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Unformatted text preview: Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities Rhode Island College 600 Mt. Pleasant Avenue Providence, R.I. 02908 Spring 2007 no Vol. VI1, Editing: Sherlock Center Staff Design: GLADWORKS.COM Comments and suggestions to: Mark Gunning, Transition Coordinator E-mail: [email protected] 1 Attention Upcoming Seniors: Mark Gunning, the Sherlock Center’s Statewide Transition Coordinator, recently interviewed Holly Shadoian, PhD, Director of Admissions at Rhode Island College to zero in on the steps students can take the summer before their senior year in the college planning process. It is never too early to start the college planning process! Other ways to make use of the summer months in the College planning process “…starting a file or box of materials you collect from colleges is a great use of a student’s time in the summer. Students can easily become overwhelmed by the amount of materials generated from each and every college search: An organizational method like the file system can help students systematically compare offerings at all the different schools they are exploring. I’d also recommend that students take the time they have in the summer to register for the fall (October) SAT if they have only taken the test once as a junior or register for a SAT prep course if they are trying to improve their scores or are sitting for the exam for the first time and feel they are in need of preparation for this battery of tests.” Summer is a good time to do some advanced planning. continued from page 3... make an appointment anytime between the last two weeks of August and the first two weeks of classes in September. By that time, they should have their documentation ready to submit and will also have their class schedules, having already attended orientation. Certainly though, if there is a particular need such as accessibility or sign language interpreters, students should be in contact with the office much earlier. Q. Are their support groups on campus for students with disabilities where students can share experiences and offer each other advice and support for a successful experience at RIC? A. Support groups are offered based on student requests and/or interests. Disability Services in conjunction with the Counseling Center has offered these groups at various times throughout the year. Q. From your experience, what advice would you give to a student with a disability to better ensure academic and social success at RIC? A. I would strongly suggest that students become self-advocates, make use of the College’s many resources, and get involved in the campus community. And of course, register with Disability Services to request reasonable accommodations. Located in the Student life office, Craig-Lee, Room 127, Disability Services welcomes walk-ins but encourages appointments. Office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM during the academic year and 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM during the summer. Ms. Roccio can be reached at (401) 456-8061 or at [email protected] TTY (via RI Relay): 1-800-745-5555 © Rhode Island College This material is copyrighted by Rhode Island College; it may be copied or otherwise reproduced without permission. Alternate Format: College Link is available on the Internet at www.sherlockcenter.org.If you need information in an alternative format, please call the Sherlock Center office at 401-456-8072 V, 401-456-8773 TDD. Disclaimer: Articles in the College Link are designed to inform students pursuing higher education. Every effort is made to present current and accurate information, but all materials are provided “as is” with no warranties of any kind. Information available at the time of publication may be subject to change without notice. “Summers are interesting because families often have the time (vacation) to do campus visits. And while it is a great idea to make your initial visit to schools of potential interest during the summer break, it is so important to keep in mind that a summer visit will not be quite the same as a fall or spring follow-up visit when regular classes are in session.” Limitations of summer college tours “Well for one thing, the full student body isn’t there, and it’s hard to get the “feel” of the campus when it is in full swing. From an Admission’s Office perspective, I need to point out that the latest and newest version of the school’s admissions publications may not yet be available. Also, faculty may be less available if the student wants to get more specific about a major--although this can vary school to school. To be sure, students can contact departments at schools of interest to determine availability of faculty.” continued on page 2... Advantage of a summer visit to colleges of potential interest “Summer visitations are one good way to start sorting through which colleges / universities / professional schools will stay on the student’s list of possibilities. To help in this sorting process, a student should spend some time thinking about the academic, environmental, geographic, and social factors that are compatible with his or her comfort zone. Contacting the schools in question, in advance, to determine who will be available on campus to answer these questions during the summer visit will help the student in this process of elimination.” Summer Planning Calendar pg 2 College Spotlight on Rhode Island College pg 3 continued from front... .What about cost? “Oh, Yes!! Cost is a major factor for almost all students to consider when applying to colleges. It is just a fact of life. Given that, summer is a great time to investigate scholarships that are given locally, statewide and by private foundations / organizations. * It is also a great time to investigate financial aid deadlines of schools that students are interested in and add them to the file box they have developed for schools of interest. It is also a great time to familiarize themselves with the FAFSA process and deadlines. This is critical, but so many students fail to start this process early and often miss the deadline… and it is so easy to complete now with online support. Students and their families can go to and get step-by-step help and come to fully understand the process. Dr. Shadoian serves as the Director of Admissions at Rhode Island College. For further information about programs at RIC and the admissions process there, you may contact her office, located in the Foreman Center, at (401) 456-8234. Be sure to see our September College Link issue wherein Dr. Shadoian discusses how to utilize your senior year to its best advantage in the college planning process. *Begin to search for sources of financial aid from private organizations and foundations (these have to be searched for, independently, because unlike federal aid, they are usually merit-based awards). Good search engines, online, for finding private grants/scholarships are FASTWEB, and CollegeNet, Each private scholarship will likely have different deadlines and requirements, different from the FAFSA deadlines. College Sp otlight Rhode Island College Appropriate, current documentation still required to receive disability support services Ms. Ann Roccio, Director of Disability Services, sat down with the Sherlock Center’s Statewide Transition Coordinator, Mark Gunning, to provide an update regarding services for students with disabilities at Rhode Island College. The following is an excerpt from their conversation: documentation must include an ocular assessment describing visual acuity and field of vision, and hearing disability documentation must include an audiogram containing verification of hearing sensitivity to puretone frequency, and speech thresholds. The SSOP generally may not be sufficient documentation to meet all of the requirements previously mentioned. In that case, students would be responsible for providing current verification of their disability in order to receive reasonable accommodations. Here are some good web resources : • http://www.emich.edu/admissions/parents/choosejnr.html •..http://admissions.wustl.edu/admissions/ua.nsf/ Click on “Applications and Guides” and follow the links for The Road to College: A Guide to the College Admission Process. Check out the Junior Year Checklist on the site. Q. Are all disability types accommodated at Rhode Island College? A. Yes. Our office provides accommodations to students with all types of disabilities covered by the ADA, including mobility, hearing, vision, psychological, learning, attention, speech, and chronic health conditions. Q. Does your office provide the testing to meet the criteria of formal documentation to substantiate the presence of a disability? A. No. RIC doesn’t provide any type of testing for disability verification. However, we can provide a resource list of evaluators for learning disabilities as a convenience to students, but the list is not exhaustive or comprehensive. Also, we do not recommend or endorse any of the providers on the list. And I should mention that the student is responsible of all charges incurred in the evaluation process. • http://www.nacacnet.org/MemberPortal/ForStudents/CollegePrep/JrYrCal.htm • http://www.curriculumunits.com/Resume/resume/collegeadmission/collegecalendar.htm Q. To receive accommodations, do students have to provide you with formal documentation of the disability? Summer Planning Calendar at a glance... June • Set up appointments to visit colleges/determine faculty availability/visit colleges • Register for the fall (October) SAT • Sign up for a SAT prep course • Write to Colleges on your list, visit their Web sites, and request their applications • Check with your school guidance counselor for procedures to leave class to attend information sessions offered by college representatives next fall August • Continue to refine your college list • Work on drafts for college essays • Collect writing samples • Assemble portfolios • Research private sources of scholarships and other forms of financial aid including colleges, businesses, private foundations, labor unions, government agencies, ethnic, veteran, religious, fraternal, high school and civic organizations. Request scholarship applications from these organizations • Ask teachers for recommendations • Check with your guidance counselor to verify graduation requirements and credits • If you are an athlete and plan on playing in college, contact the coaches at the schools to which you are applying and ask about intercollegiate and intramural sports programs and athletic scholarships A. Yes they do. In order for students to receive accommodations, they must self identify by registering with this office and provide formal documentation of their disability. Q. Are there timelines necessary to meet in order to receive disability support services? A. Ideally, students seeking testing or other classroom accommodations should register with my office as soon as possible and at least within the first two weeks of the semester. Students who need physical accessibility accommodations and/or use of sign language interpreters should request accommodations as soon as possible but no less than two weeks before the beginning of the semester. All students receiving support services should meet with me at the beginning of any semester in which accommodations are requested. Technically though, a student can request accommodations at any time during their academic career; but they must remember that accommodations are not retroactive. Q. What constitutes “formal documentation”? Does the current Student Summary of Performance (SSOP) given to high school seniors with disabilities qualify as the formal documentation needed to receive support services from your office? A. Our policy requires that students provide disability verification documentation which is current and states the disability. It also needs to state the severity of the disability and how the conditions severely limits major life function, what reasonable accommodations would be recommended, and must give explanation of the need for those specific recommendations. Additionally, with certain disabilities, specific requirements for documentation are needed; for example: learning disability documentation must include the actual testing with scores and percentiles, visual disability July • • • • • Visit colleges Take tours Have interviews and ask questions Involve your parents in the steps of this process Investigate the FAFSA process online Q. Is it a good idea for students to meet with you and register the summer before initial enrollment? A. In general, I tell students that it is best if they can continued on back... continued from front... .What about cost? “Oh, Yes!! Cost is a major factor for almost all students to consider when applying to colleges. It is just a fact of life. Given that, summer is a great time to investigate scholarships that are given locally, statewide and by private foundations / organizations. * It is also a great time to investigate financial aid deadlines of schools that students are interested in and add them to the file box they have developed for schools of interest. It is also a great time to familiarize themselves with the FAFSA process and deadlines. This is critical, but so many students fail to start this process early and often miss the deadline… and it is so easy to complete now with online support. Students and their families can go to and get step-by-step help and come to fully understand the process. Dr. Shadoian serves as the Director of Admissions at Rhode Island College. For further information about programs at RIC and the admissions process there, you may contact her office, located in the Foreman Center, at (401) 456-8234. Be sure to see our September College Link issue wherein Dr. Shadoian discusses how to utilize your senior year to its best advantage in the college planning process. *Begin to search for sources of financial aid from private organizations and foundations (these have to be searched for, independently, because unlike federal aid, they are usually merit-based awards). Good search engines, online, for finding private grants/scholarships are FASTWEB, and CollegeNet, Each private scholarship will likely have different deadlines and requirements, different from the FAFSA deadlines. College Sp otlight Rhode Island College Appropriate, current documentation still required to receive disability support services Ms. Ann Roccio, Director of Disability Services, sat down with the Sherlock Center’s Statewide Transition Coordinator, Mark Gunning, to provide an update regarding services for students with disabilities at Rhode Island College. The following is an excerpt from their conversation: documentation must include an ocular assessment describing visual acuity and field of vision, and hearing disability documentation must include an audiogram containing verification of hearing sensitivity to puretone frequency, and speech thresholds. The SSOP generally may not be sufficient documentation to meet all of the requirements previously mentioned. In that case, students would be responsible for providing current verification of their disability in order to receive reasonable accommodations. Here are some good web resources : • http://www.emich.edu/admissions/parents/choosejnr.html •..http://admissions.wustl.edu/admissions/ua.nsf/ Click on “Applications and Guides” and follow the links for The Road to College: A Guide to the College Admission Process. Check out the Junior Year Checklist on the site. Q. Are all disability types accommodated at Rhode Island College? A. Yes. Our office provides accommodations to students with all types of disabilities covered by the ADA, including mobility, hearing, vision, psychological, learning, attention, speech, and chronic health conditions. Q. Does your office provide the testing to meet the criteria of formal documentation to substantiate the presence of a disability? A. No. RIC doesn’t provide any type of testing for disability verification. However, we can provide a resource list of evaluators for learning disabilities as a convenience to students, but the list is not exhaustive or comprehensive. Also, we do not recommend or endorse any of the providers on the list. And I should mention that the student is responsible of all charges incurred in the evaluation process. • http://www.nacacnet.org/MemberPortal/ForStudents/CollegePrep/JrYrCal.htm • http://www.curriculumunits.com/Resume/resume/collegeadmission/collegecalendar.htm Q. To receive accommodations, do students have to provide you with formal documentation of the disability? Summer Planning Calendar at a glance... June • Set up appointments to visit colleges/determine faculty availability/visit colleges • Register for the fall (October) SAT • Sign up for a SAT prep course • Write to Colleges on your list, visit their Web sites, and request their applications • Check with your school guidance counselor for procedures to leave class to attend information sessions offered by college representatives next fall August • Continue to refine your college list • Work on drafts for college essays • Collect writing samples • Assemble portfolios • Research private sources of scholarships and other forms of financial aid including colleges, businesses, private foundations, labor unions, government agencies, ethnic, veteran, religious, fraternal, high school and civic organizations. Request scholarship applications from these organizations • Ask teachers for recommendations • Check with your guidance counselor to verify graduation requirements and credits • If you are an athlete and plan on playing in college, contact the coaches at the schools to which you are applying and ask about intercollegiate and intramural sports programs and athletic scholarships A. Yes they do. In order for students to receive accommodations, they must self identify by registering with this office and provide formal documentation of their disability. Q. Are there timelines necessary to meet in order to receive disability support services? A. Ideally, students seeking testing or other classroom accommodations should register with my office as soon as possible and at least within the first two weeks of the semester. Students who need physical accessibility accommodations and/or use of sign language interpreters should request accommodations as soon as possible but no less than two weeks before the beginning of the semester. All students receiving support services should meet with me at the beginning of any semester in which accommodations are requested. Technically though, a student can request accommodations at any time during their academic career; but they must remember that accommodations are not retroactive. Q. What constitutes “formal documentation”? Does the current Student Summary of Performance (SSOP) given to high school seniors with disabilities qualify as the formal documentation needed to receive support services from your office? A. Our policy requires that students provide disability verification documentation which is current and states the disability. It also needs to state the severity of the disability and how the conditions severely limits major life function, what reasonable accommodations would be recommended, and must give explanation of the need for those specific recommendations. Additionally, with certain disabilities, specific requirements for documentation are needed; for example: learning disability documentation must include the actual testing with scores and percentiles, visual disability July • • • • • Visit colleges Take tours Have interviews and ask questions Involve your parents in the steps of this process Investigate the FAFSA process online Q. Is it a good idea for students to meet with you and register the summer before initial enrollment? A. In general, I tell students that it is best if they can continued on back... Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities Rhode Island College 600 Mt. Pleasant Avenue Providence, R.I. 02908 Spring 2007 no Vol. VI1, Editing: Sherlock Center Staff Design: GLADWORKS.COM Comments and suggestions to: Mark Gunning, Transition Coordinator E-mail: [email protected] 1 Attention Upcoming Seniors: Mark Gunning, the Sherlock Center’s Statewide Transition Coordinator, recently interviewed Holly Shadoian, PhD, Director of Admissions at Rhode Island College to zero in on the steps students can take the summer before their senior year in the college planning process. It is never too early to start the college planning process! Other ways to make use of the summer months in the College planning process “…starting a file or box of materials you collect from colleges is a great use of a student’s time in the summer. Students can easily become overwhelmed by the amount of materials generated from each and every college search: An organizational method like the file system can help students systematically compare offerings at all the different schools they are exploring. I’d also recommend that students take the time they have in the summer to register for the fall (October) SAT if they have only taken the test once as a junior or register for a SAT prep course if they are trying to improve their scores or are sitting for the exam for the first time and feel they are in need of preparation for this battery of tests.” Summer is a good time to do some advanced planning. continued from page 3... make an appointment anytime between the last two weeks of August and the first two weeks of classes in September. By that time, they should have their documentation ready to submit and will also have their class schedules, having already attended orientation. Certainly though, if there is a particular need such as accessibility or sign language interpreters, students should be in contact with the office much earlier. Q. Are their support groups on campus for students with disabilities where students can share experiences and offer each other advice and support for a successful experience at RIC? A. Support groups are offered based on student requests and/or interests. Disability Services in conjunction with the Counseling Center has offered these groups at various times throughout the year. Q. From your experience, what advice would you give to a student with a disability to better ensure academic and social success at RIC? A. I would strongly suggest that students become self-advocates, make use of the College’s many resources, and get involved in the campus community. And of course, register with Disability Services to request reasonable accommodations. Located in the Student life office, Craig-Lee, Room 127, Disability Services welcomes walk-ins but encourages appointments. Office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM during the academic year and 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM during the summer. Ms. Roccio can be reached at (401) 456-8061 or at [email protected] TTY (via RI Relay): 1-800-745-5555 © Rhode Island College This material is copyrighted by Rhode Island College; it may be copied or otherwise reproduced without permission. Alternate Format: College Link is available on the Internet at www.sherlockcenter.org.If you need information in an alternative format, please call the Sherlock Center office at 401-456-8072 V, 401-456-8773 TDD. Disclaimer: Articles in the College Link are designed to inform students pursuing higher education. Every effort is made to present current and accurate information, but all materials are provided “as is” with no warranties of any kind. Information available at the time of publication may be subject to change without notice. “Summers are interesting because families often have the time (vacation) to do campus visits. And while it is a great idea to make your initial visit to schools of potential interest during the summer break, it is so important to keep in mind that a summer visit will not be quite the same as a fall or spring follow-up visit when regular classes are in session.” Limitations of summer college tours “Well for one thing, the full student body isn’t there, and it’s hard to get the “feel” of the campus when it is in full swing. From an Admission’s Office perspective, I need to point out that the latest and newest version of the school’s admissions publications may not yet be available. Also, faculty may be less available if the student wants to get more specific about a major--although this can vary school to school. To be sure, students can contact departments at schools of interest to determine availability of faculty.” continued on page 2... Advantage of a summer visit to colleges of potential interest “Summer visitations are one good way to start sorting through which colleges / universities / professional schools will stay on the student’s list of possibilities. To help in this sorting process, a student should spend some time thinking about the academic, environmental, geographic, and social factors that are compatible with his or her comfort zone. Contacting the schools in question, in advance, to determine who will be available on campus to answer these questions during the summer visit will help the student in this process of elimination.” Summer Planning Calendar pg 2 College Spotlight on Rhode Island College pg 3 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/28/2010 for the course CMSY 103 taught by Professor N/a during the Fall '06 term at Howard County Community College.

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