BME303_lecture6 - BME303 Intro. to Computing Chapter 3:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BME303 Intro. to Computing Chapter 3: Digital Logic Structures
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
BME303 Intro. to Computing 2 Problem Language Machine (ISA) Architecture Algorithms Micro-architecture Circuits Devices Data Path Memory Storage Elements R-S Latch Gated D latch Register Logic Structures Decoder Mux (multiplexer) Adder Logic Gates NOT OR AND Other gates Transistors Devices, Circuits, … Bottom Up
Background image of page 2
BME303 Intro. to Computing 3 First transistor and beyond First transistor was invented in 1947 by John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley at Bell Laboratories (the three shared a Nobel prize later) Shockley started a semiconductor company in Palo Alto, and staff of folded company invented the integrated circuit (the "chip") and found Intel Corporation By 1960, most computers used transistors for logic , and ferrite cores for memory (Shanghai-born American physicists, An Wang and Way-Dong Woo ) Memory chips (digital circuits) replaced cores in the 1970's Workbench of John Bardeen and Walter Brattain at Bell Laboratories
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
BME303 Intro. to Computing 4 Disclaimer • Not all electronic computers are made from transistors. Electronic logic can be built from – vacuum tubes – magnetic amplifiers, core, bubbles – superconducting cryotrons – superconducting Josephson junctions So, why transistors then … "Had the automobile developed at a pace (equal) to that of the computer during the past twenty years, today a Rolls Royce would cost less than $3.00, get 3 million miles to the gallon, deliver enough power to drive (the ship) the Queen Elizabeth II, and six of them would fit on the head of a pin!"
Background image of page 4
BME303 Intro. to Computing 5 April 1972 Name of Processor: 8008 Clock speed: 200 kHz Number of transistors: 3,500 September 1978 Name of Processor: 8086 Clock speed: 10 MHz Number of transistors: 29,000 February 1982 Name of Processor: 286 Clock speed: 12 MHz Number of transistors: 134,000 October 1985 Name of Processor: 386 Clock speed: 16 MHz Number of transistors: 275,000 April 1989 Name of Processor: 486 Clock speed: 25 MHz Number of transistors: 1,200,000 Intel Processors March 1993 Name of Processor: Pentium Clock speed: 60 MHz Number of transistors: 3.1 million May 1997 Name of Processor: Pentium II Clock speed: 300 MHz Number of transistors: 3.3 million August 1999 Name of Processor: Pentium III Clock speed: 600 MHz Number of transistors: 9.5 million November 2000 Name of Processor: Pentium 4 Clock speed: 1.5 GHz Number of transistors: 42 million Nov 2002 Name of Processor: Pentium 4 Clock speed: 3.0 GHz Number of transistors: 55 million
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
BME303 Intro. to Computing 6 Transistor as a Switch
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/24/2010 for the course BME 303 taught by Professor Ren during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 48

BME303_lecture6 - BME303 Intro. to Computing Chapter 3:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online