Lecture X Phylogenetics human evolution

Lecture X Phylogenetics human evolution - Lecture X Human...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture X –Human Evolution and Phylogenetics
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Ancestry
Background image of page 2
Human Ancestry Humans belong to the Order Primates In this order there are two Suborders: Strepsirrhini: non-tarsier prosimians (pre-monkeys/apes) Haplorrhini: tarsiers, monkeys and apes Tarsier Lemurs Loris Aye-Aye
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Primates General features of primates Large brains Dependence on vision, forward-facing eyes Hand-eye coordination Independent thumb, digits Nails rather than claws Reduced dependence on olfactory system
Background image of page 4
Recent phylogeny of the primates
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Strepsirrhini: non-Tarsier Prosimians and Haplorrhini: Tarsiers Characteristics: Claws Long snout Slightly lateral eyes Generally nocturnal
Background image of page 6
Haplorrhini: Monkeys and Apes Characteristics: Larger relative brain size Flatter face Changes in visual system; diurnal habits
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Platyrrhini: New World Monkeys Characteristics: Arboreal Prehensile tails common Noses are flatter, with side facing nostrils Often nocturnal All dwell in the Americas
Background image of page 8
Catarrhini: Old World Monkeys Characteristics: Arboreal or ground-living All diurnal Tails never prehensile, often lack or small tail Noses narrow, downward pointing nostrils Dwell from Africa to Japan
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hominoidea – Apes This group includes: gibbons, orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans Characteristics: Still larger relative brain size Tailless More upright posture More flexible thumb, wrist, ankle Brachiate
Background image of page 10
Human Origins So, what are the closest “relatives” of humans? Darwin already noted the many similarities between humans and African Apes: Many Features of the skeleton, skull, muscular system Shortened canine teeth Reduced hairiness www.accuracyingenesis.com
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Relationships among Great Apes Prior to the “molecular revolution” in evolutionary biology, a nmber of alternative phylogenies were proposed for humans and other apes:
Background image of page 12
Relationships among Great Apes Modern Molecular techniques place humans, Chimpanzees and Bonobos as the most closely related
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Origins The closest living species to humans are Chimpanzees, Bonobos, and Gorillas This claim is based on genetic evidence: Chen & Li (2001) demonstrated that only a 1.24% difference between human and chimpanzee genomes, and a 1.62% difference between human and gorilla genes… Chen, F.-C. & Li, W.-H. 2001. Genomic divergences between humans and other hominoids and the effective population size of the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 68 : 444-456
Background image of page 14
Phylogeny Modern phylogeny from: . By Wen-Hsiung Li and Matthew A. Saunders, Nature 437: 50-51 (1 September 2005)
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Evolution Kent Hovind
Background image of page 16
So, what is the evolutionary history of Homo sapiens ? Let’s look at historical ideas…
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 65

Lecture X Phylogenetics human evolution - Lecture X Human...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online