A.Double_displacement - Double displacement This is when...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Double displacement : This is when the anions and cations of two different molecules switch places, forming two entirely different compounds. These reactions are in the general form: AB + CD ---> AD + CB One example of a double displacement reaction is the reaction of lead (II) nitrate with potassium iodide to form lead (II) iodide and potassium nitrate: Pb(NO 3 ) 2 + 2 KI ---> PbI 2 + 2 KNO 3 Precipitation is the formation of a solid in a solution during a chemical reaction. When the chemical reaction occurs the solid formed is called the precipitate . This can occur when an insoluble substance, the precipitate , is formed in the solution due to a reaction or when the solution has been supersaturated by a compound. The formation of a precipitate is a sign of a chemical change. In most situations, the solid forms ("falls") out of the solute phase, and sinks to the bottom of the solution (though it will float if it is less dense than the solvent, or form a suspension).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/26/2010 for the course CHEM 1311 taught by Professor Sussanthomas during the Spring '05 term at The University of Texas at San Antonio- San Antonio.

Page1 / 3

A.Double_displacement - Double displacement This is when...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online