Lecture 13sf - Line Spectra of Atoms Ordinary light...

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Line Spectra of Atoms Ordinary light consists of all wavelengths from 700 nm to 400 nm (red through violet) and has no particular color. It is sometimes called “white light.” White light can be separated into its range of colors using a prism, which then shows the spectral range from red through violet. This range is continuous, with a gradual merging of the colors. The emission spectrum from excited atoms looks different. When examined with a prism, there is no continuity of colors, but rather a series of distinct lines of varying wavelengths and colors. Each atom has its own particular pattern (emission spectrum). The hydrogen spectrum has a series of lines with wavelengths: 656.3 nm red 486.1 nm blue-green 434.0 nm violet 410.1 nm violet 397.0 nm UV 388.9 nm UV 383.5 nm UV 434.1nm 486.0 nm 656.3 nm
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This pattern was first explained by Neils Bohr. In the Bohr model of the atom, an electron with charge -e is rotating in a circle of radius r around Z protons (Z = atomic number) with charge +Ze. r = radius of circle
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Lecture 13sf - Line Spectra of Atoms Ordinary light...

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