Unit 8 Info - Unit 8 1. Introduction (Modified 29 Aug 2008)...

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Unformatted text preview: Unit 8 1. Introduction (Modified 29 Aug 2008) Welcome to Unit 8 - Coasts & Sea-level Changes (Cape Cod & Acadia) Photo Source: http://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/portam/cod.html John Collier. Hauling in a Cod Aboard a Portuguese Fishing Dory, Spring 1942. Photograph. Prints and Photographs Division, U.S. Office of War Information, LC-USW-3-2175-E (13). Library of Congress. "The cod has been an extremely valuable resource for several centuries in Massachusetts. Its extensive use as a food dates back to the earliest period of European settlement in coastal New England. In colonial times, it was deemed so important that in 1693 the General Court of the Massachusetts Nay Colony ordered that farmers could no longer use cod as fertilizer. This action was one of the first recorded attempts at natural resource conservation and management on this continent. Although one of the earliest fisheries resources to be broadly utilized after European settlement in New England, cod populations along the US coast proved to be very resilient. Cod apparently withstood more than 3 centuries of harvest without displaying major, long-term regulations in abundance. However, mid-twentieth century advances in fishing technology and the introduction into the northwest Atlantic of distant-water foreign fishing fleets during the late 1950's led to a period of reduced abundance and major annual fluctuations in population size. During the mid-1980s commercial vessels captured mostly 3 to 5 year old fish, indication that few larger, older individuals remain along the North American coast." From the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (emphasis added) Will Cape Cod be there in the future? Looking out a few millennia, the answer is probably "no." Beaches, like rivers, are interplays of water and sediment. Sand is supplied, and sand is lost. Interrupt this process, and the coast must change. And Cape Cod far in the future is likely to be the new Georges Bank, an underwater place that could be home to great masses of fish, if we leave the fish to get along and get it on. Unit 8 1. Textbook 8.1: Cape Cod (Modified 22 Oct 2008) Coasts and Cape Cod The author, Dr. Alley, is a lucky fellow. Through a fortuitous sequence of events, which involved marrying the right woman who had the right grandfather who was related to some people who have roots in the right place and worked to preserve those roots, our family has been able to occupy a room in the smallest of three houses in a compound in Eastham on Cape Cod for a couple of weeks during many summers. The land now belongs to the National Park Service as part of the Cape Cod National Seashore, but the houses were grandfathered and remain in the extended family. The bicycle trail to the Coast Guard Beach crosses the driveway, the Salt Pond Visitor Center is just around the corner, and the boat house faces Salt Pond Creek that opens on the Nauset Marsh. Cape Cod is a glacial moraine. The part that attaches to the mainland marks the end...
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Unit 8 Info - Unit 8 1. Introduction (Modified 29 Aug 2008)...

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