ch369_f09_photo_1_notes

ch369_f09_photo_1_notes - Last time Finished chapter 12...

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Last time - Finished chapter 12 Oxidative phosphorylation.
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xidative phosphorylation - Overall reaction:
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From the Wikipedia page on oxidative phosphorylation. Inside mitochondria:
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Bacteria don’t have mitochondria. Do they have an ATP synthase like eukaryotes? Yes! In bacteria, a proton gradient can be produced by using an electron transport chain to pump protons into the space between the bacterial cell wall and bacterial plasma membrane.
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Generating ATP while exercising. Muscle activity requires energy (ATP for muscle contraction). Where to get the ATP? The ATP already hanging around in muscles will last approx. 1 or 2 seconds (one weight lift).
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creatine phosphate (or phosphocreatine) creatine phosphate + ADP <=====> creatine + ATP creatine kinase Creatine phosphate in muscle cells can donate phosphate to quickly make more ATP, right in the muscles. This ATP source lasts about another 5 seconds.
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Glycolysis can generate ATP for about another 30 seconds, until too much pyruvate and lactate accumulate. With slower (aerobic) exercise, pyruvate doe not accumulate so fast, and can be taken into the TCA cycle, generating reduced NADH that can be used to make ATP by oxidative phosphorylation.
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Exercise fueled by glycolysis is “ anaerobic ”. Does not require O 2 . To get through a 5K run you need to use oxidative phosphorylation to make enough ATP. This requires O 2 as the final electron acceptor in the electron transport chain. So breathing is required ! Exercise that is powered by oxidative phosphorylation is aerobic” .
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Photosynthesis - Chapter 13
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Photosynthesis Photosynthesis uses the energy of sunlight to convert CO 2 into carbohydrates and other organic molecules that are useful to plants. Plant cells. The little green things are chloroplasts. Chloroplasts - where photosynthesis occurs. chloroplast
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Photosynthesis evolved early in the history of life. Photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) first appeared about 3 billion years ago, producing oxygen (and changing the earth’s atmosphere). 4 x 10 years ago 9 Now first life 3 x 10 years ago 9 2 x 10 years ago 9 1 x 10 years ago 9 Photosynthesi s in cyanobacteria increasing oxygen in atmosphere earth form s
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About 550 million years ago, a cyanobacterium formed a symbiotic relationship with a single-celled eukaryote, and was engulfed by the eukaryote. This event formed the ancestor of
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This note was uploaded on 01/21/2010 for the course CH 369 taught by Professor Kbrowning during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas.

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ch369_f09_photo_1_notes - Last time Finished chapter 12...

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