Lec4IntegumentIII

Lec4IntegumentIII - The Integumentary System III Announcements You will not be responsible for slides not covered in my lectures I will post

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The Integumentary System III
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Announcements • You will not be responsible for slides not covered in my lectures. • I will post student questions/responses as a separate file in Resources folder. You are not responsible for this, just FYI.
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Blood Supply The primary function of the cutaneous vascular supply is thermoregulation The secondary function of the cutaneous vascular supply is nutrition of skin and appendages
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Runs along the papillary layer At boundary of papillary and reticular layer Present in hypodermis or subcutaneous adipose tissue Subpapillary plexus gives rise to single loops of capillaries within each dermal papilla Venous blood of subpapillary drains into veins of the cutaneous plexus Subcutaneous and cutaneous nourish hypodermis, sweat glands, and hair follicles 3 interconnected vascular networks in the skin: Subpapillary Cutaneous Subcutaneous
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Arteriovenous anastomosis(shunts) between arterial and venous circulation bypass the capillary network, common in extremities (hands, feet, ear, lips, nose) and play a role in thermoregulation These vascular shunts are under autonomic nervous system control to restrict blood flow, can reduce heat loss In some areas (i.e. the face) cutaneous blood circulation can be controlled by emotional state
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Sensory Receptors The skin and subcutaneous tissue contains receptors that respond to stimuli such as touch, pressure, heat, cold, and pain
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Sensory Receptors Sensory receptors can be classified based on the type of stimulus to which the receptor responds: 1. Mechanoreceptor Responds to mechanical deformation of the tissue or receptor itself 2. Thermoreceptors Responds to warmth or cold 3. Nociceptors Respond to painful stimuli
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Sensory Receptors (continued) 1. Naked nerve endings Lacks myelin covering, responds to pressure, pain and temperature stimuli
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2010 for the course NPB NPB123 taught by Professor Meyers during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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Lec4IntegumentIII - The Integumentary System III Announcements You will not be responsible for slides not covered in my lectures I will post

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