Lecture 4 - I. II. Modeling Communication A. Modeling...

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I. Modeling Communication A. Modeling Communication 1. What is a model? a. Representation, type of picture of what it is you are trying to study. b. Abstract representation of “the real thing” 2. Why model communication? a. Help make predictions about behavior. b. You can show things on a smaller scale, it helps visualize & organize info clearly. c. To suggest new ideas. 3. A good model ideally should include: a. Primary components of communication b. Important characteristics of communication c. How everything fits together. (what is connected to what, what causes what etc.) 4. But, most models limit their focus a. Some models will work better for interpersonal than media, etc. “I want this and not that.” B. Primary Components of Communication 1. People (participants) a. Sources and receivers (constantly sending and receiving messages at the same time) 2. Message a. Verbal/nonverbal symbols 3. Channel/medium 4. Noise a. Anything that interferes with the communication b. Psychological noise (biases, self-talk etc.) 5. Feedback a. Messages do not just go from source to receiver; messages do come back to the source. 6. Context/setting a. Where you are, who is there, what people are wearing, etc. II.
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Lecture 4 - I. II. Modeling Communication A. Modeling...

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