Lec4 - ECONOMICS 175 Professor Ronald D Lee Lecture 4 ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley Do not

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ECONOMICS 175 Professor Ronald D. Lee 1/29/09 Lecture 4 ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depends on your individual subscription for its continued existence. These notes are copyrighted by the University of California and are for your personal use only. D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. ANNOUNCEMENTS Readings for next Tuesday are Pindyck’s review of microeconomics (optional) and the Kristin Mammen article. There was a slip-up in the section 1-2 on Wednesday. Please see bSpace for the correction. When you make a population pyramid, the percentages should be calculated out of the total population. For example, males age 24 should be calculated out of the total population, not just male population. Sections for next week are posted on bSpace. There is a brand new reader for sale if you have not bought it yet. A student is selling it for $45. If you are interested, email [email protected] . ICLICKER QUESTIONS Question 1: In a stable population: A. the size of each age group is constant over time B. each age group is the same percent of the total population size C. the populations of Germany and Japan are declining, so they cannot be stable populations D. All of the above E. None of the above A would be true in a stationary population which I have not talked about. It is a special case of a stable population. A stable population can be growing. B is wrong as well. In a 3 rd world country with relatively high mortality and fertility there will be a higher proportion of children so no, B is not true. C is not true. A stable population can be a declining population. So E is the right answer. A stable population means the population at every age is growing at a constant rate over time. The percentage distribution of population by age is fixed. If 7% is age 0-4, there will be 7% in 100 years, 1000 years, etc. It can be declining or growing, the key thing is whatever it is doing, it continues to do this at the same rate. It is an important concept. For answer B, the wording is a bit ambiguous. If it were to say “each age group is the same percent of the total population size over time,” this would be right. I will start counting iClicker participation as of today. Make sure you get them. OUTLINE 1.) Evolution of the Family 2.) Models of labor supply LECTURE This is what I was showing at the end of the hour on Tuesday, a graph of “Sex Ratio in China in 2000 (Males/Females) by age.” It starts above 1.2 (reflects sex-selected abortion) and then was more normal between ages 20-60. It appears that this is a phase in economic development (Korea had high sex ratios at birth but it is now normal). At older ages, the sex ratio drops strongly, reflecting the fact that women live longer than men on average.
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ECONOMICS 175 ASUC Lecture Notes Online: Approved by the UC Board of Regents
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2010 for the course ECON 175 taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Lec4 - ECONOMICS 175 Professor Ronald D Lee Lecture 4 ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley Do not

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