ch369_f09_repair_notes

ch369_f09_repair_notes - In addition to study questions...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In addition to study questions & practice test, look at notes and book, too! A few practice questions before we start today:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1) Ammonia is generated in deamination reactions, yet is toxic to cells. How do cells quickly dispose of ammonia? Answer #1 Ammonia may be taken up by glutamate to form glutamine: glulatamate + NH 4 + glutamine + P i ATP ADP glutamine synthetase Glutamate is abundant in cells, just for capturing NH 4 +
Background image of page 2
Another good answer: Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase consumes ammonia, in making the carbamoyl phosphate that enters the urea cycle.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(the amine on the a.a. & the carbonyl on the α -keto acid swap places) 2) What reaction does a transaminase catalyze ?
Background image of page 4
3) If you consume excess glutamate, how can you dispose of it in a way that generates some ATP? Answer: A transaminase can remove the amine from glutamate. The resulting α -ketoglutarate can then enter the TCA cycle. transaminase
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Another possible answer: Glutamate can be deaminated, yielding ammonia + α - ketoglutarate. The α -ketoglutarate goes to TCA cycle. The ammonia can be used to make carbamoyl phosphate, which enters the urea cycle. glutamate dehydrogenas e
Background image of page 6
A note about the urea cycle: Urea cycle actually generates a small amount of ATP. Each ammonia that enters the urea cycle results in 1 or 2 ATPs being produced (due to NADH that can be produced from urea cycle intermediates).
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
histones in chromatin. 4) What holds the DNA on to the histones proteins? The histone proteins contain conserved lysines & arginines on their surfaces (with positive charges). These bind to the negatively
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 29

ch369_f09_repair_notes - In addition to study questions...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online