Social_Control_and_Emotions.pdf - Social Control and Emotions Jonathan Turner University of California\u2013Riverside This is the first article in Symbolic

Social_Control_and_Emotions.pdf - Social Control and...

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Symbolic Interaction , Vol. 28, Issue 4, pp. 475–485, ISSN 0195-6086, electronic ISSN 1533-8665. © 2006 by the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. All rights reserved. Please direct all re- quests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press’s Rights and Permissions website, at . Direct all correspondence to Jonathan Turner, Department of Sociology, Watkins Hall 2140, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521; e-mail : [email protected] Social Control and Emotions Jonathan Turner University of California–Riverside This is the first article in Symbolic Interaction ’s symposium in tribute to Tamotsu (Tom) Shibutani (1920–2004). The author, a student in Shibutani’s graduate course on social control, discusses his teacher’s ideas and their evolution into his own. The article provides ample basis for the author’s observation: a scholar’s contribution can be measured not only by the cumulative corpus of his or her published work, but also by the influence that this individual has had on the work of others. For many years, Tamotsu Shibutani taught a graduate course on social control. As a senior in a still rather small department of sociology at Santa Barbara, I was allowed to enroll in this course because I had run out of undergraduate courses to take. The reading list for this course included many articles and books, but the central texts were George Herbert Mead’s Mind, Self, and Society (1934), the first portions of Mead’s The Philosophy of the Act (1938), and Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams (1900). As I have moved back into microsociology over the last decade, the debt that I owe Tamotsu Shibutani has become ever more evident to me, a real- ization that led me to dedicate my recent book, Face-to-Face: Toward a Sociological Theory of Interpersonal Behavior (Turner 2002), to Professor Shibutani. In this short memorial to the legacy of Tamotsu Shibutani, I will sketch out the underlying argument that was contained in this seminal course. Much of what I say here is an extension of the message that Shibutani communicated in his quiet and indirect style, but one can also find elements of my argument in Shibutani’s written work. A scholar’s contribution can be measured not only by the cumulative corpus of his or her published work, but also by the influence that this individual has had on the work of others. Because Shibutani published relatively little—like G. H. Mead— much of his legacy lives on through the inspiration that he gave others. Other com- mentators (e.g., Lauer and Handel 1977) emphasize Shibutani’s emphasis on social control as a kind of master process, but I hope to introduce ideas that Shibutani had not fully developed but that have influenced me and others in our own efforts to grapple with the microbasis of social order.
476 Symbolic Interaction Volume 28, Number 4, 2005 THE CYBERNETIC MODEL OF MOTIVATION In the 1960s, General Systems Theory became for a brief period a hot area of in- quiry in sociology and other social science disciplines. The idea was that with a gen-

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