Serway_PSE_quick_ch13

Serway_PSE_quick_ch13 - Physics for Scientists and...

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Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 6e Chapter 13 - Universal Gravitation
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The Moon remains in its orbit around the Earth rather than falling to the Earth because 1 2 3 4 5 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 1. it is outside of the gravitational influence of the Earth 2. it is in balance with the gravitational forces from the Sun and other planets 3. the net force on the Moon is zero 4. none of these 5. all of these
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The gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the Moon provides a net force that causes the Moon’s centripetal acceleration.
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A planet has two moons of equal mass. Moon 1 is in a circular orbit of radius r . Moon 2 is in a circular orbit of radius 2 r . The magnitude of the gravitational force exerted by the planet on Moon 2 is 1 2 3 4 5 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 1. four times as large as that on Moon 1 2. twice as large as that on Moon 1 3. equal to that on Moon 1 4. half as large as that on Moon 1 5. one fourth as large as that on Moon 1
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The gravitational force follows an inverse-square behavior, so doubling the distance causes the force to be one fourth as large.
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Superman stands on top of a very tall mountain and throws a baseball horizontally with a speed such that the baseball goes into a circular orbit around the Earth. While the baseball is in orbit, the acceleration of the
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2010 for the course PHYS 200 taught by Professor Davies during the Spring '08 term at Roger Williams.

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Serway_PSE_quick_ch13 - Physics for Scientists and...

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