E45 - Lab 7 - Uniaxial Test - Engineering 45 Properties of...

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E E n n g g i i n n e e e e r r i i n n g g 4 4 5 5 P P r r o o p p e e r r t t i i e e s s o o f f M M a a t t e e r r i i a a l l s s L L a a b b o o r r a a t t o o r r y y © Copyright 2001 Professor Ronald Gronsky the Arthur C. and Phyllis G. Oppenheimer Chair in Advanced Materials Analysis University of California Berkeley, California 94720-1760
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E 45 2 Lab 7 The Uniaxial Tensile Test Objectives To introduce the basic properties of strength and toughness of materials To standardize the fundamental concepts of mechanical stress and strain To understand the uniaxial tensile test To determine stress-strain curves To observe the microstructure of a fracture surface Overview This experiment provides the student experience with the use of a standard technique for characterizing one of the most important mechanical properties of a metallic alloy. It illustrates the use of stress-strain curves for assessing the performance of materials. Understanding what occurs to a material as a load is applied and how to quantify its plastic deformation are the most important concepts to be learned form this experiment. Equipment A) Tensile test 1. Tensile test machine 2. Test specimens a. AISI 1020 plain carbon steel with 0.2 wt% carbon b. AISI 4340 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy steel with 0.4 wt% carbon c. 2024-T3 aluminum-copper alloy B) Fracture surface observation using the Scanning Electron Microscope Background The elastic and plastic deformation properties of a material are often determined by a “uniaxial tensile test.” A test specimen of initial length l o and initial cross sectional area A o is subjected to a monotonically increasing load. Both the applied load and the amount of elongation are simultaneously monitored by a computer. The data can then be displayed as a graph of "applied load" versus "elongation," or as a graph of "stress" versus "strain" as shown below.
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E 45 3 Fig. 2-1 Schematic stress-strain curve for a plain carbon steel. Note the serrated yielding behavior of this material, resulting in upper and lower yield points. Typically “engineering stress” and “engineering strain” are used. The
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2010 for the course ENGLISH 45 taught by Professor Morris during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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E45 - Lab 7 - Uniaxial Test - Engineering 45 Properties of...

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