and ran around in packs - Pregnant rats miscarried and only ¼ of 558 newborn rats survived - Aggressive behavior overall increased significantly Same results in humans - Not clear as people have developed coping mechanisms for overcrowding Monkey coping mechanisms to overcrowding (Weiss study) - Mutual grooming - Rapid reconciliation after a fight - Use of facial expressions to avoid trouble Density = the number of people per unit of space
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course COMM 4510 taught by Professor Cambell during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

Page1 / 11

COMM 4510 - Midterm 2 - Chapter 5 Three Types of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online