APC_100_GI_2010_powerpoint_2

APC_100_GI_2010_powerpoint_2 - Duodenum Duodenum (name from...

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Duodenum Duodenum (name from 12 fingerbreadths in human) receives material from stomach receives secretions of exocrine pancreas receives bile duodenal papillae - opening for bile duct and for pancreatic ducts Secretions into duodenum amylase lipase proteolytic enzymes
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Duodenum Duodenum (genesis of the name is from 12 human hand widths) The duodenum receives material from stomach The exocrine pancreas secretes enzymes via the pancreatic duct into the duodenum Lipases, proteases, and amylases Bile is secreted from the gallbladder and enters in the duodenum via the bile duct Hemoglobin is broken down in the liver and it, along with other metabolites, are stored in the gallbladder as bile. Bile helps to emulsify fats. Both the bile duct and the primary pancreatic duct - open into the cranial pat of the duodenum via a common duodenal papillae. Some animals have a second (accessory) pancreatic duct that empties distally of the primary duct
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Structure of the Duodenum 1. Tunica adventitia Mesentery Peritoneum 2. Tunica muscularis Circular layer (inner) Longitudinal layer (outer) 3. Submucosa Vessels Nerves Lymphatics Glands 4. Tunica mucosa Epithelium Lamina propria muscularis mucosa
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Small and Large Intestine of the Dog Rectum Descending colon Transverse colon Ascending colon Cecum Ileum Duodenum Jejunum
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Histology of the Duodenum The duodenum and the jejunum look very similar except that the jejunum has longer villi and has fewer submucosal glands. Duodenal (Brunner’s) glands are characteristic of the duodenum; they produce bicarbonate to increase pH.
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Small and Large Intestine of the Dog Rectum Descending colon Transverse colon Ascending colon Cecum Ileum Duodenum Jejunum
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Histology of the Jejunum Villi tend to be longer than in other areas of the intestine Aggregated lymphatic nodules called Peyer’s Patches Intestinal glands in lamina propria are numerous and called “crypts of Lieberkuhn”. Produces a variety of digestive enzymes These glands empty into the intervillous spaces Submucosa reduced relative to duodenum
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Small and Large Intestine of the Dog Rectum Descending colon Transverse colon Ascending colon Cecum Ileum Duodenum Jejunum
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Histology of the Ileum Smaller, less extensive villi Fewer glands in the lamina propria & in the submucosa Muscularis mucosa is broken up Very extensive lymphoid tissue Aggregations of lymphoid tissue are called Peyers Patches Lymphoid tissue occurs throughout the intestine; but is particularly apparent in the jejunum and ileum. It deals with invading bacteria and foreign antigens.
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Small and Large Intestine of the Dog Rectum Descending colon Transverse colon Ascending colon Cecum Ileum Duodenum Jejunum
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The cecum is a transition structure between the small intestine and the large intestine. The large intestine consists of the cecum,
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2010 for the course NPB NPB123 taught by Professor Meyers during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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APC_100_GI_2010_powerpoint_2 - Duodenum Duodenum (name from...

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