Experiment 7

Experiment 7 - of a centripetal force, and object in...

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Intro Circular motion, motion along a circle, can be uniform with a constant rate of rotation or non uniform with a changing rate of rotation. Circular motion at a constant velocity is an accelerated motion. The acceleration is due to the constant change in direction attributed to circular motion, although the magnitude of the velocity remains the same. The direction that the velocity is pointed is continually changing. The force that causes the change in direction is called a centripetal force, since it’s always directed toward the center of the circle. In the absence
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Unformatted text preview: of a centripetal force, and object in circular motion would resume its original path, tangent to its point on the circle. Calculations 1. N 1 = number of revolutions/t 1 N 1 = 30/16.049 N 1 =1.87 -N 2 = number of revolutions/t 2 N 2 = 30/13.903 N = ( N 1 + N 2 )/2 N= ( 1.87 +2.16 )/2 N= 2.015 N= abs(( N 1-N 2 )/2) N= abs ((1.87-2.16)/2) N=.145 2. (M/L)=(M/L)( L/L) (M/L)=(150/.5)(.0025/.5) (M/L)=1.5 ( N 2 )= N2N ( N 2 )=(2.015)(2(.145)) 3....
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Experiment 7 - of a centripetal force, and object in...

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