Lecture 11 - Ge s arere ne sponsiblefor diffe nt traits. re...

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Genes are responsible for different traits. There may be multiple alleles for a gene, resulting in different phenotypes. What is the molecular basis for how the information in genes results in particular phenotypes?
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Fig. 7.20
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Fig. 7.20
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Based on their results, Beadle and Tatum proposed that one gene = one enzyme . This idea is key to the central dogma of genetics DNA --> RNA--> protein Proteins are linear polymers of amino acids. The primary sequence of a protein dictates how that protein will fold into secondary structures ( α -helices and β -sheets) which then fold to make the tertiary structure of the protein. The primary sequence of amino acids is determined by the linear sequence of nucleotides in the DNA.
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Fig. 7.23
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“One gene = one enzyme” has been modified to “one gene = one polypeptide” because not all proteins are enzymes and some enzymes require multiple subunits to function. Even this statement is not completely correct, as some genes encode RNA molecules only.
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in various processes provides a molecular explanation for why some alleles are recessive and for how incomplete and partial dominance occur. ARG3
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2010 for the course BIO 89329 taught by Professor Hollingsworth during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 11 - Ge s arere ne sponsiblefor diffe nt traits. re...

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