Marketing_cultural_tourism_in_Europe.pdf - Marketing cultural tourism in Europe Richards G and Bonink C(1995 Marketing cultural tourism in Europe

Marketing_cultural_tourism_in_Europe.pdf - Marketing...

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Marketing cultural tourism in Europe Richards, G. and Bonink, C. (1995) Marketing cultural tourism in Europe. Journal of Vacation Marketing 1, 172-180. In the absence of definitions, measuring the significance and growth of cultural tourism becomes problematic. In an attempt to tackle this issue, the European Association for Tourism and Leisure Education (ATLAS) initiated a study funded by DGXXIII of the European Commission to define and monitor cultural tourism in Europe. The ATLAS Cultural Tourism Project attempted to solve the problem by developing two definitions - a narrow, technical definition to aid measurement, and a wider, conceptual definition to encapsulate the broader meaning of cultural tourism. These definitions have been refined during the course of the project, and are currently encapsulated as: Technical definition: All movements of persons to specific cultural attractions, such as museums, heritage sites, artistic performances and festivals outside their normal place of residence. Conceptual definition: The movement of persons to cultural manifestations away from their normal place of residence, with the intention to gather new information and experiences to satisfy their cultural needs. THE CULTURAL TOURISM MARKET An important aim of the ATLAS Cultural Tourism Project was to measure the demand for and the supply of cultural attractions across Europe. Visitor surveys were conducted with 6,500 visitors to 26 cultural attractions across the EC, and an inventory of cultural attractions and attendance figures was compiled. Over 60 per cent of visitors interviewed at major cultural sites could be classified as international tourists, and a further 25 per cent as domestic tourists. When asked about their previous holiday taking, over 19 per cent of visitors indicated that they had taken what they defined as a ’cultural holiday’ in the last 12 months. These specific cultural tourists tended to be more highly educated, take more holidays, visit more cultural attractions on holiday, and were more likely to be employed in the cultural industries than other visitors. High levels of cultural consumption on holiday were also matched by frequent cultural attraction attendance at home. Cultural tourists therefore appear to exhibit a high degree of continuity between everyday cultural consumption and their tourist behaviour. There are some discontinuities of cultural consumption between home and tourist environments, however. Notably, there is a distinction between the ’heritage’ and ’arts’ components of cultural tourism. Cultural tourists appear to visit far more heritage than arts attractions when away from home. In their normal place of residence, arts performances become a far more important activity. There are a number of reasons for this, including the limited information available to tourists, the language-based nature of arts performance, but it may also reflect the increasingly global availability of visual and performing arts. ’ The latest phase of the ATLAS research
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