Access_2003 - ACCESS 2003 Department of Client Services...

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A CCESS 2003 Department of Client Services Information Technology Systems Division What is a Database? 2 Where does Access 2003 fit in? 2 Steps in Designing and Building a Database 3 D a t a T y p e s 4 Creating a Database 5 Working with Tables 7 Sorting Data 8 Queries 10 Adding Criteria to a Query 11 Joining Tables in a Query 12 F o r m s 1 3 Modifying the Form Design 14 Create an Object on a Form 15 R e p o r t s 1 7 Creating a Report 17 Modifying a Report 19 TOPICS COVERED For assistance contact the Technology Assistance Center: 962-4357 E-mail: tac@uncw.edu Updated 11/05
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ACCESS 2003 Intermediate Access 2003 Department of Client Services Last Modified: 11/05 Information Technology Systems Division, UNCW 2 What is a Database? A database is a simply structured collection of data, with the emphasis very much on structured. Everyone encounters databases in their everyday lives, even if they are not in electronic form. Telephone books, diaries, and mailing order catalogues are all instances of databases. Computerized databases are created, stored, manipulated and maintained using Database Management Systems (DBMS); DBMS are the programs or groups of programs through which we gain access to databases. In the personal computer world, DBMSs are often referred to as database packages or database applications. Depending on the way data is modeled, we have Flat-File, Hierarchical, and Relational data models. The data model defines how real-world data is represented in the database. DBMSs are typically tied to one type of data model. Microsoft Access 2003 is based on the relational model, and is therefore a relational DBMS. Relational databases are built up of tables. The column headers in the table are called fields . The rows of data in the table are called records . Relational DBMSs are extremely fussy and insist that each record is uniquely identified by one of more fields . We will see when we design tables how a unique identifier or key is used. Where does Access 2003 fit in? You should consider building your database in Microsoft Access 2003 if your data structures can be represented by the relational model. This is true of most applications. If the data contained in your tables is mostly numeric data, then you are probably better off using a spreadsheet program such as Microsoft Excel 2003 . Spreadsheet programs are specifically designed to handle numeric data. Do you really need an Access 2003 database for your project?
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ACCESS 2003 Intermediate Access 2003 Department of Client Services Last Modified: 11/05 Information Technology Systems Division, UNCW 3 Steps in Designing and Building a Database Define the problem Decide what real world things (entities) you need to store information about. For example: Employees, Products, Customers, Orders, etc. Entities are represented by tables in the database. Decide what facts (attributes) you need to know about each
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Access_2003 - ACCESS 2003 Department of Client Services...

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