Lecture XVIII - Parasitism-mutualism

Lecture XVIII - Parasitism-mutualism - Lecture XVIII...

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Lecture XVIII – Species interaction, Long-term: Parasitism-Mutualism
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Coevolution Term coined by Paul Ehrlich and Peter Raven in 1964 They showed that genera and families of butterflies depended for food on particular phylogenetic groupings of plants Definition: The joint evolution of two or more species in close ecological interaction over time Each species exerts selection pressure on the other.
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Species Interactions (Reiteration) Species interactions divided based on the effect that each has upon the other: Both negative (-,-) – competition Negative and neutral (-,0) or commensalism (+,0) – can relate to other organism (the one that is not being impacted) as environmental factor Negative and positive (+,-) – herbivory, predation, parasitoidism, parasitism Positive and positive (+,+) - mutualism
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Symbioses Predation sometimes leads to long-term, coevolution, however, other relationships are more commonly long-term and often specialized and obligatory These relationships, under the general term of symbiosis (used commonly to refer to mutually positive relationships, but can mean any long-term interactive coexistence) include: Parasitoidism Parasitism Mutualism
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Parasitoidism (Reiteration) Parasitoids are organisms that benefit from another organism while killing it Parasitoidism differs from predation in that parasitoids are highly specialized on their host species In the great majority of cases, the larvae of the parasitoid consumes the host species as it grows, either from the outside (parasitic wasps), or from the inside (ichneumon flies)
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Parasitism
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2010 for the course BIOS 230 taught by Professor Gibbons during the Fall '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lecture XVIII - Parasitism-mutualism - Lecture XVIII...

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