RLS disorder

RLS disorder - Restless Leg Syndrome 1 Restless Leg...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Restless Leg Syndrome 1 Restless Leg Syndrome Psychology 111 Dr. Woodward November 30, 2006
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Restless Leg Syndrome 2 Restless Leg Syndrome As defined by dictionary.com, a sleep disorder is nothing more than a disturbance of the normal sleep pattern (dictionary.com). One sleep disorder that until recently hasn’t received much attention is restless leg syndrome. “Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations in the legs and an uncontrollable urge to move when at rest in an effort to relieve these feelings” (Office of Communications and Public Liaison, 2001). Although, many people believe that the disease isn’t serious, it is. It affects approximately ten percent of the population, but because of its common misdiagnosis and patients fear that it won’t be taken seriously, many more people are assumed to have the disorder. This disorder must be taken seriously, but for that to happen people must first be informed about RLS. When RLS is as well known as other sleep disorders like sleep apnea or insomnia, those who have RLS won’t fear confronting the disease and getting it treated. Any one can get RLS and as many as 1 in 10 Americans currently have the disorder. “The condition is known to run in families, and it can affect men and women of any age. Symptoms tend to become more troublesome as people get older, which is why most people aren't diagnosed until middle age” (1997). Although both men and women have the disorder, there are actually a slightly higher percentage of women who have restless leg syndrome. How do you know if you have RLS? The symptoms of restless leg syndrome are clear. People with RLS feel uncomfortable sensations, such as tingling, creeping, or pulling, in their legs, mainly when sitting or resting. “These sensations usually occur deep
Background image of page 2
Restless Leg Syndrome 3 inside the leg, between the knee and ankle; more rarely, they occur in the feet, thighs,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course PSYC 111 taught by Professor James during the Fall '06 term at CofC.

Page1 / 6

RLS disorder - Restless Leg Syndrome 1 Restless Leg...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online