131106outline2 - Biol. 1311 8/30/06 why hemoglobins...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Biol. 1311 – 8/30/06 – why hemoglobins everywhere? Where we are on the concept map Vitreoscilla and its hemoglobin: Why should it be a surprise that a bacterium has this molecule? Bacterium with scale bar (fig 7-1) Same question for yeast, but with scale bar. Diffusion confusion? Did it describe this? (no eq. fig) Membranes actually get in the way of diffusion but they are unavoidable Still not the answer to why hemoglobin is a surprise in a unicellular organism Fick’s law provides the answer An equation that isn’t about calculations (fig 44.4) A restatement in more general terms J (flux rate) = SA X D ( c)/( x) SA = surface area; D = diffusion coefficient for molecule (=k) ( c)= difference in concentration; ( x) = distance x = D - try not to get confused Diffusion is a random walk phenomenon:Works for short distances Relationship of D and x creates limits. Random walk motion is governed by inverse square relationship: t = x 2 /D For small biologically relevant molecules D leads to a time to move 1μm on the order of a
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/24/2010 for the course BIO 1311 taught by Professor Shinkle during the Fall '06 term at Trinity University.

Page1 / 2

131106outline2 - Biol. 1311 8/30/06 why hemoglobins...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online