Lecture_9 - 17Nov09BioS230lecture#9onCommunities...

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17 Nov 09 BioS 230 lecture # 9 on Communities COMMUNITY STRUCTURE A community is the collection of species that live in the same place. The dimensions of place  are rarely defined but same place implies there are opportunities to interact even if they interact  very little. Use Table 16.1 to calculate the Species richness, Simpson’s D and Shannon’s H for this  community How do you define diversity?  Here are some data from a West Virginia Forest. In this stand two  species make up over 80% of the individuals. The community would be named a Yellow Poplar- Sassafras forest. Another common name for the yellow poplar is the tulip poplar. Diversity  statistics are calculated from this data.  Species Number  of  individual s p i p i ^2 p i lnp i Abundance Rank Yellow  Poplar 122 0.445 0.198252437529 97 0.36025 9 1 Sassafras 107 0.391 0.152498801214 77 0.36719 7 2 Black cherry 12 0.044 0.001918056369 55 0.13700 2 3 Magnolia 11 0.040 0.001611700143 85 0.12907 9 4 Red maple 10 0.036 0.001331983589 96 0.12082 3 5 Red oak 8 0.029 0.000852469497 58 0.10317 3 6 Butternut 1 0.004 0.000013319835 90 0.02048 6 8.5 Hickory  1 0.004 0.000013319835 90 0.02048 6 8.5 Beech 1 0.004 0.000013319835 90 0.02048 6 8.5 Sugar maple 1 0.004 0.000013319835 0.02048 8.5 BioS 230 Fall 2009 Page 1
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90 6 274 0.356518728 1.29947 7 55 Check Species Richness = 10 In community ecology the word dominant is used to describe the most or the couple most  abundant species. Dominance by a single species or suite of similar species – the species  whose absence would most be missed, gives the community its name.  In woodlands the  dominants are always canopy trees, those that have/get access to light first. Food webs – describe the resource/food relationships of species that live in a community. In 
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2010 for the course BIOS 230 taught by Professor Gibbons during the Fall '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lecture_9 - 17Nov09BioS230lecture#9onCommunities...

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