fwaris_whatmakesaqualityeducationalapproach_012719.docx - What Makes A Quality Educational Approach What Makes a Quality Educational Approach Fayeza F

fwaris_whatmakesaqualityeducationalapproach_012719.docx -...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 10 pages.

What Makes A Quality Educational Approach ? 1 What Makes a Quality Educational Approach? Fayeza F. Waris Rasmussen College Author’s Note This paper is being submitted on January 27, 2019, for Victoria Snyder’s EEC3318 Section 05 Intentional Teaching Practices - Online Plus - 2019 Winter Quarter Term 1 course
Image of page 1
What Makes A Quality Educational Approach ? 2 What Makes a Quality Educational Approach? In the present era of technological revolution, the globalization is much greater than ever before. The society has become a melting pot where the presence of diversity is visible everywhere including in the classroom environment. The adopted educational approach highly influences the tone of today ’s classrooms. Among many early childhood educational approaches “Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia are three progressive approaches to early childhood education that appear to be growing in influence in North America” (Edwards, 2002, p. 4). All these three approaches share many similar attributes but have their distinct idealism. Part 1 Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), a maverick Austrian scientist and philosophical thinker was the founder of Waldorf education. During World War I, he was invited to Waldorf-Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart, Germany to establish a school raising awareness for a just and peaceful society incorporating coeducation, open admission of children from all background, comprehensive, and free of external control. The effort was to bring liberation to the field of education (Edwards, 2002, p. 3). According to this theory, children from birth to age 7, learn through imitating and doing. Imagination is the active ‘work’ of children that they use to mature in all developmental domains. “The educational focus is on bodily exploration, constructive and creative play, and oral (never written) language, story, and song” (Edwards, 2002, p. 5). The Montessori approach was established by Maria Montessori (1870-1952), who was the first woman physician in Italy. Her initiation was rooted in working with children with disabilities when she started her Casa dei Bambini (Children’s House) in 1907 for children ages 4 through 7 in the slums of Rome. Initially, her movement was condemned by the Fascist regime in Italy making her left the country, but soon the Montessori approach became popular in other
Image of page 2
What Makes A Quality Educational Approach ? 3 countries and “in the 1950s, American educator Nancy Rambush led a movement of renewal, and Montessori education spread as an independent school movement (Loeffler, 1992) (Edwards, 2002, p. 4).” In this approach, from birth to age 6, children use their sensory, physiological movement, order, and freedom to engage in activities that are carefully planned by teachers. “The Montessori curriculum is highly individualized but with scope and sequence and clear-cut domains” (Edwards, 2002, p. 6). Montessori classroom usually has more than one teacher, and the teachers introduce and demonstrate new learning content when children indicate readiness to move advance in the sequence of self-correcting across different academic disciplines.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 10 pages?

  • Spring '17
  • Reggio Emilia approach, Waldorf education, Reggio classroom

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture