Serway_PSE_quick_ch38

Serway_PSE_quick_ch38 - Physics for Scientists and...

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Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 6e Chapter 38 - Diffraction Patterns and Polarization
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Suppose the slit width in the figure below is made half as wide. The central bright fringe 1 2 3 33% 33% 33% 1 2 3 4 5 1. becomes wider 2. remains the same 3. becomes narrower
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Equation 38.1 shows that a decrease in a results in an increase in the angles at which the dark fringes appear.
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If a classroom door is open slightly, you can hear sounds coming from the hallway. Yet you cannot see what is happening in the hallway. Why is there this difference? 1 2 3 4 25% 25% 25% 25% 1 2 3 4 5 1. Light waves do not diffract through the single slit of the open doorway. 2. Sound waves can pass through the walls, but light waves cannot. 3. The open door is a small slit for sound waves, but a large slit for light waves. 4. The open door is a large slit for sound waves, but a small slit for light waves.
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The space between the slightly open door and the doorframe acts as a single slit. Sound waves have wavelengths that are larger than the opening and so are diffracted and spread throughout the room you are in. Because light wavelengths are much smaller than the slit width, they experience negligible diffraction. As a result, you must have a direct line of sight to detect the light waves.
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Consider the central peak in the diffraction envelope in the figure of question 3. Suppose the wavelength of the light is
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2010 for the course PHYS 200 taught by Professor Davies during the Spring '08 term at Roger Williams.

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Serway_PSE_quick_ch38 - Physics for Scientists and...

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