Copy of Early Women's Rights Part 1 - Early Women’s Rights...

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Early Women’s Rights MovementAnalysisObjectiveWhat were the arguments for and against women participating intheabolitionist movement? How did the abolitionist movementlead to the early women’s rights movement?Brain Dump: Read the historical context on the women’s rights movement in the boxbelow.When you are done, answer the two analysis questions that follow.Historical Context: Abolition Movement & Women’s Rights MovementThe abolitionist movement enabled women to carve out a place in the public sphere.Womenattended anti-slavery meetings and circulated petitions to Congress.Most prominent duringthe 1830’s were Angelina and Sarah Grimke, the daughters of a South Carolina slave owner.The women had been converted to Quakerism and abolitionism while visiting Philadelphia.They began to deliver popular lectures that offered a scathing condemnation of slavery fromthe perspective of those who had witnessed it.The sight of women lecturing in public tomixed female and male audiences and taking part in public debate on political questionsaroused considerable criticism.- Eric FonerVoices of Freedom (Volume one, Third Edition - 2011).Analysis Questions:1)Analysis:Historian Bill Bigelow once wrote that the ”...abolition movement seeded themovement for women’s rights in the United States.”How could the experiences ofAngelina and Sarah Grimke support Bigelow’s claim about the relationship between the

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Term
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Atlantic Slave Trade, American Civil War, Abolitionism, Women s Rights Movement, Primary Source Document Analysis, Abolition Movement Women s Rights Movement

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