Lecture XX - Community Dynamics

Lecture XX - Community Dynamics - Lecture XIX Community...

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Lecture XIX – Community Dynamics
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Community Succession Following a major disturbance, ecological communities often show predictable and directional change.
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Community Succession Following a major disturbance, ecological communities often show predictable and directional change. This involves turnover among different communities
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Community Succession In many cases, each subsequent stage (“sere”) is more highly structured and consists of longer-lived and larger plant species
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Climax Vegetation In some types of community, particularly eastern deciduous forests, the process, the intermediate communities, as well as the “final” community, are extremely constant
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Climax Vegetation This caused Fredrick E. Clements (1905) to develop his holistic view of communities, which includes the concept of “climax” vegetation or community
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Climax Vegetation A climax community is the community that is expected to invariably develop within ecological time, in a given climate and soil.
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Climax Vegetation A climax community is the community that is expected to invariably develop within ecological time, in a given climate and soil. Climax communities are also the only community expected to exist in a state of equilibrium
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How Communities Form Over Time Communities form through the process of succession Predictable changes in vegetation structure over time
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Succession There are two major types of succession: Primary succession : this develops on substrate previously uninhabited by any vegetation, or which has been scoured clean of any soil and plant life (newly formed islands, receding glaciers, dunes, mudslides, etc.)
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Succession There are two major types of succession: Secondary succession : develops on soil which has undergone a major disturbance, which has killed of the major part of the above-ground vegetation (fire, agricultural clearing, flood)
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Ecological Succession Primary succession Area starts out with no soil layer No pre-existing vegetation Volcanoes, glaciers
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Primary Succession Bare rock Lichens attach Biological acids break down rock Freeze/thaw breaks down rock Wind/rain erode rock
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2010 for the course BIOS 230 taught by Professor Gibbons during the Fall '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lecture XX - Community Dynamics - Lecture XIX Community...

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