Lectures 18 - Lectures 18 Protein Metabolism Amino Acid...

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Lectures 18 Protein Metabolism Amino Acid Metabolism in the Body
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Most amino acids are catabolized (broken down) by the liver. In order for amino acids to be used for functions other than protein or nitrogen containing compound synthesis, the nitrogen group must first be removed. The nitrogen group is removed by either deamination or transamination which yields the amino acid’s carbon skeleton. The carbon skeleton can then be used by the liver for energy (ATP) production, gluconeogenesis. The liver gets approximately 50% of its energy from amino acid catablism. The amino group can be used for urea synthesis. Deamination – The removal of a nitrogen (amino) group. The amino group is not transferred to another compound. Transamination – The removal of a nitrogen (amino) group. However, the amino group is transferred to another compound.
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Deamination
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Transamination Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) are the most active aminotransferases
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2010 for the course NTR 342 taught by Professor Tillman during the Fall '09 term at University of Texas.

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Lectures 18 - Lectures 18 Protein Metabolism Amino Acid...

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