Trueman Chap3

Trueman Chap3 - Chapter 3 Biological Psychology THESE NOTES...

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Chapter 3 Biological Psychology THESE NOTES ARE NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR READING THE TEXT OR COMING TO CLASS Biological Psychology In this chapter we will examine: What are the components of the nervous system? How does the brain create mental processes and behavior? “What we understand least is why brain activity produces
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experience at all.” -- James W. Kalat Module 3.1 The Nervous System and Behavior Measuring Brain Activity Methods for looking at and mapping the brain include: Electroencephalographs and Magnetoencephalographs (EEGs and MEGs) record electrical and magnetic activity in the brain. These readouts do not allow the viewing of brain activity. Measuring Brain Activity Methods for looking at and mapping the brain include: Positron emission tomography (PET) provides
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a high-resolution picture of brain activity using radioactivity from chemicals injected into the bloodstream. The color of the image indicates the level of activity: red areas are most active, followed by yellow, green, and blue for the least active areas. Measuring Brain Activity Methods for looking at and mapping the brain include: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) uses magnetic detectors outside the head to measure the amounts of hemoglobin and oxygen in different areas
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of the brain. Highly active areas of the brain appear to use more oxygen in fMRI images. The Major Divisions of the Nervous System The central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system The central nervous system consists of the brain and the spinal cord. The central nervous system communicates with the rest of the body via the peripheral nervous system. Figure 3.4 Figure 3.4 The nervous system has two major divisions: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. Each of these has major subdivisions, as shown.
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The Major Divisions of the Nervous System The central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system The peripheral nervous system is composed of bundles of axons between the spinal cord and the rest of the body. There are two sets of subdivisions of the peripheral nervous system. The Peripheral Nervous System The somatic nervous system and autonomic nervous system The somatic nervous system is made up of the peripheral nerves that communicate with the skin and muscles. The autonomic nervous
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system controls the involuntary actions of the heart, stomach, and other organs. The Central Nervous System Embryological development During the embryonic stage, the vertebrate nervous system forms out of a simple tube with three lumps: The forebrain that becomes the cerebral cortex and other higher structures. The midbrain and hindbrain
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Trueman Chap3 - Chapter 3 Biological Psychology THESE NOTES...

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