EED222L1CTA - 19th Century Early Special Education Programs 1954 Brown v Board of Education 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act(ESEA Project

EED222L1CTA - 19th Century Early Special Education Programs...

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19th Century: Early Special Education Programs 1954: Brown v. Board of Education 1965: Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) & Project Head Start 1965: Bureau of Education for the Handicapped 1966: Handicapped Children’s Early Education Act (HCEEP) 1970: Education of the Handicapped Act 1971: Pennsylvania Association of Retarded Children v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1972: Mills v. Board of Education of District of Columbia, Congressional Investigation 1972: Head Start PL 92-424-Economic Opportunity Act Amendments 1974: Education Amendments 1975: Education for All Handicapped Children (EHA) 1985: The Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments 1986: The Education of the Handicapped Children’s Act Amendments 1990: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 1990: Head Start Expansion and Quality Improvement Act. 1991: The Early Childhood Amendments to Act 1994: The Technology Act 1997: The Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1997 2001: No Child Left Behind 2004: Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act 2015: Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) The first special education programs were around during the 19th century, but they were for children who were considered “at risk”. Instead of a general education, these children’s education were supplemented with manual training so that they could live a somewhat normal life working and “moral training” so that they could live peacefully in society. Early special education programs gradually increased from the 19th century to the 20th century and by 1940, programs for children with specific learning disabilities became more common. However, good special education programs were rare and difficult to access for most children with disabilities. The Brown v. Board of Education case was a landmark case in education for both civil rights and disability rights. I believe because of this case being about the effects of segregating children of color and the decision that
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  • Fall '16
  • Jennifer Matthews
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Board of Education, Bureau of Education, Board of Education of District of Columbia, Early Special Education Programs

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