US Immigration & World Refugees

US Immigration & World Refugees - Part 1 US...

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Part 1: US Immigration Part 2: World Refugees
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Gross Migration Net Migration Out & In-Migration (Emigration Areas of Origin and Destination (Source & Host Countries) Migration Rates Migration Interval Streams & Counterstreams Return Migration Differential Migration Internal Migration & International Migration Selectivity of Migration – Age, Marital Status, Gender, Push / Pull Factors Brain Drain
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Primitive Migration Group or Mass Migration Free-individual Migration Restrictive Migration / Quotas Impelled / Forced Migration Economic Migrants Chain Migration Circular Migration Political Migrants / Refugees Environmental Migration / Refugees Social/Gender Migration / Refugees? http://www.usaforunhcr.org/usaforunhcr/uploadedfiles/1951Convention.pdf
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Waves of Immigrant Groups to the United States English, Irish, Scottish (from the British Isles – 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, 1900s) African Slaves (unwilling immigrants – forced from their homelands – 1600s-1700s) Scandinavians, Germans, Poles, Italians… (Northern & Eastern Europeans – 1700s, 1800s, 1900s) Chinese, Japanese, Lebanon, Syrians (late 1800s - early 1900s) Latin America, Asia, Africa (post-1965)
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What’s the Difference between an Immigrant and a Refugee ?
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An immigrant arrives in a host country seeking better economic opportunities Ellis Island, New York
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A refugee feels compelled to leave his/her country of origin because of persecution by the government of that country
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Return Migration: People Emigrating Out of US & Back to Country of Origin
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Source Region of Immigrants to US
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The preference system for visa admissions ( modified 1990 ): Unmarried adult sons and daughters of U.S. citizens Spouses & children & unmarried sons & daughters of permanent resident aliens Married children of U.S. citizens Skilled & unskilled workers in occupations for which there is insufficient labor supply Refugees given conditional entry or adjustment — chiefly people from Applicants not entitled to preceding preferences — i.e., everyone else See also: http://www.foreignborn.com/visas_imm/immigrant_visas/10preference_system.htm#preference
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Chronology of Some Restrictive US Immigration Acts 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act — Barred the entry of any Chinese for 10 years, made permanent in 1904 until it was rescinded in 1943. 1907 Gentlemen's Agreement
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2010 for the course GCU 73578 taught by Professor Larson-keagy during the Fall '09 term at ASU.

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US Immigration & World Refugees - Part 1 US...

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