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Unformatted text preview: MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Brian Schweitzer, Governor Montana Department of Labor and Industry Keith Kelly, Commissioner Created by the Montana Career Resource Network Research & Analysis Bureau P.O. Box 1728 Helena, MT 59624-1728 (406) 444-2430 www.ourfactsyourfuture.org Career Resource Network Director: Shaunda Hildebrand Editor: Robert C. Marvin Contributors: Annette Miller Shaunda Hildebrand Joe Ruby BUREAU MONTANA CAREER RESOURCE NET WORK www.ourfactsyourfuture.org WHAT’S INSIDE? Introduction: Why Use This Guide? .................................................................................................... 2 Interest Assessment ........................................................................................................................... 3 Investigating Careers: Gaining Experience ........................................................................................ 5 Reality Check: The High Cost of Lifestyle ........................................................................................... 7 Education Pays.....................................................................................................................................9 College Entrance Requirements ....................................................................................................... 10 Higher Education & Vocational Training ............................................................................................11 Montana Schools ................................................................................................................................12 Apprenticeship Programs .................................................................................................................. 13 Financial Aid ........................................................................................................................................14 In-Demand Job Skills ..........................................................................................................................16 The Job Search ....................................................................................................................................18 Job Service Workforce Center Locations ..........................................................................................19 Marketing Yourself ............................................................................................................................20 Cover Letters ...................................................................................................................................... 22 Resumes ............................................................................................................................................. 23 The Job Interview...............................................................................................................................24 Job Seeker Resources ....................................................................................................................... 25 Occupations Guide .............................................................................................................................26 Arts and Communications Cluster: Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications Occupations .......................................................... 27 Business, Management, and Information Systems Cluster: Business, Management, and Administration Occupations .....................................................30 Finance Occupations .................................................................................................................. 33 Hospitality & Tourism Occupations ...........................................................................................36 Information Technology Occupations ...................................................................................... 40 Marketing, Sales, & Service .......................................................................................................43 Environmental and Agricultural Systems Cluster: Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Occupations ............................................................. 47 Health Sciences Cluster: Health Sciences Occupations ......................................................................................................51 Human Services and Resources Cluster: Education & Training Occupations ............................................................................................ 55 Government & Public Administration Occupations .................................................................58 Human Services Occupations ................................................................................................... 60 Law, Public Safety, & Security Occupations ..............................................................................63 Industrial, Manufacturing, and Engineering Systems Cluster: Architecture & Construction Occupations ................................................................................65 Manufacturing Occupations ..................................................................................................... 69 Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics Occupations............................................. 71 Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics Occupations ........................................................... 73 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 1 the single most annoying question, and the one we seemed to get asked on a weekly basis, was “What do you want to do for a living?” The standard reply was, “How am I supposed to know? I’m only a sophomore!” To this, the usual response was, “That’s the time to start planning.” We didn’t know it then, but all those annoying teachers and relatives were right. Consider this, if you wait until your senior year to decide on a career path, you may find that the type of college you want to attend requires four years of math in high school. Suppose you didn’t sign up for a math class this semester? By not planning ahead, you’ve severely limited your options. But don’t panic (there you go, take nice deep breaths). Now remember, you are not “deciding what you want to do for the rest of your life.” Chances are, you’re going to change your mind several times along the way, and that’s okay. Only through experience do we learn what kind of work we are best suited for. That’s why it is so important to begin exploring careers early--so we have time to find out what we like and dislike about a number of jobs before committing to a certain path. And it is a commitment, of both time and money. Most jobs that pay a decent wage require a good deal of training and education. Before you shell out the bucks to attend a university, it’s a good idea to have set some clear goals for yourself. The purpose of this guide is to help you take the first step in setting career goals. Whether you’ve known what job you want since the second grade, or have no idea what kind of jobs are out there, this guide can help. Inside you’ll find an interest assessment that will help you match up your interests with specific jobs. You’ll find an occupations guide that describes over two hundred of the top occupations in Montana, tells you how fast each is growing and what level of education is required, and lists low, median, and highend wages. There are also sections that will help you choose a training program, gain necessary work experience, market your skills in a resume, and interview for a job. Whether you are a high school sophomore considering careers for the first time, a stay-at-home-parent reentering the workforce after several years, or someone just looking for a new line of work, this guide has valuable information for you. Good luck and happy hunting! In high school, MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 2 WHAT’S YOUR CALLING? Some people report having had a “calling” to their chosen profession, meaning that they instinctively knew which job they were best suited to do. For the rest of us, it’s not so easy. Even if you have no idea what career you’d like to pursue, you know that you’ll want a job that matches your personality and interests. Discovering who you are and what you want out of life is probably the most important step in the career decision-making process. Unfortunately, it’s also a step many people neglect when making major life decisions. Experts agree that work satisfaction depends on matching your personality with your work environment. Working full-time can add up to 80,000 hours of work during your lifetime. Considering the number of hours of your life at stake, the amount of time it takes to do a self-assessment is negligible. Your likes and dislikes are extremely important in your career planning. They will supply you with ideas of what types of work will suit you best. The following interest assessment is based on Holland’s g Interest Inventory. Mark the circle following each When you ished, statement you agree with. When you are finished, n each column. The three add the number of marks in each column. The three scores your letters with the highest scores are your “interest profile.” t pro You can use your interest profile to peci match your interests with specific the occupations. Just flip to the ) occupations guide (page 26) and look in the second MCIS Assessment Resources The The Montana Career Information System (MCIS) is is available through most Montana high schools, all Montana Job Service Workforce Centers, and at home for free at www.smartaboutcollege.org. www.smartaboutcollege.org (This (This assessment not available through www.smartaboutcollege.org) www.smartaboutcollege.org Learn which occupations match your interests IDEAS IDEAS Assessment Allows you to match your skills with specific occupations Identify your strongest work-related interests Find out which work values are most important to you, then explore occupations that match your values. Micro SKILLS Assessment O*Net Interest Profiler Work Importance Locator column. You’ll find interest profiles marked for each occupation. And remember, you don’t have to limit yourself only to occupations that match your profile exactly. This excercise will just give you an idea of g where to start looking. MONTA MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 ONT ONT ONT NT NT NT NT NT T EER GUIDE 2009 EER GUIDE 2009 EER GUIDE 2009 EER GUIDE 2009 EER GUIDE 2009 EER GUIDE 2009 EER GUIDE 2009 ER GU E ER GU DE ER GU DE ER GU DE ER GU DE 2 0 ER GUIDE 2 0 R GUIDE R GU 3 I LIKE TO... ...do puzzles ...work on cars ...work independently ...work in teams ...organize things like files, offices, or activities ...set goals for myself ...build things ...read about art or music ...have clear instructions to follow ...influence or persuade people ...do experiments ...teach or train people ...help people solve their problems ...take care of animals ...have my day structured ...sell things ...do creative writing ...work on science projects ...take on new responsibilities ...heal people ...figure out how things work ...put things together or assemble models ...be creative ...pay attention to details ...do filing or typing ...learn about other cultures ...analyze problems, situations, or trends ...play instruments or sing ...dream about starting my own business ...cook ...act in plays ...think things through before making decisions ...work with numbers or charts ...discuss current events or politics ...keep records of my work ...be a leader ...work outdoors ...work in an office ...work on math problems ...help people ...draw ...give speeches WHAT THE LETTERS MEAN: REALISTIC Realistic people are often good at mechanical or athletic jobs. They like to work with things, like machines, tools, or plants, and they like to work with their hands. They are often practical and good at solving problems. INVESTIGATIVE Investigative people like to watch, learn, analyze and solve problems. They often like to work independently, tend to be good at math and science, and enjoy analyzing data. ARTISTIC Artistic people like to work in unstructured situations where they can use their creativity and come up with new ideas. They enjoy performing (theater or music) and visual arts. SOCIAL Social people like to work directly with people rather than things. They enjoy training, instructing, counseling, or curing others. They are often good public speakers with helpful, empathetic personalities. ENTERPRISING Enterprising people like to work with other people. They particularly enjoy influencing, persuading, and performing. They like to lead and tend to be assertive and enthusiastic. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 CONVENTIONAL YOUR INTEREST PROFILE: Add Each Column RIASEC Write your top three totals here Assessment exercise adapted from Mncareers 2005 (www.mncareers.org) Conventional people are very detail oriented and like to work with data. They have good organizational and numerical abilities and are good at following instructions. Conventional people also like working in structured situations. 4 Sometimes our ideas about a career have little to do with its reality. This is why it is so important to investigate a possible career before you decide to pursue it. Unfortunately, this step in career planning is the one most often skipped, since it does take some effort. However, considering the effort (not to mention money) it will take to earn a degree or license toward your chosen profession, it is well worth your time. Just imagine spending four years and thousands of dollars earning a degree, only to discover that the job you thought you wanted is nothing like you thought it would be. It happens. Even if you’re certain you know what a career entails, and that you want to pursue it, investigating that career is still worth your time. It will give you the chance to learn what employers in your field are looking for in an applicant. You’ll also make important contacts in the industry. Never underestimate the importance of letting employers in your field know who you are and that you are interested in what they do. By reading career descriptions in this guide, you’ve already taken the first step toward investigating careers, but now it is time to take the next step. You’ll find there are a number of great ways to begin exploring careers. They include: • • • • • Informational Interviews Job Shadowing Internships Volunteer Work Part-Time or Temporary Work to share their experience with an enthusiastic newcomer. Such interviews may even be helpful to employers, giving them the chance to communicate exactly the types of skills and training they need in new employees. Questions to ask: You probably won’t have a lot of time, so choose only a few important questions. Here are some ideas: • How did you get into this type of work? This job? • What type of preparation/education/training did you have? What is required? • What do you enjoy the most about your job? The least? • What three skills do you use most often on the job? • Describe a typical day or week at your job. • What motivates you? • Describe difficulties you regularly face on the job. • What are the advancement opportunities and limits? • What must a person know to stay competitive? MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Informational Interviews Informational interviews are the most direct way to find out about an occupation and to establish contacts. They also take less commitment than internships or part-time employment. All you need to do is find someone who has the kind of job you want and is willing to talk to you about it. Don’t be afraid that you are wasting their time; you’d be surprised how many professionals are willing 5 • How does this job affect your home life? • What are typical entry-level job titles and duties? • Here are my strengths. How do they fit in this field? When your time is almost up, end the interview. Thank the interviewee verbally and shake hands. Remember to ask for a business card, and to be referred to others who might be willing to grant you an interview. When you eventually do get a job, make sure to tell your interviewees about it—they’ll want to know how your search ended. Internships Internships are basically short-term jobs that may last for a few weeks or a few months. They may be paid or unpaid positions, but for your time and labor, you’ll gain on-the-job experience under the guidance of a supervisor, enhance your qualifications, and make valuable professional contacts. Volunteer Work Volunteer work may not earn you a paycheck, but it pays off in other ways. It looks great on a college application or resume, particularly if your work experience is limited. Like an internship, volunteer work gives you actual work experience and helps you make valuable professional contacts. Hospitals, schools, religious and political groups, child care and senior centers often need and welcome enthusiastic volunteers willing to give their time in exchange for practical experience. Tips: • Interview several people in each occupation – often people with the same job title perform very different tasks • When you call, say how you got that person’s name. • Explain that you’re seeking advice and experience • Set a time limit for the interview (generally 15 to 20 minutes) and stick to it • Take notes • Do your research – you won’t have a lot of time, so eliminate certain basic questions by researching about what the company does. • Dress and act professionally • Don’t ask the person for a job in any way Part-Time or Temporary Jobs To many students, part-time and summer jobs are merely a way to earn some pocket money, but they don’t have to be. Looking for part-time work related to your long-term career goals is a great way to gain experience, make contacts, and to help you decide if a certain career is right for you. If you haven’t yet decided on long-term career goals, part-time jobs provide you with the opportunity to try out several types of work. Your part-time job may mean you have to deal with customers all day long, it may involve sitting in an office for long periods of time, or it may mean performing physically demanding tasks. Is this something you would enjoy doing on a permanent basis? Finding out you don’t like something is as important as discovering the things you do enjoy. Remember, even if the part-time job doesn’t turn out to be all that you’d hoped for, your good performance can provide you with great references for future positions. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 6 • Follow up with a thank you note. Job Shadowing Job shadowing gives you a chance to directly observe someone on the job. You may spend anywhere from a few hours to a few days watching, listening, and asking questions as the employee performs their job. It’s a great way to see firsthand the skills needed for a career you may be considering. Check out www.jobshadow.org for a complete job shadowing “How-To” guide. “Money doesn’t matter. I just want a job that I enjoy doing.” It’s a phrase one hears all the time when the subject of career planning comes up. But have you ever considered the type of lifestyle your dream job will buy you? Check out the four lifestyles described below, then flip the page you see what you’d need to earn to afford to live that way. LIFESTYLE A: Residence: Small Apartment/Trailer Rent: Utilities/Phone/Etc.: Monthly Cost: $500 $100 LIFESTYLE B: Residence: Starter Home Payment/Rent: Utilities/Phone/Etc.: MONTHLY COST: $650 $195 Transportation: Used Car Payment: Vehicle Maintenance, Insurance, & Fuel: Other Costs: Groceries: Clothing: Leisure Activities: Misc. Household Items, Haircuts, etc.: Savings: $100 $100 $250 $40 $100 $50 $50 Transportation: Compact Car/Van Payment: Vehicle Maintenance, Insurance, & Fuel: Other Costs: Groceries: Clothing: Leisure Activities: Misc. Household Items, Haircuts, etc.: Savings: $250 $150 $300 $75 $100 $75 $150 Total Monthly Cost of Lifestyle A: $1,290 Total Monthly Cost of Lifestyle A: $2,000 LIFESTYLE C: Residence: Moderately-Priced House Payment: Utilities/Phone/Etc.: Monthly Cost: $900 $270 LIFESTYLE D: Residence: High-End Luxury Home Payment: Utilities/Phone/Etc.: Monthly Cost: $2,500 $750 Transportation: 4WD Car/Sedan Payment: Vehicle Maintenance, Insurance, & Fuel: Other Costs: Groceries: Clothing: Leisure Activities: Misc. Household Items, Haircuts, etc.: Savings: $350 $150 $325 $100 $175 $100 $200 Transportation: Luxury Automobile Payment: Vehicle Maintenance, Insurance, & Fuel: Other Costs: Groceries: Clothing: Leisure Activities: Misc. Household Items, Haircuts, etc.: Savings: MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 $700 $400 $800 $300 $500 $300 $625 Total Monthly Cost of Lifestyle A: $2,545 Total Monthly Cost of Lifestyle A: $6,875 7 GED/High School Diploma Your job will generally require little or no experience, have few opportunities for advancement, and rarely include retirement or health benefits. High School + 2 Year College or Specialty Training Your job will require experience and prior training (apprenticeship, long term on-the-job training, Associate degree). Health insurance may be provided for employee and retirement plan may be an option. Monthly: Wages @ $6.25/hour: $1,083 Taxes, Social Security, Medicare: -$165 Retirement Plan: (Generally not available) $0 Total Available Income: $918 Wages @ $16/hour: Taxes, Social Security, Medicare: Retirement Plan: Total Available Income: Monthly: $2,773 -$623 -$156 $1,994 A You’re gonna need a second job to afford your own place. That or move back in with your folks. B You’re doing OK for one person, but it will be hard to support a family on your income. Specialty Training/Bachelor’s Degree Your job will require work related experience and the equivalent of a Bachelor’s degree or beyond. Health Insurance and retirement benefits will generally be available. Advanced Education/Entrepreneur Your job will require advanced education and/or extensive skill, high-level decision-making abilities, and responsibility. Or you could become a rock star. Wages @ $21/hour: Taxes, Social Security, Medicare: Retirement Plan: Monthly: $3,640 -$910 -$218 $2,512 Wages @ $70/hour: Taxes, Social Security, Medicare: Retirement Plan: Total Available Income: Monthly: $12,133 -$3,640 -$728 $7,765 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Total Available Income: C You make a decent living. You don’t live in the lap of luxury, but you’re comfortable. You may need to advance in your career to put your kids through college or buy a boat. D You’ve made it! You’re one of the lucky few. But don’t blow your whole fortune on Bentleys and Cristal. You still need to save and invest wisely to maintain this lifestyle into retirement. 8 THE THE ROAD TO RICHES IS PAVED PAVED BY EDUCATION... MONTANA JOBS BY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS ...or so the numbers suggest. The chart below shows that your level of education makes a substantial difference in the amount you earn. For example, the average wage for someone with a Bachelor’s (four-year) degree is almost twice that of someone working a job requiring only short to moderate-term onBachelor’s Degree the-job training; while people with doctoral Doctorate or with Work Experience Professional or Master’s Degree or professional degrees (physicians, lawyers, Degree etc.) earned nearly three times as much. But 5.4% Bachelor’s 2.0% Degree workers do not need that much education to 10.9% earn a bigger paycheck; simply completing Associate’s Degree high school (or earning a GED) increases or Post-secondary Montanan’s median earnings by $5,724 (34%) Vocational Training Short- to annually, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Moderate-Term 9.6% On-the-Job 2005-2007 American Community Survey. The Training numbers don’t lie; education pays. The pie chart 56.7% to the right shows a breakdown of Montana jobs based on education and training levels. As you can Long-Term On-the-Job Training see, well over half of the state’s jobs require no education or Work Experience in a Related Occuption beyond high school. Keep in mind that these jobs 15.3% generally pay less, and many Montanans work more than one job to make ends meet. The more education you have, the greater advantage you’ll have in a competitive job market. MONTANA AVERAGE WAGES BY TRAINING REQUIREMENT Doctoral or Professional Degree Bachelor’s Degree with Experience or Master’s Degree Bachelor’s Degree Associate’s Degree or Vocational Training Long-Term On-the-Job Training or Work Experience in a Related Occupation Short to Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training $85,130 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 $63,016 $46,236 $38,309 $39,189 $25,314 9 Even if you’re not sure you want to continue your education after high school, it is a good idea to choose your classes as if you were. That way, you’ll have completed the required coursework should you change your mind later. But what classes should you take? The following lists detail course requirements for entrance into the Montana university system, as well as recommended courses for other training paths. Every college has its own admissions standards, so if you have a specific school in mind, be sure to find out about those standards well in advance, and use them to plan your high school coursework. However, chances are that you don’t yet know which school you want to attend. In that case, the best way to prepare is to take the most challenging schedule you can handle. Take advanced placement or honors classes whenever possible. Remember, a B in an honors course can look better to an admissions officer than an A in a regular course, because it shows you are willing to take on a challenge. Most admissions offices look for a solid background in English, math, lab sciences, social studies, and foreign languages. If you plan to pursue a specific subject area, such as business or music, take these courses as well. If you have talent in arts or athletics, don’t neglect them. A well-balanced application shows involvement in extra-curricular activities as well as strong academic work. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR MONTANA’S UNIVERSITY SYSTEM: English: 4 years - emphasis on written and oral communication skills and literature Social Studies: 3 years – includes global studies, American history, government, economics, Indian history or other third year courses Mathematics: 3 years – includes Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II Laboratory Science: 2 years - includes earth science, biology, chemistry, physics Additional 2 years chosen from the following: Foreign Language: (preferably two years) Computer Science Visual and performing arts Vocational education units Math Standards: ACT – 18 minimum on math portion, SAT – 440 minimum on math portion, or Advanced Placement Calculus Exam – 3 minimum Note: minimum standards will increase in 2010. They will become 22 for the ACT, and 520 for the SAT Detailed info available at: http://mus.edu/asa/hscp/ RECOMMENDED HIGH SCHOOL COURSES FOR: On-the-job training: Business math English (writing and reading) Computer science Technical and two-year schools: Math – algebra, geometry, business math English – writing, speech, literature Social Studies – government, history Science – biology, chemistry, physics Computer science 4-year difficult admissions (Rigorous Core): English – 4 years Math – 4 years (including calculus) Foreign Language – 2 years min. (same language) Science – 3 years laboratory science Social Studies - 3 years History – 2 years MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 10 You might be tempted to take on a less challenging schedule your senior year. Don’t. Not only does this look bad to an admissions officer, it will leave you illprepared for the rigorous work you’ll face in college. WHAT TYPE OF TRAINING PROGRAM IS RIGHT FOR YOU? Too often, high school graduates enroll in a four-year college simply because they don’t know what else to do. They end up switching majors, dropping out, or transferring to a different school, all of which means wasted time and money. It is important to have clear career goals so you can choose the right training program the first time around. Many high-paying occupations in Montana require only a two-year degree, which gets students into the workforce in half the time, and often with half the debt. So which type of program is right for you? This guide will give you a basic idea of the types of education and training programs available to you. Colleges of Technology Technical colleges tend to be career-oriented, offering mainly two-year programs that qualify students for employment in various technical fields. They offer associate’s degrees, certifications, and specialized endorsements. Montana’s colleges of technology are affiliated with the university system, and credits are transferrable should a student decide to transfer to a four-year school. Montana has four colleges of technology. Those affiliated with Montana State University are located in Billings and Great Falls, and those affiliated with the University of Montana are located in Butte and Helena. Each offers a variety of programs and degrees. These include: g • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Accounting Associate of Arts Automobile Collision Repair & Refinishing Aviation Science and Technology Business Management Computer Technology - Application Development Computer Technology - Networking Construction Technology Diesel Technology Drafting & Design Technology Electronics Fire Science Health Sciences - Medical Assistant Health Sciences - Paramedics Health Sciences - Practical Nursing Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Interior Design Radiologic Technology Surgical Technology Welding & Metal Fabrication ...and more Community Colleges Much like technical colleges, community colleges offer two-year degree programs, along with specialized certification programs and endorsements. Community colleges tend to focus on the training needs of a specific community. In Montana, many community colleges are affiliated with Native American tribes, and serve not only to educate and train the local workforce, but to preserve the traditions and culture of Montana’s native peoples. Specialized Trade Schools Trade schools provide short-term programs (less than two years) that prepare students for specific careers, such as law enforcement, cosmetology, taxidermy, and radiology (see list p. 12). Liberal Arts Colleges Liberal Arts schools tend to emphasize broad knowledge in arts, sciences, and humanities rather than focussing on specialized career training. Programs and degrees offered vary widely by institution. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Public Universities Universities offer Bachelor’s (four-year) degrees in both the arts and sciences. Many also offer Master’s, Doctoral, and Professional degrees. Majors and degrees vary widely by institution, so make sure to research a school thoroughly before applying. 11 MONTANA COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES Blackfeet Community College Carroll College Chief Dull Knife College Dawson Community College FVCC Libby Campus Fort Belknap College Fort Peck Community College Little Big Horn College Miles Community College Montana Bible College Montana State University - Billings MSU - Billings College of Technology Montana State University - Bozeman MSU - Great Falls College of Technology Montana State University Northern Mountain States Baptist College Montana Tech (U of M) Rocky Mountain College Salish-Kootenai College Stone Child College University of Great Falls U of M - Butte College of Technology U of M - Helena College of Technology University of Montana - Missoula U of M - Missoula College of Technology University of Montana - Western Yellowstone Baptist College P.O. Box 819 1601 N. Benton Ave. P.O. Box 98 P.O. Box 421 225 Commerce Way P.O. Box 159 P.O. Box 398 1 Forst Lane 2715 Dickinson 3625 S. 19th 1500 University Dr. 3803 Central Ave. P.O. Box 172190 2100 16th Ave. S. P.O. Box 7751 216 9th St. N. 1300 W. Park St. 1511 Poly Dr. P.O. Box 70 RR1 Box 1082 1301 20th St. S. 25 Basin Creek Rd. 1115 Roberts St. 32 Campus Dr. 909 S. Ave. W. 710 S. Atlantic 1515 S. Shiloh Rd. Browning, MT 59417-0819 Helena, MT 59625-0002 Lame Deer, MT 59043-0098 Glendive, MT 59330-0421 Kalispell, MT 59901-2622 Libby, MT 59923 Harlem, MT 59526-0159 Poplar, MT 59255-0398 Crow Agency, MT 59022-0370 Miles City, MT 59301-4774 Bozeman, MT 59718 Billings, MT 59101-0298 Billings, MT 59102 Bozeman, MT 59717-2190 Great Falls, MT 59405 Havre, MT 59501-7751 Great Falls, MT 59401 Butte, MT 59701 Billings, MT 59102-1796 Pablo, MT 59855-0117 Box Elder, MT 59521 Great Falls, MT 59405 Butte, MT 59701 Helena, MT 59601 Missoula, MT 59812-0002 Missoula, MT 59801 Dillon, MT 59725-3598 Billings, MT 59106 406-338-5441 800-992-3648 406-477-6215 800-821-8320 406-756-3822 406-293-2721 406-353-2607 406-768-6300 406-638-3104 800-541-9281 888-462-2463 800-565-6782 406-247-3000 800-MSU-CATS 800-446-2698 800-662-6132 406-761-0308 800-445-TECH 800-877-6259 406-275-4800 406-395-4313 800-856-9544 406-496-3707 800-241-4882 800-462-8636 800-542-6882 800-UMW-MONT 800-487-9950 Flathead Valley Community College (FVCC) 777 Grandview Dr. SPECIALIZED TRADE SCHOOLS Academy of Cosmetology Academy of Nail & Skin, LLP Anaconda Job Corps Center Blanco Blanco Cosmetology School Butte Academy of Beauty Culture, Inc. Connole Morton Real Estate School Crevier’s School of Cosmetology Dahl’s College of Beauty DAVRON Telco Training, LLC H&R Block Income Tax Schools Kickinghorse Job Corps Missoula Valley School of Taxidermy Modern Beauty School Inc. Montana Guide Training Center Montana Law Enforcement Academy Montana School of Taxidermy & Tanning Sage Technical Services Trapper Creek Job Corps Center 133 W. Mendenhall 928 Broadwater Ave. Ste. C 1407 Foster Creek Rd. 901 24th St. W. 303 West Park 415 N. Higgins 134 First St. W. 716 Central Ave. 6635 Sleeping Giant View Dr. 2000 Mollman Pass Trail P.O. Box 1169 2700 Paxson, Suite G P.O. Box 150 2260 Sierra Road E. 3280 Green Meadow Dr. 3044 Hesper Rd. 5139 West Fork Rd. Bozeman, MT 59715 Billings, MT 59101 Anaconda, MT 59711 Billings, MT 59102 Butte, MT 59701 Missoula, MT 59802 Kalispell, MT 59901 Great Falls, MT 59401 Helena, MT 59602 Ronan, MT 59864 Thompson Falls, MT 59873 Missoula, MT 59801 Noxon, MT 59853 Helena, MT 59602 Helena, MT 59602 Billings, MT 59102 Darby, MT 59829 406-586-2520 406-252-3232 406-563-8700 406-652-2700 406-723-8565 406-543-3269 406-257-2525 406-454-3453 406-227-1194 406-644-2217 406-827-3170 406-721-1800 406-847-5582 or 406-847-0154 406-444-9950 406-443-0022 406-652-3030 406-821-3286 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 (7 locations in Montana - visit www.hrblock.com to find a school near you) 12 Union Apprenticeship Programs Billings Area Roofing #229 JATC Billings Painting Trades JATC #167 Billings Piping Industry JATC #30 Blackfeet Indian Contractors Assoc. Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen Local #3 Butte Automotive Trades Eagle Electric/Jeff Hoff er Great Falls Auto & Machinists JAT Helena Automotive Trades JATC International Union of Elevator Constructors Laborers AGC (heavy, highway construction) Missoula Electric Co-op JATC Missoula Plumbing Trades JATC Montana Carpenters JATC Montana-Dakota Utilities JATC Montana Dept. of Labor & Industry Montana Electrical JATC Montana Ironworkers JATC Montana State Sheet Metal Workers JATC Mountain States Line Constructors JATC Northwestern Energy Operating Engineers JATC Pacific Northwest Ironworkers JATC Plumbers and Pipefitters #41 JATC PPL Montana LLC - Colstrip JATC PPL Montana LLC - Corette PPL Montana LLC - Hydro Division Qwest JATC Smurfit Stone Container JATC West Central Montana Painters Industry JATC Western States Boilermakers #11 JATC Address P.O. Box 31866 530 S. 27th St. P.O. Box 30616 P.O. Box 2565 P.O.Box 63 156 W. Granite St. P.O. Box 5324 4 Eaton Ave. P.O. Box 6549 2112 Thorndyke Ave. W. 3100 Horseshoe Bend 1700 W. Broadway 1026 S. 5th St. W. 780 Carter Dr. 2603 2nd Ave. N. P.O. Box 1728 P.O. Box 4177 456 Arthur Ave. P.O. Box 4048 7001 S. 900 E. Ste. 240 40 E. Broadway 3110 Canyon Ferry Rd. 16610 E. Euclid P.O. Box 3172 P.O. Box 38 P.O. Box 30495 45 Basin Creek Rd. P.O. Box 407 P.O. Box 4707 P.O. Box 666 P.O. Box 1612 Billings, MT 59107 Billings, MT 59101 Billings, MT 59107-0616 Browning, MT 59417 Ramsey, MT 59748 Butte, MT 59701 Helena, MT 59604 Great Falls, Mt 59403 Helena, MT 59604 Seattle, WA 98199 Helena, MT 59601 Missoula, MT 59802 Missoula, MT 59801 Helena, MT 59601 Billings, MT 59101 Helena, MT 59624 Helena, MT 59604 Pocatello, ID 83201 Butte, MT 59702 Midvale, UT 84047 Butte, MT 59701 East Helena, MT 59604 Spokane, WA 99216 Butte, MT 59702 Colstrip, MT 59232 Billings, MT 59107-0495 Butte, MT 59701 West Yellowstone, MT 59758 Missoula, MT 59806-4707 Great Falls, MT 59403 Page, AZ 59635 Phone # 406-668-7532 406-259-6911 406-252-9371 406-338-5134 406-544-3027 406-442-8685 406-453-7555 406-442-5810 402-734-0209 406-442-9964 406-541-4433 406-549-3479 406-453-1301 701-222-7671 406-444-4100 406-449-7173 208-705-1703 406-533-0112 801-942-7472 406-497-2587 406-227-5600 509-922-3577 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 13 406-494-3051 406-748-5055 406-869-5100 406-533-3415 406-646-7554 406-626-4451 406-452-0889 406-494-3051 Higher Education is expensive. While it may pay off in the long run, you’ll have to pay up front. Some people have college funds set aside by their parents, but most of us will need some help paying for school. Luckily for the rest of us, there are many types of financial aid available. WHAT IS FINANCIAL AID? Simply stated, financial aid is money to help you pay for college. It comes from federal and state governments, banks, the schools themselves, and private donors. Some types of financial aid must be paid back, others do not. Like applying for admission to a school, there are strict deadlines in applying for financial aid, so make sure to find out about these deadlines well in advance. The amount and kind of financial aid you get is based on your financial need, your academic record, and on the kinds of aid available at the school you attend. Each source of financial aid has its unique requirements, so you’ll have to do some research to find out what types you are eligible for. Don’t assume you won’t be eligible. Not all financial aid sources are based on financial need, and most consider a combination of factors. WHO CAN GET FINANCIAL AID? WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT KINDS OF FINANCIAL AID? Grants Grants are money given to you, based on financial need, that you do not repay. The Pell Grant is a federal award to help undergraduate students pay for education beyond high school. The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) is for undergraduate students with exceptional financial need. Montana Higher Education Grant (MHEG) awards are based on financial need. MTAP-Baker Grants are based on financial need and student earnings. Students must have $2,600 in earnings to be eligible. Other loans available Institutional loans, deferred fee installment programs and short-term loan programs, Bureau of Indian Affairs and tribal loans, health profession loans, The Health Education Assistance Loan, The Health Professions Student Loan, and the Nursing Student Loan Program. Scholarships Scholarships are awarded by a variety of organizations and individuals, and do not need to be repaid. Scholarships may be awarded based on a number of different criteria, including academic performance, financial need, athletic or artistic ability, ethnicity, and field of study. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Student Loans Loans are money that you borrow and repay when you complete or leave school. The Perkins Loan is a low-interest loan for undergraduate and graduate students with exceptional financial need. The Stafford Loan is a low-interest loan for undergraduate and graduate students attending school at least half-time. Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) loans are made to parents of dependent undergraduate students enrolled at least halftime in an eligible school. Work -Study Programs Most colleges offer work-study programs, which provide part-time (20 hours or less per week) jobs for students with exceptional financial need. Jobs are usually on campus and are sometimes related to career goals or fields of study. Military and Veterans Financial Aid The U.S. Military offers four main Tuition Support Programs: Tuition Assistance, the Montgomery G.I. Bill, College Fund Programs, and Loan Repayment Programs. R.O.T.C. scholarships are also available. Find out more at www.todaysmilitary.com and www.gibill.va.gov. 14 Soon after January 1st (if you’re entering school in the fall) submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by mail or on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Each January, if you are planning to be in school next year, apply for financial aid again. Remember, you must reapply each year. Register with the Selective Service. It is required by law, and failure to register may prevent you from receiving federal financial aid. Drug charges may make you ineligible for federal financial aid. Find out about financial aid deadlines well in advance. Failure to meet a deadline may prevent you from entering school on time. If you are under 23, you will need to provide information about your parents’ finances on most financial aid applications. Sit down with your parents and compile this information so you can use it on applications. Keep copies of all your admissions and financial aid documents Contact the financial aid offices of prospective schools and request information on grants and scholarships available through the school. If you take out multiple student loans, you may find it easier to pay them off if you consolidate them into one monthly payment. For more information, visit www.loanconsolidation.ed.gov, or the Student Assistance Foundation’s website at www.safmt.org. TAX CREDITS Tax benefits can also help to lower the cost of your continuing education. Income restrictions may apply. American Opportunity Tax Credit Provides a maximum tax credit of $2,500 per eligible student per year to help cover the first two years of qualified expenses. Lifetime Learning Tax Credit Provides a maximum benefit of $2,000 per family for all undergraduates and graduate study for qualified expenses. Student Loan Interest Deduction Allows you to deduct up to $2,500 in student loan interest on your taxes. Includes loans used for higher education expenses at eligible institutions, including graduate schools. STUDENT ASSISTANCE FOUNDATION (SAF) MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 The Student Assistance Foundation (SAF) provides students and their families with information and resources to help them finance their college (and other post-secondary) education. The SAF website, located at www.smartaboutcollege.org, is quite possibly the most comprehensive source of financial aid information for Montana. Highlights of the site include: • • • • Student Loan Consolidation Free E-Book: “The Basics of Funding Your Education” Step-by step instructions on completing financial aid applications Links to Montana Schools’ financial aid resource pages • • • Grant Information Links to scholarship searches Financial Aid Calendar to help you meet deadlines 15 IN-DEMAND JOB SKILLS The days when a career was a lifetime commitment are long over. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that Americans will have an average of 3.5 different careers in their lives, and work for ten employers, keeping each job for 3.5 years. This refers not to specific jobs, but entire career paths. When entering an entirely new field, in which one has little to no experience, the skills acquired through unrelated jobs and life experiences can be a major selling point on a resume. But which skills are Montana employers looking for in applicants? The Basics: Unsurprisingly, basic skills top the list, since they are required for most jobs. Reading Comprehension, Active Listening, Speaking, Critical Thinking, and Writing occupy the top 5 spots. A person will acquire some skill in the basics from high school and work experience. Postsecondary education will give an applicant a competitive edge, regardless of major. College experience also shows a willingness to learn, fulfilling skill #6: Active Learning. #4 Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. #5 Writing Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience. #1 Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. #2 Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. #6 Active Learning Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making. #3 Speaking #7 Judgment & Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Talking to others to convey information effectively. #8 Mathematics Using mathematics to solve problems. #9 Science Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems. 16 Mathematics and Science also rank high on the list. Many high-wage occupations require a degree in math or science. For instance, Accountants and Auditors, Financial Examiners, Chemists, Microbiologists, and Wildlife Biologists all require varying levels of postsecondary education in math and science. Monitoring is a skill useful for people in management and analysis occupations such as Management Analysts, Medical and Health Services Managers, Natural Science Managers, Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts, and Market Research Analysts. However, the ability to assess the performance of oneself and others has applications in a wide variety of jobs. Educational, Vocational, and School Counselors, Postsecondary English and Literature Teachers, and Compliance Officers all benefit from this skill. Operations Analysis is the only technical skill to make the top fifteen. High importance is placed on this skill in occupations ranging from Computer Software Engineers and Network Systems Analysts to Natural Science Managers and Foresters. Operations Analysis made the list because it is required not only in high technology occupations, but in many other management and science fields. Occupations in technology tend to require high levels of other technical skills that did not make the list, such as Programming and Technology Design. #10 Complex Problem Solving Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions. #11 Learning Strategies trategies tegie Selecting and using training/ instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things. #12 Instructing Teaching others how to do something. Learning Strategies and Instructing skills can also be acquired in college, especially in Masters and Doctoral programs which give the opportunity for graduate students to teach lower level courses. Even if one is pursuing a career other than teaching, experience in a teaching assistantship proves valuable on a resume, since many professional positions require employees to train other employees, or to instruct the public. Some Dieticians and Nutritionalists, for example, travel to schools, workplaces, and other institutions, y giving presentations on how to eat smart and stay healthy. Most employers encourage lifetime learning, which may include personal research. Lawyers need d h to be highly skilled in Learning Strategies, since much of their work requires research, and they must keep current with the latest laws and legal precedents. #13 Monitoring Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. #14 Operations Analysis Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 #15 Coordination Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions. Adjusting actions in relation to others actions. j Who knows what new career paths the future will bring? The best source of job security in the new economy is the individual development of skills. Identifying the skills valued most by employers will help individuals to invest their training time wisely, and allow colleges and vo-techs to develop curriculums which will best benefit students seeking employment and businesses that need a labor force trained in the most applicable skills. 17 THE JOB SEARCH When most people think about looking for a job, they y think of newspaper want ads. The truth is that 80 to o 1 90% of all job openings are never advertised. ” You might ask, “Then how do people ever find jobs?” , The answer is Networking. In today’s job market, it really is all about who you know. If this doesn’t t seem fair, remember that there is nothing stopping g n you from getting out there and meeting people in s your field. In fact, that is your best bet when it comes to job hunting. Making Connections ” If you feel you’re not especially “well-connected,” o consider that everyone you know, from family to friends to teachers, are “connections.” Start your r u job search by telling everyone you know that you r are looking for a job. They have connections of their d own, and you never know who might have heard about a job opening. . But don’t stop with people you already know. Find out which companies hire workers in your r e chosen profession and introduce yourself to the human resources director, or whoever makes hiring g r decisions. Let them know you are interested in their g company, tell them what type of job you are looking r for, and ask whether any positions are available, or y will be available soon. Even if they don’t have any k openings, offer them a copy of your resume, and ask ! for a business card. You’ve just made a connection! t The next time a position opens up, they just might h remember you, especially if you check back with e them from time to time and let them know you are still interested. l Also consider joining a social or professional l organization. Chances are, someone in your local s rotary organization, church, or soccer club works e for a company that is hiring. Remember, the more l people you know, the more likely that someone will g give you the lead that lands you job. th give you the lead that lands you a job. 1 As important as it is to make professional connections, don’t rule out job postings altogether. There are many different ways to look for jobs, and the more methods you try, the more likely you are to succeed. Internet Job Search Engines The Internet offers an ideal way to bring employers and employees together because information can be shared so quickly and easily. There are thousands of web sites on the Internet where you can post your resume or look for openings. Two of your best sources are Montana JobLINC at www.mtjoblinc.com or Job Central at www.jobcentral.com/states.asp. Job Service Workforce Centers Some of the most valuable resources for Montana job seekers are the Job Service Workforce Centers located throughout the state. Not only can they help you find job openings, Job Service staff can help you identify your skills, write resumes and cover letters, prepare for interviews, provide clerical and aptitude testing, and offer career counseling for those not sure of their future employment plans. They also have computers and software to aid your search, as well as printers, telephones, fax machines, and a library of books and career videos. If you utilize your local Job Service Workforce Center, remember to BE PREPARED. You can expect to fill out a job application or register on the web, so you’ll need to bring the following information: • • • • • • Your current address and phone number Your Social Security Number Names, addresses, and phone numbers of previous employers Dates of previous employment Names, addresses and phone numbers of three personal references Other relevant information, such as your driver’s license number, union cards, copies of transcripts, or military discharge papers MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 18 From the North Dakota Career Resource Network’s “Career Outlook 2005-2006” www.NDCRN.com. You will also be interviewed by a Job Service consultant to determine your qualifications. There’s a chance you’ll be sent to a job interview directly from the Job Service Workforce Center, so dress appropriately. Montana’s Job Service Workforce Centers can be found in the following locations: Anaconda 307 East Park Anaconda, MT 59711 Phone: 406-563-3444 Fax: 406-563-7827 Job Hot-Line: 406-563-7826 E-mail: anacondajs@mt.gov Glasgow 74 4th Street North Glasgow, MT 59230 Phone: 406-228-9369 Fax: 406-228-8793 Job Hot-Line: 406-228-9523 E-mail: glasgowjsc@mt.gov Kalispell 427 First Avenue E. Kalispell, MT 59901 Phone: 406-758-6200 Fax: 406-758-6290 Job Hot-Line: 406-758-6297 TDD: 406-758-6224 E-mail: kalispelljsc@mt.gov Polson 417-B Main P.O. Box 970 Polson, MT 59860 Phone: 406-883-7880 Fax: 406-883-4564 Job Hot-Line: 406-883-3311 E-mail: polsonjsc@mt.gov Glendive Billings 2121-B Rosebud Drive Billings, MT 59102 Phone: 406-652-3080 Fax: 406-652-0444 E-mail: billingsjsc@mt.gov 211 South Kendrick Glendive, MT 59330 Phone: 406-377-3314 Fax: 406-377-5831 Job Hot-Line: 406-377-5823 E-mail: glendivejsc@mt.gov Lewistown 300 First Avenue North Lewistown, MT 59457 Phone: 406-538-8701 Fax: 406-538-7249 Job Hot-Line: 406-538-5263 E-mail: lewistownjsc@mt.gov Shelby 202 Main St. Shelby, MT 59474 Phone: 406-434-5161 Fax: 406-434-2351 Job Hot-Line: 406-434-5045 E-mail: shelbyjsc@mt.gov Bozeman 121 North Willson Bozeman, MT 59715 Phone: 406-582-9200 Fax: 406-582-9210 E-mail: bozemanjsc@mt.gov Great Falls 1018 7th Street S. Great Falls, MT 59405 Phone: 406-791-5800 Fax: 406-791-5889 Job Hot-Line: 406-453-5556 TDD: 406-791-5882 E-mail: greatfallsjsc@mt.gov Libby 417 Mineral, Suite 4 Libby, MT 59923 Phone: 406-293-6282 Fax: 406-293-5134 Job Hot-Line: 406-293-6282 Press option 1 E-mail: libbyjsc@mt.gov Sidney 211 North Central Sidney, MT 59270 Phone: 406-433-1204 Fax: 406-433-7453 Job Hot-Line: 406-433-6665 E-mail: sidneyjsc@mt.gov Butte 2201 White Blvd. Butte, MT 59702 Phone: 406-494-0300 Fax: 406-494-5481 Job Hot-line: 406-494-0338 E-mail: buttejsc@mt.gov Hamilton 333 W. Main Street Hamilton, MT 59840 Phone: 406-363-1822 Fax: 406-363-1823 Job Hot-Line: 406-363-2726 E-mail: hamiltonjsc@mt.gov Thompson Falls Livingston 220 E. Park Livingston, MT 59047 Phone: 406-222-0520 Fax: 406-222-1593 Job Hot-Line: 406-222-0533 E-mail: livingstonjsc@mt.gov 2504 Tradewinds Way P.O. Box 669 Thompson Falls, MT 59873 Phone: 406-827-3472 Fax: 406-827-3327 Job Hot-Line: 406-827-4562 E-mail: ThompsonFallsJSC@ mt.gov Cut Bank 501 East Main Cut Bank, MT 59427 Phone: 406-873-2191 Fax: 406-873-5393 Job Hot-Line: 406-873-4407 E-mail: cutbankjsc@mt.gov Havre 160 First Avenue Havre, MT 59501 Phone: 406-265-5847 Fax: 406-265-1386 Job Hot-Line: 406-265-1587 E-mail: havrejsc@mt.gov Miles City 12 North 10th Street Box 1786 Miles City, MT 59301 Phone: 406-232-8340 Fax: 406-232-6270 Job Hot-Line: 406-232-6350 E-mail: milescityjsc@mt.gov Wolf Point 201 Main Street Wolf Point, MT 59201 Phone: 406-653-1720 Fax: 406-653-1196 Job Hot-Line: 406-653-1194 E-mail: wolfpointjsc@mt.gov MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Dillon 730 North Montana CL #4 Dillon, MT 59725 Phone: 406-683-4259 Fax: 406-683-2903 Job Hot-Line: 406-683-4737 E-mail: dillonjsc@mt.gov Helena 715 Front Street Helena, MT 59601 Phone: 406-447-3200 Fax: 406-447-3224 Job Hot-Line: 406-447-3222 E-mail: helenajsc@mt.gov Missoula 539 S. Third Street W P.O. Box 5027 Missoula, MT 59806 Phone: 406-728-7060 Fax: 406-721-7094 E-mail: missoulajsc@mt.gov For links to the individual Job Service Workforce Centers’ websites, go to http://wsd.dli.mt.gov/ service/officelist.asp 19 In most aspects of life, modesty is an important quality to possess. But it has no place in your job search. Chances are, your dream job will have many qualified applicants. If you want to convince the prospective employer that you are the best fit for the position, you must learn to market yourself. Don’t downplay your accomplishments. Advertise them. But what if your work history is less than spectacular. Perhaps you have no prior work experience, or you’re been raising a family and haven’t been employed in ten years? This is when marketing yourself becomes crucial. You can make up for your lack of work experience by focussing on your skills. More and more employers consider the “soft skills” the most important ones to look for in a prospective employee. “Soft skills” are personal qualities, habits, and attitudes that are not necessarily acquired from work experience, but ones that make you a good employee. Some of the most important ones include reliability, flexibility, problem-solving, and communication skills. One of the first things you should do to prepare for your job search is to identify your skills. Start by listing the following: fo g listing the following: Once you know what skills you have, you can begin matching them to specific jobs. Once again, MCIS can help. It allows you to select a specific occupation and find out which skills are the most important in that job. Knowing what skills an employer is looking for, and being able to match them up with your experience allows you to customize your resume to suit each position for which you apply. The following scenarios will demonstrate how this is done. Situation #1 You are a high school student applying for a job in a retail store. You have no prior work experience because you have been so actively involved in extracurricular activities, such as student government, forensics, and volunteer work at the local animal shelter. You may think you have nothing to market, but think again (see box below). For every check mark, you have another skill you can advertise in your cover letter and resume, as well as in the job interview. Marketing yourself in this way will give you the advantage over equallyexperienced candidates who did not make the same effort. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 • • • • • • Any previous employment Volunteer work Education Hobbies Day-to-day tasks Other experience involving skills Student Government Teamwork Working with the public Listening Speaking Information gathering Evaluating Synthesizing Planning Analyzing Negotiating Leading Decision Making Managing Resources Forensics Speaking Listening Verifying information Competitiveness Independent work Information gathering Persuading Using knowledge Now think about the tasks and duties involved in each of the items on your list. What skills did you learn and utilize for each activity? If you’re having trouble recognizing your skills, the Montana Career Information System (MCIS) is a great resource. MCIS’s Micro-SKILLS program1 takes you through the entire process of evaluating your skills. 1 Animal Shelter Dependability Teamwork Working with the public Assisting/caring The Micro-SKILLS assessment can be accessed through MCIS at www.smartaboutcollege.org. 20 Situation #2 You spent many years raising a family and now you need to get back into the workforce. You haven’t worked for an employer in ten years so giving work-related references to a prospective employer is hard to do. But remember, raising a family takes a multitude of skills that often are underappreciated. If you were to apply for a job as a bank teller, what skills would be transferable? The figure below shows the top 35 skills for bank tellers. Notice how many match the skills that the individual in situation #2 demonstrates that she possesses (see box to the right). If you take the time to do this type of selfexploration, not only will you uncover skills you didn’t know you had, you will gain confidence in your ability to market yourself to an employer. Once you develop this skill you will use it over and over again throughout your working life. Household Finances Record keeping Attention to detail Categorizing Verifying information Using computers Calculating Estimating Budgeting Math reasoning Evaluating Analyzing Using knowledge Planning Decision making Managing resources Raising Children Dependability Flexibilty Assisting/Caring Stamina Rapid Response Stress Tolerance Listening Advising Safety of others Directing/leading Impact of responsibility BANK TELLER TOP 35 SKILLS MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 21 Screen shot from MCIS’s Micro-SKILLS assessment WHAT IS A COVER LETTER? A cover letter is a letter of introduction and expression of interest that you send to a prospective employer, along with your resume. Cover letters are, in some ways, more important than resumes. While resumes summarize your qualifications, cover letters should sell you to the employer. You want the letter to convince the employer to take action on your resume and invite you for an interview. • • • • • • The cover letter should be addressed to a specific person. If you don’t know the person’s name and title, call and ask. The cover letter should briefly explain why you are interested in the company and what you can contribute to the team. A cover letter should not merely repeat the contents of the resume; it should highlight only the most important parts of your resume, and expand on them. The cover letter should be brief and to the point. It should not go over one page. Don’t use jargon or be too technical. on t use jargon or be too technical. g A cover letter has three sections: the introduction, middle, and ending. Normally each section is limited to one brief paragraph. The most important point to get across in the introduction (first paragraph) is your reason for writing. (See sample cover letter.) The middle (second paragraph) covers your main qualifications and accomplishments, and the reasons you are interested in the job. The ending (last paragraph) is a request for an interview. One option is to restate your interest in the job or that you will call next week to see about setting a time for an interview. It is always important to follow up your letter with a phone call to make sure they received your application packet and to see where they are in the hiring process. March 29, 2007 Mr. Kenneth D. Wilson Personnel Manager Kwick Litho Service, Inc. 1405 Bridge Street Missoula, MT 59851 Dear Mr. Wilson: Yesterday, I talked with Mark Andersen, your representative at the Missoula job fair. From our conversation, I became very interested in applying for the offset press operator position. Kwick Litho Service, Inc. is a leader in the full-service printing operation and I am eager to offer my skills in graphic design and production. Currently, I am enrolled in graphic production classes at The University of Montana. My course work has included a full range of printing tasks including design, three-color offset and web press operation, and the use of pre-sensitized and direct-image plates. After completing these courses next month, I would like the opportunity to put my training into practice in a position such as the one that you have advertised. Would it be possible to schedule a time when I might visit you? I would like to talk with you about my qualifications and my interest in working for Kwick Litho Service. Sincerely yours, (skip four spaces for your signature) Daniel Heidelburg 304 Newbury Street Missoula, MT 58512 Phone: 406.555.6789 • • MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 • • Example letter created by intoCareers of the University of Oregon. 22 A resume is a summary of your work experience and skills that employers look at to decide whether or not to grant you an interview. It is not a list of all the jobs you have ever held, but a statement of qualifications tailored to suit the specific job for which you are applying. SAMPLE CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME GAIL BELLCAMP 212 Maple Lane Helena, MT 59624 (406) 555-2377 (home) (406) 555-2389 (message) OBJECTIVE Full-time work as an Assistant Accountant. EXPERIENCE TYPES TYPES OF RESUMES Chronological Resume The chronological resume lists work experience in reverse chronological order, listing your most recent experience first. This is the most popular type of resume, and employers are most familiar with this style. This style is good to use when you have a steady work history and your work experience is relevant to the job you are seeking. Accounting Clerk, Helena College of Technology. February 1998 to present • Maintained accounts payable and receivable, general ledger, and payroll for an operations budget of $700,000. • Implemented new ledger process and management procedures that saved employee and management time. Machine Forming Operator. ABC Company, May 1990 to October 1998. • Read complex blueprint specifications to assemble, install, and align dies in press. • Inspected work for conformance to specifications and made necessary adjustments • Received Zero Percent Error Award, 1996, 1997. Machine Tool Cutting Operator. ABC Company, March 1986 to May 1990. • Planned work process and sequence of operations using blueprints and layouts. • Set up and operated automated cutting machines. • Performed routine maintenance, decreasing breakdowns by 40%. EDUCATION Associate of Applied Science, Accounting Technology. July 1989 to December 1989. Montana State University, Billings, MT. COMPUTER SKILLS Lotus 1-2-3, Microsoft Excel. REFERENCES Available upon request. Functional Resume Functional resumes summarize and stress skills and abilities, rather than your work history. This type of resume is good if you have little work experience, do not have a steady work history, or want to change careers. RESUME WRITING TIPS RESUME WRITING TIPS • State a specific career objective. • List your achievements. They are more impressive than vague qualities like “good work ethic.” SAMPLE FUNCTIONAL OR SKILLS RESUME JAN MOSSIER 1140 Franklin Boulevard Gardiner, Montana 59030 Home Phone: (406) 555-3773 Message Phone: (406) 555-2224 OBJECTIVE To gain a technician assistant position in computer manufacturing. SUMMARY OF SKILLS Able to solve and repair electronic equipment. Contribute to teams and create good work relationships. Energetic, hardworking, willing to learn. Basic understanding of IBM. EXPERIENCE • Keep it brief and to the point. One page of wellorganized career highlights looks better than three pages of unnecessary details. • • • • MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 • Appearance is important. Make sure your resume looks good by not crowding the page with long paragraphs. Print it on high-quality resume paper, and proofread it several times to make sure it is perfect. ELECTRICAL SKILLS • Built a TV scrambler from a circuit board in electronics class. • Rewired lamps, repaired plumbing and appliances in home maintenance projects. • Operated power tools (saws, drills, sanders) to cut and help frame buildings. BUSINESS SKILLS • Tracked and priced inventory with team to improve product availability to customers in a grocery store. • Greeted customers and helped them to find hard-to-locate items. Cashiered and calculated cash flow at the end of each shift. COMPUTER SKILLS • Set up and entered personal budget on Excel, using IBM computer. EMPLOYMENT HISTORY Stock Clerk/Cashier. Sunny’s Market Construction Helper. The Builder’s Group EDUCATION Gardiner High School, Gardiner MT Related courses: drafting, basic electronics, management • Try not to use the expressions “responsible for” or “duties included.” Instead use action verbs such as “assisted customers,” and “repaired engines.” 1999-Present Summers 1996-1998 • Be honest and don’t exaggerate your qualifications. Employers check your references, and you can lose your job if you are hired based on false statements. 1999 Example resumes created by intoCareers of the University of Oregon. 23 The interview is your opportunity to personally convince the employer you are the best person for the job. TTheyS FalreadyA your resume, now they want to see how you conduct yourself in person. The most IP have OR read Commonly asked interview questions: Tell me a little about yourself What are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? Why do you want to work here? Tell me about your most recent job. Why did you leave your last job? important thing to do in the interview is to project a positive attitude. According to employers, promising employees are those who are enthusiastic, friendly, motivated, and willing to accept tasks pleasantly. Show your interviewer that you are this kind of employee. RESEARCH THE COMPANY Find out as much as you can about the company EXPLAIN YOUR EXAMPLES IN DETAIL Use the S.T.A.R. method to answer questions* LOOK YOUR BEST Your clothes should be neat and appropriate for the working environment You should be well-groomed No heavy perfume or cologne Modest jewelry BE PREPARED Bring a copy of your resume, references, samples of work if appropriate ARRIVE EARLY Make sure you know how to get to the interview and arrive 10 minutes early BODY LANGUAGE Look the interviewer in the eye, but don’t stare Sit up straight and act alert Don’t chew gum or smoke Smile when appropriate BE ENTHUSIASTIC Show genuine interest in the job USE DISCRETION Be honest in your answers but steer away from troublesome areas ASK QUESTIONS Ask questions that will help you decide if the position is suitable for you SUBJECTS TO AVOID: Don’t mention financial or personal problems Don’t talk about what was wrong with previous employers Don’t mention salary or benefits REMEMBER TO THANK YOUR INTERVIEWER * The S.T.A.R. Method: MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Situation Explain the situation Task Explain your task or role Action What action did you take? Results What resulted from your action? 24 WHAT’S KEEPING YOU FROM YOUR CAREER? Finding a job is not easy, and many of us face additional obstacles to being hired. Whether your obstacle is a disability, your age, or your situation in life, resources exist to help you find employment. The table below lists some of those resources. Group Adults Facing Barriers to Employment Description Adults (22 years and older) who face barriers to employment and who are seeking assistance under the Workforce Investment Act. Where can I go? Statewide Workforce Programs Ph: (406) 444-4571 Fax: (406) 444-3037 E-mail: wia@mt.gov www.wsd.dli.mt.gov Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) Ph: (406) 444-4443 www.opi.mt.gov/ABE/Index.html Adults (16 and older) who are not enrolled Adults without a in, or are not required to be enrolled in, high school diploma secondary school, who lack sufficient or GED mastery of basic skills, a high school diploma, or basic English skills. Blind Persons and Individuals with Physical or Mental Disabilities Persons with any physical or mental disability that makes it difficult to find or keep a job. Disability Services Division 111 Sanders Suite 307 PO Box 4210 Helena, MT 59604-4210 1-877-296-1197 (Toll free) www.dphhs.mt.gov/dsd WIA Dislocated Worker Program Ph: (406) 444-4571 Fax: (406) 444-3037 E-mail: wia@mt.gov www.wsd.dli.mt.gov/wia/ wiadislocatedworker.asp Employment Relations Division Department of Labor and Industry P.O. Box 8011 Helena, MT 59604-8011 Ph: (406) 444-7751 or 444-3089 Montana Senior & Long Term Care 1-800-332-2272 dphhs.mt.gov/sltc/ Dislocated Workers Individuals who have been terminated or laid off generally due to plant closures or downsizing. Injured Workers Workers who have been injured on the job Older Workers Individuals 55 years or older who are economically disadvantaged. Veterans who have served 180+ consecutive days on active duty, were released due to a related illness or injury, or have been in the National Guard or Reserves and were called to active duty during a war. Individuals who have been dependent upon someone else for support and who through death, disability of a spouse, or divorce no longer have such support. In school youth ages 14 to 21, and out-ofschool youth ages 16 to 21. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Veterans Contact your local Job Service Workforce Center (see page 19 for locations). www.wsd.dli.mt.gov State Displaced Homemaker Program Ph: (406) 444-4571 Fax: (406) 444-3037 E-mail: wia@mt.gov www.wsd.dli.mt.gov WIA Youth Program Ph: (406) 444-4571 Fax: (406) 444-3037 E-mail: wia@mt.gov www.wsd.dli.mt.gov Displaced Homemakers Youth 25 If there’s one message to take away from this guide, it’s that getting the kind of career you want takes planning. Whether you already know what you want to do, or have no idea what kinds of jobs are out there, our Occupations Guide will help you make informed career decisions. Here’s how it works: The Occupations Guide lists Montana jobs with significant employment levels (200 jobs or more) and breaks them into six major “Career Clusters,” or groupings of interrelated occupations. Some of these clusters are further broken down into occupational groups. Each section begins with an introduction that explains what kind of jobs and activities are included, and what the employment outlook is for that occupational group. Occupation Interest Profile Description MONTANA’S SIX CAREER CLUSTERS: Arts & Communications Business, Management, & Information Systems Environmental & Agricultural Systems Health Sciences Human Services & Resources Industrial, Manufacturing, & Engineering Systems The bulk of the occupations guide section consists of tables that provide information on specific occupations within each cluster. The occupations are ordered by the level of training they require. A sample table appears below: Wages Outlook Long-Term On-the-Job Training Compliance officers, except agriculture, construction, health & safety, and transportation High-end: $54,810 CR Examine, evaluate, and investigate eligibility for or conformity with laws and regulations governing contract compliance of licenses and permits, and other compliance and enforcement inspection activities not classified elsewhere. Median: Low-end: $0 $41,100 $32,800 $60K $80K $100K $120K $20K $40K Projected Average Annual Openings: 19 Use the Interest Profile to match your interest code (see pages 5-7) to specific occupations. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Find out about the duties and activites of jobs you never even knew existed. Even if you think you know what you want to do, you may find an occupation even better suited to your interests and abilities Can you have the kind of lifestyle you want working in your chosen profession? Use the wages chart to find out. OUTLOOK KEY MUCH MUCH FASTER GROWTH THAN THE THE STATE AVERAGE FASTER GROWTH THAN THE STATE AVERAGE SAME GROWTH RATE AS THE STATE AVERAGE Is this occupation growing? How fast? The symbols in the outlook column provide a visual guide to the growth rate for each occupation (see Outlook Key below). This column also notes the projected number of job openings each year. SLOWER GROWTH THAN THE STATE AVERAGE MUCH MUCH SLOWER GROWTH THAN THE THE STATE AVERAGE DECLINING OCCUPATION Occupation cluster descriptions, national employment outlook, and pathways text created by intoCareers, a unit of the University of Oregon. Copyright © 2005, University of Oregon. All rights reserved. 26 ARTS, A/V TECHNOLOGY, AND COMMUNICATIONS OCCUPATIONS Do you like to perform in front of an audience? Are you interested in working in the movies or television? Do you like to work with technology? Is artistic expression important to you? Are you visually oriented? Does computer animation interest you? Are you involved in school or community theater? If you are interested in working in this cluster, you have two avenues. One is to be the performer or artist. The other is to work behind the scenes to make the performance or publication happen. As a reporter, actor, or fine artist, you would use your creative talents. To assure that a concert or magazine is successful, you would use computers and sound equipment. The occupations in this cluster allow you to use your creativity, talent, and technical skills. National Employment Outlook The job opportunities in broadcasting, journalism, and printing will be limited in the future. Most of the jobs will result when workers retire or go to other jobs. Increased use of technology means fewer workers will be needed. Many people are attracted to these occupations because of the glamour of the jobs. As a result, there are many applicants for broadcasting jobs. There have been changes in current laws regulating ownership of broadcast stations. Many stations are combined under one network and fewer workers are needed. You may find more job opportunities in films. More movies and programs are needed for the cable and satellite television channels. Most of the jobs will be for those working behind the scenes. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Pathways Audio-Video Communications Technology In the Audio-Video Communications Technology y pathway, you work with the equipment used in producing sounds and images. You would make sure the e equipment is available and working. You might work k for hotels, convention centers, schools, movie theatres, and stadiums. Another option is to work for companies that rent or sell sound and video equipment. Broadcast, Film, and Journalism In the Broadcast, Film, and Journalism pathway, you would make sure that radio and television programs and movies reach the public. You could prepare the content and make broadcasts. During the show, you could record or transmit the program. In addition, you could be involved with the publication of newspapers and magazines. As a writer or photog- 27 rapher, you would produce the stories or articles. As an editor, you would plan the content and assign the work. Performing Arts As a worker in the Performing Arts pathway, you would be responsible for putting on plays and concerts. You could coordinate all the activities associated with putting on a concert or play. Or you might represent the actors or musicians to help them find jobs. Another option is to put on the live entertainment. Printing Technology The Printing Technology process has three stages. During the first stage, you would prepare material for printing presses. You would transform text and pictures into digital images or finished pages. Then you would make printing plates of the pages. During the next stage, you would prepare, operate, and maintain the printing presses in a pressroom. You would use computers to perform the tasks electronically. During the third stage, you would join the printed sheets into a finished product. Telecommunications You would focus on the contact between computer and communications equipment in the Telecommunications pathway. Telecommunications equipment is computerized and can communicate a variety of information, including data, graphics, and video. You would set up, operate, and maintain this complicated equipment Visual Arts Visual artists create art to communicate ideas, thoughts, or feelings. You would use a variety of methods such as painting, sculpting, and illustrating. You would create art to satisfy your need for self-expression. Or you might use your artistic skills at corporations; retail stores; and advertising, design, and publishing firms. Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $30,945 Music directors and composers AES Conduct, direct, plan, and lead instrumental or vocal performances by musical groups, such as orchestras, choirs, and glee clubs. Includes arrangers, composers, choral directors, and orchestrators. Median: $23,112 Low-end: $15,768 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $42,468 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Graphic designers AE Design or create graphics to meet specific commercial or promotional needs, such as packaging, displays, or logos. May use a variety of mediums to achieve artistic or decorative effects. Median: $31,984 Low-end: $25,582 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 37 High-end: $51,883 Public relations specialists AIE Engage in promoting or creating good will for individuals, groups, or organizations by writing or selecting favorable publicity material and releasing it through various communications media. May prepare and arrange displays, and make speeches. Median: $40,880 Low-end: $34,546 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 24 High-end: $50,903 Writers and authors EAS Originate and prepare written material, such as scripts, stories, advertisements, and other material. Median: $43,978 Low-end: $30,217 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 29 28 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Long-Term On-The-Job Training Play one or more musical instruments or entertain by singing songs in recital, in accompaniment, or as a member of an orchestra, band, or other musical group. Musical performers may entertain on-stage, radio, TV, film, video, or record in studios. Musicians and singers AE Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: High-end: $43,700 13 Photographers AI Photograph persons, subjects, merchandise, or other commercial products. May develop negatives and produce finished prints. Median: $29,053 Low-end: $20,734 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 14 Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training High-end: $33,383 Printing machine operators REC Set up or operate various types of printing machines, such as offset, letterset, intaglio, or gravure presses or screen printers to produce print on paper or other materials. Median: $26,712 Low-end: $22,603 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 16 CAN’T CAN’T FIND THE OCCUPATION YOU’RE LOOKING FOR? Can’t find a certain occupation in this guide? Or perhaps you want to learn more about one you did find? Try the Montana Career Information System (MCIS), a comprehensive guide to Montana occupations and a career planning tool that provides detailed information on more than 497 occupations, 120 programs of study, and Montana wages, employment, and outlook data. It also offers a scholarship and financial aid search. MCIS is available free of charge at www.smartaboutcollege.org. Also check out the Montana Career Resource Network page at MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 www.careers.mt.gov. Features like “Occupation Explorer” will help you find information on specific jobs, including current and projected employment levels, skills needed, tasks performed, training programs available, and more. Other resources let you download career publications, and even search America’s Job Bank for job openings in your area. 29 THIS CLUSTER INCLUDES: Business, Management, & Administration Occupations Finance Occupations Hospitality & Tourism Occupations Information Technology Occupations Marketing, Sales, and Service Occupations BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATION OCCUPATIONS Do you enjoy working with other people? Are you good at working with numbers? Do you like to plan and organize activities? Have you started your own business? Do you keep your checkbook balanced? Are you an officer of an organization? MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 30 If you are interested in Business, Management, and Administration, there are many career options. You may provide the needed support to keep a business in operation. Or you might keep track of the expenses and income. You could manage the financial activities of a business. Another option is to be sure that a business has qualified employees who are trained to do their jobs. Or after years of education or experience, you might direct the operations of a business. National Employment Outlook There will be job opportunities in business, management, and administration in the future. Most of the opportunities will be in management. New management jobs will be added. Other openings will be the result of workers retiring or leaving their jobs. To qualify for these higher paying jobs, you will probably have to attend college and have several years of work experience. The increased use of technology in the storage and use of information will mean fewer job openings in some pathways in this cluster. Businesses will need fewer employees to do support work. Business owners will be able to do their own business analysis using the latest software programs. Pathways Management Employees working in management do a variety of activities to keep a business in operation. The size of the company affects the work you might do as the manager. In a large company, you might supervise other managers. In a small company, you might directly supervise all the employees. Or you might direct the work in one area of a business such as marketing or finance. As a manager, there could be many tasks to your job. You might build relationships with people outside the company or department and with employees. You might negotiate with or hire employees. Another part of the job might be to assure there are equipment, supplies, and money to operate the business. Business Financial Management and Accounting Employees in the Business Financial Management and Accounting pathway use general accounting systems. You would use the systems to prepare bills, taxes, and reports. Also, you would help make important business decisions. Human Resources In the Human Resources pathway, you would be responsible for finding and keeping employees. To do this, you would interview and hire the most qualified applicant. In addition, you would have to be familiar Interest Profile with labor laws and wages and benefits. Your duties might include providing training and doing things to keep employees happy. Business Analysis If a business is experiencing problems, the owner might contact a business analyst for help. To find solutions to the problems, you would first carefully study the details of the business operations. Once a solution is developed, you would determine which is best for the business. In the final step, you would make a proposal to the business owner. Marketing People working in the Marketing pathway sell products and services. You would do market research for new products. Or you might sell the product to customers. Once the product is sold, you might make sure the product is delivered and the customer is satisfied. Administration and Information Support If you were to work in the Administration and Information Support pathway, you would manage the activities of an office. You would use computers to perform clerical activities. One of your goals would be to ensure that information is collected and shared with staff and clients. Occupation Description Wages Outlook MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $67,216 Administrative services managers ECS Plan, direct, or coordinate supportive services of an organization, such as recordkeeping, mail distribution, telephone operator/ receptionist, and other office support services. May oversee facilities planning and maintenance and custodial operations. Determine and formulate policies and provide the overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within the guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities. Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of companies or public and private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources. Median: $48,110 Low-end: $37,146 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 21 High-end: $117,358 Chief executives Median: $73,203 ECS Low-end: $39,959 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 48 High-end: $91,821 General and operations managers Median: $67,298 ECS Low-end: $48,586 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 273 31 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $78,351 Management analysts CEI Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplifications and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Direct the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics. Median: $59,958 Low-end: $48,677 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 19 High-end: $88,684 Median: $64,523 Sales managers EC Low-end: $48,722 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 Bachelor’s Degree Employment, recruitment, and placement specialists High-end: $41,615 Median: $36,804 ESC Recruit and place workers. Low-end: $32,107 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 Work Experience in a Related Occupation First-line supervisors/managers of office and administrative support workers First-line supervisors/managers of personal service workers High-end: $54,270 ECS Supervise and coordinate the activities of clerical and administrative support workers. Median: $39,833 Low-end: $31,709 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 111 High-end: $37,296 R Supervise and coordinate activities of personal service workers, such as supervisors of flight attendants, hairdressers, or caddies. Median: $29,670 Low-end: $23,350 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training Executive secretaries and administrative assistants Provide high-level administrative support by conducting research, preparing statistical reports, handling information requests, and performing clerical functions such as preparing correspondence, receiving visitors, arranging conference calls, and scheduling meetings. Perform routine clerical and administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to callers. High-end: $36,192 Median: $29,626 CR Low-end: $24,791 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 228 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $29,562 Secretaries, except legal, medical, and executive Median: $24,027 CE Low-end: $19,202 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 300 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $26,645 File clerks CE File correspondence, cards, invoices, receipts, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested. Median: $22,145 Low-end: $17,697 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 10 Human resources assistants, except payroll and timekeeping High-end: $37,659 CE Compile and keep personnel records. Record data for each employee, such as address, weekly earnings, absences, amount of sales or production, supervisory reports on ability, and date of and reason for termination. Compile and type reports. Median: $31,069 Low-end: $25,574 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 14 32 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Shot-Term On-the-Job Training (cont.) Mail clerks and mail machine operators, except postal service High-end: $25,766 CR Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Use hand or mail handling machines to time stamp, open, read, sort, and route incoming mail; and address, seal, stamp, fold, stuff, and affix postage to outgoing mail or packages. Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual organizations. Coordinate and expedite the flow of work and materials within or between departments of an establishment according to production schedule. Duties include reviewing and distributing production, work, and shipment schedules. Answer inquiries and obtain information for general public, customers, visitors, and other interested parties. Provide information regarding activities conducted at establishment; location of departments, offices, and employees within organization. Operate telephone business systems equipment or switchboards to relay incoming, outgoing, and interoffice calls. May supply information to callers and record messages. Median: $20,567 Low-end: $17,367 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 High-end: $27,943 Median: $22,708 Office clerks, general CE Low-end: $18,101 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 231 High-end: $52,262 Production, planning, and expediting clerks Median: $40,174 RC Low-end: $29,554 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 High-end: $26,089 Median: $22,676 Receptionists and information clerks CE Low-end: $19,304 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 124 High-end: $27,721 Switchboard operators, including answering service Median: $23,742 ECS Low-end: $20,960 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 12 FINANCE OCCUPATIONS Are you the treasurer of a club or organization? Do you enjoy working with numbers? Do you balance your checkbook? Are you interested in the stock market? Do you like to operate calculators? Are you good at following detailed work plans? MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 In the occupations in the Finance cluster, you would keep track of money. You might provide financial services to a business or individual. Your work could include maintaining records or giving advice to business executives on how to operate their business. You could work in financial planning, banking, or insurance. National Employment Outlook Job opportunities in banking and insurance are expected to increase slowly. Most job openings will be the result of employees leaving their jobs or retiring. As the use of technology increases, fewer workers will be needed to do administrative and support tasks. More people will be completing their insurance and banking transactions on the computer. In addition, smaller banks are merging into larger banks and need fewer employees. Insurance companies are using the Internet to sell their products and need fewer sales agents. Also, some insurance companies are reducing the number of employees because of budget problems. 33 Employment in financial planning and investment is expected to grow. More people are investing in the stock market. Also, people are more interested in investing in markets in foreign countries. As people get older, they are looking for assistance in planning for their retirement. Pathways Financial and Investment Planning In the Financial and Investment Planning pathway, you would help businesses and individuals make decisions about their investments. Business Financial Management In the Business Financial Management pathway, you would use general accounting systems to prepare financial reports. You would use information to help businesses make financial decisions. Banking and Related Services Employees working in the Banking and Related Services pathway work with individuals and businesses. You would provide loans, credit, and payment services. Insurance Services Employees in the Insurance Services pathway provide protection to individuals and businesses. You would sell policies to guard against financial losses resulting from a variety of situations. Wages Outlook Occupation Interest Profile Description Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $88,665 Financial managers EC Plan, direct, and coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment. Median: $65,491 Low-end: $48,395 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $63,536 Accountants and auditors CEI Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records for the purpose of giving advice or preparing statements. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data. Median: $47,240 Low-end: $37,084 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 154 High-end: $64,991 Insurance sales agents ES Sell life, property, casualty, health, automotive, or other types of insurance. May refer clients to independent brokers, work as independent broker, or be employed by an insurance company. Median: $37,890 Low-end: $27,960 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 85 High-end: $67,328 Loan officers ESC Evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of commercial, real estate, or credit loans. Advise borrowers on financial status and methods of payments. Includes mortgage loan officers and agents, collection analysts, loan servicing officers, and loan underwriters. Advise clients on financial plans utilizing knowledge of tax and investment strategies, securities, insurance, pension plans, and real estate. Duties include assessing clients' assets, liabilities, cash flow, insurance coverage, and tax status. Median: $48,676 Low-end: $36,105 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 37 High-end: $77,472 Personal financial advisors Securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents Median: $46,125 SEC Low-end: $35,483 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 33 High-end: $87,560 ESC Buy and sell securities in investment and trading firms, or call upon businesses and individuals to sell financial services. Provide financial services, such as loan, tax, and securities counseling. Median: $35,688 Low-end: $28,097 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 37 34 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $63,879 Cost estimators CE Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured. Median: $46,627 Low-end: $24,575 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 40 Long-Term On-The-Job Training Claims adjusters, examiners, and investigators Review settled claims to determine that payments and settlements have been made in accordance with company practices and procedures, ensuring that proper methods have been followed. Report overpayments, underpayments, and other irregularities. High-end: $61,562 Median: $47,263 EC Low-end: $30,876 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 43 Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training High-end: $31,890 Billing and posting clerks and machine operators Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks Insurance claims and policy processing clerks Payroll and timekeeping clerks CRS Compile, compute, and record billing, accounting, statistical, and other numerical data for billing purposes. Prepare billing invoices for services rendered or for delivery or shipment of goods. Median: $27,626 Low-end: $23,305 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 48 High-end: $35,830 CE Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for use in maintaining accounting records. Process new insurance policies, modifications to existing policies, and claims forms. Obtain information from policyholders to verify the accuracy and completeness of information on claims forms, applications and related documents, and company records. Median: $28,755 Low-end: $22,498 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 515 High-end: $32,898 Median: $29,013 CR Low-end: $24,841 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 High-end: $34,910 C Compile and post employee time and payroll data. May compute employees' time worked, production, and commission. May compute and post wages and deductions. May prepare paychecks. Median: $29,582 Low-end: $24,949 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 High-end: $35,332 Tax preparers CE Prepare tax returns for individuals or small businesses but do not have the background or responsibilities of an accredited or certified public accountant. Median: $27,540 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Low-end: $19,605 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 6 High-end: $51,050 Title examiners, abstractors, and searchers CE Search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance details for a variety of purposes. May compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms. Median: $38,691 Low-end: $31,376 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 Short-Term On-The-Job Training Bill and account collectors Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account, and preparing statements to credit department if customer fails to respond. High-end: $34,804 Median: $28,377 ECS Low-end: $23,859 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 51 35 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Short-Term On-The-Job Training (cont.) High-end: $31,560 Loan interviewers and clerks CES Interview loan applicants to elicit information; investigate applicants' backgrounds and verify references; prepare loan request papers; and forward findings, reports, and documents to appraisal department. Review loan papers to ensure completeness. Median: $26,913 Low-end: $23,120 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 23 High-end: $26,673 Tellers CE Receive and pay out money. Keep records of money and negotiable instruments involved in a financial institution's various transactions. Median: $23,277 Low-end: $20,114 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 161 HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM OCCUPATIONS Can you talk easily with all kinds of people? Do you participate in athletic activities? Do you enjoy travel? Have you worked in a restaurant? Do you like to cook? Do you like to plan family recreational activities? In the Hospitality and Tourism cluster, you could work in a restaurant, hotel, sports arena, or travel agency. You might manage operations of a college cafeteria. Or you might guide high school students on a trip to Spain. Or you might rent equipment at a recreation center. National Employment Outlook There will be employment opportunities in hospitality and tourism in the future. Participation in amusement and recreation activities will increase for a number of reasons. First, incomes are increasing and more people are spending more money in this area. Many people have more leisure time. Also, more people are aware of the benefits of physical fitness. Businesses in hospitality and tourism are targeting the elderly, the fastest growing part of the population. part of the population. p Pathways MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Restaurant and Food and Beverage Services In the Restaurant and Food and Beverage Services cluster, you would make sure that customers received the food and drinks they ordered. You might prepare the food at a large restaurant or a fast-food business. You could take orders and deliver the food. Or you could clean up after the customer leaves. Lodging Employees in the Lodging pathway take care of guests who stay at hotels or motels. You might work directly with guests. Or you might provide the services that make their stay at the hotel pleasant. Travel and Tourism Employees in the Travel and Tourism pathway make sure travelers have a good experience on trips. You might help a traveler plan and arrange a trip. You might write guidebooks. Or you might plan and present educational information about a specific location or area. Recreation, Amusements, and Attractions In the Recreation, Amusements, and Attractions pathway, you might find exciting and diverse work situations. The work is often demanding but usually not boring. You will need good customer service skills. Each of the business operations in this area is unique and has different requirements for employees. 36 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $27,755 Recreation workers SR Conduct recreation activities with groups in public, private, or volunteer agencies or recreation facilities. Organize and promote activities, such as arts and crafts, sports, games, music, dramatics, social recreation, camping, and hobbies. Median: $20,186 Low-end: $16,750 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 46 Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $38,785 Chefs and head cooks ESR Direct the preparation, seasoning, and cooking of salads, soups, fish, meats, vegetables, desserts, or other foods. May plan and price menu items, order supplies, and keep records and accounts. May participate in cooking. Median: $32,954 Low-end: $26,880 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 First-line supervisors/ managers of food prep. and serving workers First-line supervisors/managers of housekeeping and janitorial workers First-line supervisors/managers of landscaping, lawn service, and groundskeeping workers High-end: $34,933 Median: $28,252 SEC Supervise workers engaged in preparing and serving food. Low-end: $22,499 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 63 High-end: $39,437 Median: $31,421 RC Supervise work activities of cleaning personnel in hotels, hospitals, offices, and other establishments. Low-end: $25,028 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 33 High-end: $43,357 ESR Plan, organize, direct, or coordinate activities of workers engaged in landscaping or groundskeeping activities, such as planting and maintaining ornamental trees, shrubs, flowers, and lawns, and applying fertilizers, pesticides, and other chemicals. Median: $35,961 Low-end: $30,829 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 21 High-end: $48,909 Median: $34,579 Food service managers ECS Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages. Low-end: $26,880 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 Gaming Supervisors CSE Supervise gaming operations and personnel in an assigned area. Circulate among tables and observe operations. Ensure that stations and games are covered for each shift. May explain and interpret operating rules of house to patrons. May plan and organize activities and create friendly atmosphere for guests in hotels/casinos. May adjust service complaints. High-end: $26,259 Median: $23,833 Low-end: $21,404 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 31 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $42,125 Lodging managers ECS Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that provides lodging and other accommodations. Median: $33,500 Low-end: $25,073 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 38 Long-Term On-The-Job Training High-end: $22,255 Cooks, restaurant RC Prepare, season, and cook soups, meats, vegetables, desserts, or other foodstuffs in restaurants. May order supplies, keep records and accounts, price items on menu, or plan menu. Median: $18,609 Low-end: $16,111 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 184 37 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-The-Job Training Coin, vending, and amusement machine servicers and repairers Cooks, institution and cafeteria High-end: $33,826 RC Install, service, adjust, or repair coin, vending, or amusement machines including video games, juke boxes, pinball machines, or slot machines. Median: $28,492 Low-end: $22,272 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 7 High-end: $23,764 ERC Prepare and cook large quantities of food for institutions, such as schools, hospitals, or cafeterias. Median: $19,813 Low-end: $17,158 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 113 High-end: $24,485 Laundry and dry-cleaning workers RIC Operate or tend washing or dry-cleaning machines to wash or dry-clean industrial or household articles, such as cloth garments, suede, leather, furs, blankets, draperies, fine linens, rugs, and carpets. Median: $19,143 Low-end: $16,301 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 32 High-end: $24,391 Tour guides and escorts RCE Escort individuals or groups on sightseeing tours or through places of interest, such as industrial establishments, public buildings, and art galleries. Median: $16,961 Low-end: $15,108 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 58 Short-Term On-The-Job Training Amusement and recreation attendants Perform variety of attending duties at amusement or recreation facility. May schedule use of recreation facilities, maintain and provide equipment to participants of sporting events or recreational pursuits, or operate amusement concessions and rides. ECS Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: High-end: $19,583 Median: $16,875 67 Bartenders RC Mix and serve drinks to patrons, directly or through waitstaff. Low-end: $14,960 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 316 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Combined food prep. and serving workers, including fast food High-end: $18,933 Median: $15,938 R Perform duties which combine both food preparation and food service. Low-end: $14,532 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 376 High-end: $19,059 Cooks, fast food ER Prepare and cook food in a fast food restaurant with a limited menu. Duties of the cooks are limited to preparation of a few basic items and normally involve operating large-volume singlepurpose cooking equipment. Median: $16,248 Low-end: $14,688 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 92 High-end: $28,383 Cooks, short order RCS Prepare and cook to order a variety of foods that require only a short preparation time. May take orders from customers and serve patrons at counters or tables. Median: $19,750 Low-end: $15,910 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 38 Counter attendants, cafeteria, food concession, and coffee shop High-end: $17,923 Median: $15,425 ESR Serve food to diners at counter or from a steam table. Low-end: $14,273 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 117 38 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Short-Term On-The-Job Training Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers High-end: $17,219 SE Facilitate food service. Clean tables, carry dirty dishes, replace soiled table linens; set tables; replenish supply of clean linens, silverware, glassware, and dishes; supply service bar with food, and serve water, butter, and coffee to patrons. Median: $15,457 Low-end: $14,310 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 60 High-end: $18,344 Median: $16,067 Dishwashers SRE Clean dishes, kitchen, food preparation equipment, or utensils. Low-end: $14,597 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 124 High-end: $19,960 Food preparation workers REA Perform a variety of food preparation duties other than cooking, such as preparing cold foods and shellfish, slicing meat, and brewing coffee or tea. Median: $16,044 Low-end: $14,444 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 129 High-end: $20,319 Food servers, nonrestaurant RSE Serve food to patrons outside of a restaurant environment, such as in hotels, hospital rooms, or cars. Median: $17,304 Low-end: $15,160 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 20 Hosts and hostesses, restaurant, lounge, and coffee shop Hotel, motel, and resort desk clerks Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners Landscaping and groundskeeping workers High-end: $16,472 RSE Welcome patrons, seat them at tables or in lounge, and help ensure quality of facilities and service. Median: $15,270 Low-end: $14,220 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 88 High-end: $19,508 CES Accommodate hotel, motel, and resort patrons by registering and assigning rooms to guests, issuing room keys, transmitting and receiving messages, keeping records of occupied rooms and guests' accounts, and making and confirming reservations. Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities. Landscape or maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment. Workers typically perform a variety of tasks, which may include any combination of the following: sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, or raking Perform any combination of light cleaning duties to maintain private households or commercial establishments, such as hotels, restaurants, and hospitals, in a clean and orderly manner. Duties include making beds, replenishing linens, and cleaning rooms. Feed, water, groom, bathe, exercise, or otherwise care for pets and other nonfarm animals, such as dogs, cats, ornamental fish or birds, zoo animals, and mice. Work in settings such as kennels, animal shelters, zoos, circuses, and aquariums. Median: $16,712 Low-end: $14,868 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 140 High-end: $25,558 Median: $20,935 ERC Low-end: $16,552 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 386 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $28,301 Median: $23,152 R Low-end: $18,746 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 182 High-end: $19,721 Maids and housekeeping cleaners Median: $17,120 ERC Low-end: $15,205 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 268 High-end: $20,304 Nonfarm animal caretakers Median: $17,674 EC Low-end: $15,358 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 24 39 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Short-Term On-The-Job Training (cont.) Reservation and transportation ticket agents and travel clerks High-end: $25,406 CES Make and confirm reservations and sell tickets to passengers and for large hotel or motel chains. May check baggage and direct passengers to designated concourse, pier, or track; make reservations, deliver tickets, and arrange for visas. Median: $21,487 Low-end: $18,416 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 High-end: $16,594 Median: $15,262 Waiters and waitresses R Take orders and serve food and beverages to patrons at tables in dining establishment. Low-end: $14,215 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 696 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OCCUPATIONS Do you enjoy working with computers? Have you created your own webpage? Is mathematics a favorite subject? Are you organized and detail-oriented? Do you learn new computer programs quickly? Information Technology (IT) is an area that is growing and always changing with new developments. In IT, you would be part of a cluster that continues to make an impact on society and individuals. You would have the opportunity to work in all types and sizes of businesses from Microsoft to your local hospital. Employees in Information Technology work with computer hardware, software, multimedia, and network systems. In this cluster, you might design new computer equipment or computer games. Or you might make sure that the software or networks are working. In addition, you might have to make sure that people know how to use them. Or you might manage whole networks that link workers in all parts of the world. National Employment Outlook There will be many opportunities for employment in the Information Technology cluster in the future. Employees in this cluster will be expected to have a high level of skills and to keep up with changes in technology. More companies are relying on information technology. Computers and related hardware are getting cheaper and faster and more advanced. Electronic commerce is becoming more common. All this increases the need for employees wi expertise in information technology. employees with expertise in information technology. py with MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Pathways Network Systems The work done by the employees in the Network k Systems pathway is critical to the success of almost t every company. You would be involved in designing, , installing, and maintaining network systems. These e systems allow workers to share information and projects. For example, in a medical facility, a network syss tem would allow several doctors to view a patient’s X-rays at the same time. They then could work together to determine the problem and best treatment. Information Support and Services In the Information Support and Services pathway, you would set up computers, install the software, and make sure that everything is working. If there is a problem, you would find the best solution and test it. You may also be expected to teach other employees how to use the software. In some businesses, you may have to make adaptations in the software to meet specific company needs. Or you may integrate software programs or databases. 40 Programming and Software Development In the Programming and Software Development pathway, you would design and test new software programs. You would be developing tomorrow’s products for businesses and individuals. You could be employed by large software companies or small businesses that design programs for special groups such as medical offices. To work in this area, you have to know about operating systems and programming languages. Wages Outlook Occupation Interest Profile Description Master’s Degree High-end: $51,919 Librarians ACI Administer libraries and perform related library services. Work in a variety of settings, including public libraries, schools, colleges and universities, museums, corporations, government agencies, law firms, non-profit organizations, and healthcare providers. Median: $39,126 Low-end: $28,954 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 22 High-end: $15,800 Survey researchers Design or conduct surveys. May supervise interviewers who conduct the survey in person or over the telephone. May present survey results to client. Median: $14,790 Low-end: $13,790 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 6 Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $106,163 Computer and information systems managers ECI Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming. Median: $82,825 Low-end: $68,137 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 9 Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $64,085 Computer programmers IRC Convert project specifications and statements of problems and procedures to detailed logical flow charts for coding into computer language. Develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data, and information. Develop, create, and modify general computer applications software or specialized utility programs. Analyze user needs and develop software solutions. Design software or customize software for client use with the aim of optimizing operational efficiency. Analyze science, engineering, business, and all other data processing problems for application to electronic data processing systems. Analyze user requirements, procedures, and problems to automate or improve existing systems and review computer system capabilities. Install, configure, and support an organization's local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), and Internet system or a segment of a network system. Maintain network hardware and software. Monitor network to ensure network availability to all system users. Median: $47,362 Low-end: $35,998 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 35 High-end: $77,359 Median: $62,036 Computer software engineers, applications IRC Low-end: $50,221 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 40 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $71,480 Median: $57,802 Computer systems analysts IRE Low-end: $45,407 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 44 High-end: $62,064 Median: $49,261 Network and computer systems administrators IRC Low-end: $39,117 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 34 41 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree Network systems and data communications analysts High-end: $63,230 IR Analyze, design, test, and evaluate network systems, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), Internet, intranet, and other data communications systems. Perform network modeling, analysis, and planning. Median: $51,198 Low-end: $39,031 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 26 Associate Degree Computer support specialists Provide technical assistance to computer system users. Answer questions or resolve computer problems for clients in person, via telephone or from remote location. May provide assistance concerning the use of computer hardware and software, including print High-end: $44,722 Median: $36,081 ICR Low-end: $28,531 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 55 Postsecondary Vocational Training Computer, automated teller, and office machine repairers High-end: $41,594 RCE Repair, maintain, or install computers, word processing systems, automated teller machines, and electronic office machines, such as duplicating and fax machines. Median: $32,567 Low-end: $26,824 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 6 Long-Term On-the-Job Training Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers, except line installers Telecommunications line installers and repairers Set-up, rearrange, or remove switching and dialing equipment used in central offices. Service or repair telephones and other communication equipment on customers' property. May install equipment in new locations or install wiring and telephone jacks in bu String and repair telephone and television cable, including fiber optics and other equipment for transmitting messages or television programming. High-end: $60,864 Median: $55,155 RCE Low-end: $37,019 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 15 High-end: $57,530 Median: $46,711 R Low-end: $33,068 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training Monitor and control electronic computer and peripheral electronic data processing equipment to process business, scientific, engineering, and other data according to operating instructions. May enter commands at a computer terminal and set controls on com Operate data entry device, such as keyboard or photo composing perforator. Duties may include verifying data and preparing materials for printing. High-end: $35,302 Median: $28,020 Computer operators CE Low-end: $21,949 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 4 High-end: $25,502 Data entry keyers Median: $21,452 CES Low-end: $18,363 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 21 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $26,717 Library technicians CS Assist librarians by helping readers in the use of library catalogs, databases, and indexes to locate books and other materials; and by answering questions that require only brief consultation of standard reference. Compile records; sort and shelve books; Median: $21,920 Low-end: $18,275 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 22 42 MARKETING, SALES, AND SERVICE OCCUPATIONS Do you sell advertising space for the school yearbook or newspaper? Are you good at persuading people to do things? Do you like to do public speaking or debating? Are you good at organizing your own time? Are you friendly and outgoing? If you are interested in working in the Marketing, Sales, and Service cluster, you would help businesses sell products. You might advertise and promote products so customers would want to buy them. Or you might sell products and services directly to customers. Or you might use the Internet to reach customers. National Employment Outlook In the future, there will be many job opportunities in the Marketing, Sales, and Service cluster. The number of people employed in sales and marketing is very large. Numerous job openings will result from turnover. Many people leave for higher paying jobs or for the opportunity to work regular hours. E-commerce has affected the number of sales persons who are needed because companies and individuals place orders directly. The glamour of advertising attracts many jobseekers. As a result there are many more jobseekers than there are job openings. New jobs will be created because of an increased demand for advertising services. However, the increased use of technology could replace some workers. Pathways Management and Entrepreneurship In the Management and Entrepreneurship pathway, employees direct the marketing operations. The responsibilities include advertising, marketing, sales, and public relations. You might work in a large corporation and direct the activities of several employees. Or you might work for a small company and do all the activities yourself. Professional Sales and Marketing Employees in the Professional Sales and Marketing pathway make sure that goods and services are sold to consumers. The consumers may be other businesses or individuals. Buying and Merchandising Employees in the Buying and Merchandising pathway get the product into the hands of the customer. You might buy the products that the businesses sell. Or you may design the display and packaging for the product. Or you might assist the customers with making decisions about which products best meets their needs. Marketing Communications and Promotion Marketing Communications and Promotion employees design and implement marketing plans. You might create ads for television or magazines. Or you might develop spot ads for radio so an organization becomes better known by the public. Marketing Information Management and Research Employees in Marketing Information Management and Research collect and analyze many different types of information. The information is used to design new products and to predict future sales. Or you might get information to compare your company against a competitor. Distribution and Logistics Employees in the Distribution and Logistics pathway arrange delivery of products to stores for sales and also to customers. You would make sure that there are enough products to be sold and that the products are on the shelves. You would also make sure the correct products or services are delivered to the customers. E-Marketing Employees in the E-marketing pathway use the Internet to sell products and services. You might create the content for the website. You might provide the services by taking the orders and arranging for delivery. Or you might do market research using the latest electronic tools. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 43 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Master’s Degree Market research analysts Research market conditions in local, regional, or national areas to determine potential sales of a product or service. May gather information on competitors, prices, sales, and methods of marketing and distribution. May use survey results to create a marketing plan. High-end: $56,695 Median: $39,463 IEC Low-end: $29,812 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 12 Bachelor’s Degree Property, real estate, and community association managers High-end: $29,011 EC Plan, direct, or coordinate selling, buying, leasing, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties. Median: $22,506 Low-end: $18,179 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 52 Postsecondary Vocational Training High-end: $49,656 Appraisers and assessors of real estate CE Appraise real property to determine its fair value. May assess taxes in accordance with prescribed schedules. Median: $35,257 Low-end: $24,512 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 High-end: $55,569 Real estate sales agents ERS Rent, buy, or sell property for clients. Perform duties, such as study property listings, interview prospective clients, accompany clients to property site, discuss conditions of sale, and draw up real estate contracts. Median: $38,263 Low-end: $30,398 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 45 Work Experience in a Related Field High-end: $65,563 First-line supervisors/managers of non-retail sales workers First-line supervisors/ managers of retail sales workers RAC Directly supervise and coordinate activities of sales workers other than retail sales workers. May perform duties, such as budgeting, accounting, and personnel work, in addition to supervisory duties. Median: $53,411 Low-end: $42,888 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 61 High-end: $38,832 SRE Directly supervise sales workers in a retail establishment or department. Duties may include management functions, such as purchasing, budgeting, accounting, and personnel work, in addition to supervisory duties. Median: $29,564 Low-end: $23,389 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 201 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Purchasing agents, except wholesale, retail, and farm products High-end: $57,542 EC Purchase machinery, equipment, tools, parts, supplies, or services necessary for the operation of an establishment. Purchase raw or semi-finished materials for manufacturing. Median: $42,763 Low-end: $32,831 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 High-end: $68,899 Real estate brokers ES Operate real estate office, or work for commercial real estate firm, overseeing real estate transactions. Other duties usually include selling real estate or renting properties and arranging loans. Median: $60,359 Low-end: $53,896 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 10 High-end: $53,217 Wholesale and retail buyers, except farm products ECS Buy merchandise or commodities, other than farm products, for resale to consumers at the wholesale or retail level, including both durable and nondurable goods. Analyze past buying trends, sales records, price, and quality of merchandise to determine value. Median: $37,805 Low-end: $28,310 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 30 44 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $39,099 Advertising sales agents ERC Sell or solicit advertising, including graphic art, advertising space in publications, custom made signs, or TV and radio advertising time. May obtain leases for outdoor advertising sites or persuade retailer to use sales promotion display items. Median: $28,337 Low-end: $20,234 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 28 High-end: $36,663 Customer service representatives CE Interact with customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services and to handle and resolve complaints. Median: $27,128 Low-end: $21,106 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 250 High-end: $22,176 Demonstrators and product promoters ERS Demonstrate merchandise and answer questions for the purpose of creating public interest in buying the product. May sell demonstrated merchandise. Median: $18,796 Low-end: $17,273 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 23 High-end: $23,493 Median: $19,620 Floral designers ARE Design, cut, and arrange live, dried, or artificial flowers and foliage. Low-end: $16,684 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 High-end: $25,587 Merchandise displayers and window trimmers ARE Plan and erect commercial displays, such as those in windows and interiors of retail stores and at trade exhibitions. Median: $19,539 Low-end: $17,684 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 10 High-end: $36,704 Parts salespersons CER Sell spare and replacement parts and equipment in repair shop or parts store. Median: $29,906 Low-end: $24,003 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 15 Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, except technical and scientific products Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, technical and scientific products High-end: $51,408 ECS Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses or groups of individuals. Work requires substantial knowledge of items sold. Median: $38,152 Low-end: $28,615 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 162 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $58,938 ESC Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers where technical or scientific knowledge is required in such areas as biology, engineering, chemistry, and electronics, normally obtained from at least 2 years of post-secondary education. Median: $45,445 Low-end: $33,098 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 37 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $20,039 Cashiers ECS Receive and disburse money in establishments other than financial institutions. Usually involves use of electronic scanners, cash registers, or related equipment. Often involved in processing credit or debit card transactions and validating checks. Median: $17,258 Low-end: $15,097 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 713 High-end: $24,979 Counter and rental clerks ECS Receive orders for repairs, rentals, and services. May describe available options, compute cost, and accept payment. Median: $19,273 Low-end: $15,380 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 123 45 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Short-Term On-the-Job Training Door-to-door sales workers, news and street vendors, and related workers High-end: $36,968 Median: $25,225 ESC Sell goods or services door-to-door or on the street. Low-end: $19,567 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 20 High-end: $31,977 Driver/sales workers RSC Drive truck or other vehicle over established routes or within an established territory and sell goods, such as food products, including restaurant take-out items, or pick up and deliver items, such as laundry. May also take orders and collect payments. Receive and process incoming orders for materials, merchandise, classified ads, or services such as repairs, installations, or rental of facilities. Duties include informing customers of receipt, prices, shipping dates, and delays; and preparing contracts. Median: $24,379 Low-end: $18,368 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 28 High-end: $32,398 Median: $24,779 Order clerks CSE Low-end: $20,564 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 High-end: $27,376 Retail salespersons CER Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment. Median: $19,974 Low-end: $16,331 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 1106 High-end: $27,376 Service Station Attendants RE Service automobiles, buses, trucks, boats, and other automotive or marine vehicles with fuel, lubricants, and accessories. Collect payment for services and supplies. May lubricate vehicle, change motor oil, install antifreeze, or replace light. Receive, store, and issue sales floor merchandise, materials, equipment, and other items from stockroom, warehouse, or storage yard to fill shelves, racks, tables, or customers' orders. May mark prices on merchandise and set up sales displays. Median: $19,974 Low-end: $16,331 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 39 High-end: $25,109 Stock clerks and order fillers Median: $20,514 CE Low-end: $17,315 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 131 High-end: $27,262 Median: $18,567 Telemarketers ERS Solicit orders for goods or services over the telephone. Low-end: $15,117 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 37 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 46 AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES OCCUPATIONS Do you collect rocks? Do you have a green thumb? Do you enjoy working with animals? Are you interested in protecting the environment? Do you enjoy working outdoors? Are science classes your favorite? If you chose to work in occupations in the Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources cluster, you could raise plants and animals as sources for food and shelter. On the other hand, you could focus on selling and making products from plants and animals. These products include food, lumber, and fabrics. You might also provide advice and services that farmers and ranchers need to improve products. Another option in this cluster is to work to conserve natural resources and protect the environment. National Employment Outlook The prospects in farm production will be limited. There will be a 14 percent decline in the number of selfemployed farm and ranch operators in the next ten years. You will find more jobs in agricultural services. Job openings will arise from the need to replace workers who leave every year. Turnover is very high among animal caretakers and farm and ranch workers. The turnover is the result of the seasonal and part-time nature of the work. Other factors are the low pay and high physical demands. Employment will increase in landscaping and horticultural services. This will be a result of new construction. In addition, individuals and businesses recognize the value of preserving and restoring existing landscape and grounds. A growing number of homeowners use lawn maintenance and landscaping services to enhance the beauty of their property and to conserve leisure time. Veterinary services will continue to experience growth because of increases in the number of pet owners. Pet owners are expected to take advantage of grooming services and boarding services. Employment growth in farm-related agricultural services--crop services, soil preparation services, farm labor and management services, and livestock services--are linked to the health of agricultural production. When farmers and ranchers face difficult times, the demand for agricultural services also drops. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 47 Pathways Agribusiness In the Agribusiness pathway, you would focus on products or services. You would actually grow food, fiber, or wood products. Or, you would assist farmers and ranchers by providing important services. This assistance might include granting the loans they need to operate. Other forms of assistance might include selling them the tools, equipment, or supplies they need to operate their farms or ranches. You might also assist them with doing their work or by selling their products to get the best prices. Animals In the Animals pathway, you would strive to find better ways to produce and process meat, eggs, and dairy products. You might study the genetics, nutrition, or development of animals. On the other hand, you might purchase livestock from farmers and ranchers or assist them with marketing or selling their animals. To assure that the products are safe to eat, you could inspect and grade meat. To assist farmers and ranchers, you could advise them on how to feed or house their animals to increase production. Another option is to care for the animals. You might train, feed and water, groom, or exercise the animals. You may also clean, disinfect, and repair their cages, stalls, or barns. Environmental Service In the Environmental Service pathway, you would act to protect the environment. You might focus on pollution control, recycling, waste disposal, or public health issues. Your work could involve doing studies to find threats to the ecosystem. Then you would figure out how to deal with the threats and to prevent future problems. You might design and operate wastewater systems. In other occupations in this pathway, you could collect, recycle, and remove hazardous materials. Food Products and Processing If you were to study and work in the Food Products and Processing pathway, you would have several options. You might discover new food sources. You could also analyze food content and create new food products. Or, you could inspect processing areas to make sure food is safe to eat. Natural Resources In the Natural Resources pathway, you could perform a variety of tasks. Forests and rangelands supply wood products, livestock forage, minerals, and water. They also serve as sites for recreational activities and provide homes for wildlife. You would manage, develop, and help protect the forests and rangelands and other resources. Plants In the occupations in the Plants pathway, you would study vegetation. Your goal would be to help crop producers feed a growing population. At the same time, you would help them conserve natural resources and protect the environment. You might also develop ways to improve the food value of crops and the quality of seeds. Through research, you could develop plants that require fewer fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides or that are resistant to drought. Power, Structural, and Technical Systems In the Power, Structural, and Technical Systems pathway, you use engineering, mechanics, electronics, and power to improve agriculture. You might design buildings and equipment used on farms and ranches. You might also develop ways to conserve soil and water. Or your goal might be to improve how farm products are processed. Another option for you is to maintain and repair the machines and structures. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 48 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook First Professional Degree Diagnose and treat diseases and dysfunctions of animals. May engage in a particular function, such as research and development, consultation, administration, technical writing, sale or production of commercial products, or rendering of technical services. High-end: $71,600 Median: $54,584 Veterinarians IRS Low-end: $37,171 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 24 Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field Farm, ranch, and other agricultural managers On a paid basis, manage farms, ranches, aquacultural operations, greenhouses, nurseries, timber tracts, cotton gins, packing houses, or other agricultural establishments for employers. Carry out production, financial, and marketing decisions. IA Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: 13 Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $60,793 Foresters RIC Manage forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. Median: $49,716 Low-end: $41,461 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 Associate Degree Forest and conservation technicians Compile data pertaining to size, content, condition, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under direction of foresters; train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression. May assist conservation scientists. RIC Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: 64 Postsecondary Vocational Training High-end: $37,493 Farm equipment mechanics RC Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul farm machinery and vehicles, such as tractors, harvesters, dairy equipment, and irrigation systems. Median: $30,313 Low-end: $25,107 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 13 Long-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $26,069 Median: $21,442 Bakers RC Mix and bake ingredients according to recipes to produce breads, rolls, cookies, cakes, pies, pastries, or other baked goods. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Low-end: $17,027 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 30 High-end: $31,178 Median: $27,219 Butchers and meat cutters ERC Cut, trim, or prepare consumer-sized portions of meat for use or sale in retail establishments. Low-end: $21,157 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 27 Farmers and Ranchers IA Operate farms, ranches, greenhouses, nurseries, timber tracts, or other agricultural production establishments. May plant, cultivate, harvest, perform post-harvest activities, and market crops and livestock; may hire, train, and supervise farm workers or supervise a farm labor contractor; may prepare cost, production, and other records. May maintain and operate machinery and perform physical work. Control the operation of petroleum refining or processing units. May specialize in controlling manifold and pumping systems, gauging or testing oil in storage tanks, or regulating the flow of oil into pipelines. Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: High-end: $64,052 Median: $59,822 494 Petroleum pump system operators, refinery operators, and gaugers RC Low-end: $55,593 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 49 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Long-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $38,997 Water and liquid waste treatment plant and system operators RA Operate or control an entire process or system of machines, often through the use of control boards, to transfer or treat water or liquid waste. Median: $30,385 Low-end: $22,130 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training Agricultural equipment operators Drive and control farm equipment to till soil and to plant, cultivate, and harvest crops. May perform tasks, such as crop baling or hay bucking. May operate stationary equipment to perform post-harvest tasks, such as husking, shelling, threshing, and ginning. Operate a variety of drills--such as rotary, churn, and pneumatic-to tap sub-surface water and salt deposits, to remove core samples during mineral exploration or soil testing, and to facilitate the use of explosives in mining or construction. May use ex High-end: $36,601 Median: $29,399 CR Low-end: $24,828 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 High-end: $51,952 Earth drillers, except oil and gas Excavating and Loading Machine and Dragline Operators Logging equipment operators Median: $43,370 RC Low-end: $33,355 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 31 High-end: $49,038 RC Operate or tend machinery equipped with scoops, shovels, or buckets, to excavate and load loose materials. Median: $39,904 Low-end: $28,173 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 High-end: $41,717 RIC Drive logging tractor or wheeled vehicle equipped with one or more accessories, such as bulldozer blade, frontal shear, grapple, logging arch, cable winches, hoisting rack, or crane boom, to fell tree; to skid, load, unload, or stack logs; or to pull stumps. Median: $36,947 Low-end: $32,066 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 High-end: $45,428 Median: $34,272 Roustabouts, oil and gas R Assemble or repair oil field equipment using hand and power tools. Perform other tasks as needed. Low-end: $29,720 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 24 High-end: $35,771 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Sawing machine setters, operators, and tenders, wood RC Set up, operate, or tend wood sawing machines. Includes head sawyers. Median: $29,768 Low-end: $22,964 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 14 Short-Term On-the-Job Training Farmworkers and laborers, crop, nursery, and greenhouse Farmworkers, farm and ranch animals High-end: $25,376 CRE Manually plant, cultivate, and harvest vegetables, fruits, nuts, horticultural specialties, and field crops. Use hand tools, such as shovels, trowels, hoes, tampers, pruning hooks, shears, and knives. Duties may include tilling soil and applying fertilize Attend to live farm, ranch, or aquacultural animals that may include cattle, sheep, swine, goats, horses and other equines, poultry, finfish, shellfish, and bees. Attend to animals produced for animal products. Median: $20,734 Low-end: $17,171 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 69 High-end: $31,647 Median: $26,723 R Low-end: $18,864 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 51 50 HEALTH SCIENCE OCCUPATIONS Are science classes your favorite? Do you enjoy helping people? Have you served as a volunteer in a hospital? Do you follow instructions exactly? Can you work fast in an emergency? Do you take good notes in class? In the Health Science cluster you would promote health and wellness or diagnose and treat injuries and disease. You could work directly with people. Or you could work in laboratories to get information used in research or diagnosis. Health service employees go to work at a variety of different sites. Some work in hospitals, offices, or laboratories. Others work on cruise ships, at sports arenas, or within communities. National Employment Outlook The outlook for employment in the Health Services cluster is very good. The number of elderly people is growing and they have greater healthcare needs. Advances in medical technology have increased the number of people who survive serious illnesses and injuries. These patients need more intensive therapy and care. The jobs in hospitals will grow the slowest. This is the result of an increase in outpatient care and services. Pathways Therapeutic Services In the Therapeutic Services pathway, you work directly with patients to improve their health. The contact with the patient may be limited to a visit or to o contact over many months. You may provide direct t care and treatment for patients. You may also give e information and counseling so patients can care for r themselves. Diagnostics Services In the Diagnostics Services pathway, you would cont duct tests and do evaluations. The goal is to assist with detecting and identifying diseases and injuries. Once the diagnosis is made, the test results would be used to set up a treatment plan. Health Information You would be responsible for compiling patient information and records in the Health Information pathway. You might also use the records to create bills for services. Included in this pathway are administrators who plan and direct the delivery of health care. You may manage hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, or departments. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 51 Support Services Employees in the Support Services pathway provide assistance so that therapeutic services workers can do their job. You might make sure that medical machines operate. Or you might make sure that medical offices operate smoothly. Or you might be sure that patients and employees get meals that are healthy and meet diet guidelines. Occupation Interest Profile Description Biotechnology Research and Development In the Biotechnology Research and Development pathway, you would be a scientist who works in a laboratory. Through your research, you would try to discover new treatments for diseases or injuries. Or you may work to invent medical devices to help patients live fuller lives. The inventions you work on may also lead to more accurate test results. Wages Outlook First Professional Degree High-end: $162,559 Family and general practitioners IRC Diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population. Median: $139,470 Low-end: $110,346 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 13 High-end: $103,945 Pharmacists ARE Compound and dispense medications following prescriptions issued by physicians, dentists, or other authorized medical practitioners. Median: $94,320 Low-end: $83,664 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 52 Master’s Degree High-end: $66,268 Physical therapists I Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that improve mobility, relieve pain, increase strength, and decrease or prevent deformity of patients suffering from disease or injury. Median: $58,051 Low-end: $45,758 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 28 Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $59,031 Medical and clinical laboratory technologists SI Perform complex medical laboratory tests for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. May train or supervise staff. Median: $49,332 Low-end: $41,425 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 16 Associate Degree MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $75,542 Dental hygienists IR Clean teeth and examine oral areas, head, and neck for signs of oral disease. May educate patients on oral hygiene, take and develop X-rays, or apply fluoride or sealants. Compile, process, and maintain medical records of hospital and clinic patients in a manner consistent with medical, administrative, ethical, legal, and regulatory requirements of the health care system. Process, maintain, compile, and report patient information. Take X-rays and CAT scans or administer nonradioactive materials into patient's blood stream for diagnostic purposes. Includes technologists who specialize in other modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance. Median: $66,581 Low-end: $59,106 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 27 Medical records and health information technicians Radiologic technologists and technicians High-end: $35,823 Median: $29,145 CR Low-end: $23,353 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 35 High-end: $58,717 Median: $48,227 IR Low-end: $39,842 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 23 52 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Associate Degree Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention, Assess, treat, and care for patients with breathing disorders. Assume primary responsibility for all respiratory care modalities, including the supervision of respiratory therapy technicians. Initiate and conduct therapeutic procedures. High-end: $63,238 Median: $54,308 Registered nurses IRE Low-end: $46,182 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 317 High-end: $51,431 Respiratory therapists Median: $46,219 SI Low-end: $40,438 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 12 Postsecondary Vocational Training Emergency medical technicians and paramedics Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses High-end: $30,510 SC Assess injuries, administer emergency medical care, and extricate trapped individuals. Transport injured or sick persons to medical facilities. Median: $23,681 Low-end: $19,824 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 19 High-end: $38,482 SRI Care for ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled persons in hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, private homes, group homes, and similar institutions. May work under the supervision of a registered nurse. Licensing required. Perform secretarial duties utilizing specific knowledge of medical terminology and hospital, clinic, or laboratory procedures. Duties include scheduling appointments, billing patients, and compiling and recording medical charts, reports, and correspondence. Use transcribing machines with headset and foot pedal to listen to recordings by physicians and other healthcare professionals dictating a variety of medical reports, such as emergency room visits, diagnostic imaging studies, operations, and chart reviews. Median: $33,530 Low-end: $29,232 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 113 High-end: $31,911 Medical secretaries Median: $27,807 CES Low-end: $23,181 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 51 High-end: $33,525 Medical transcriptionists Median: $29,799 SR Low-end: $26,155 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 Long-Term On-the-Job Training Design, measure, fit, and adapt lenses and frames for client according to written optical prescription or specification. Assist client with selecting frames. Measure customer for size of eyeglasses and coordinate frames with facial and eye measurements. High-end: $30,028 Median: $25,342 Opticians, dispensing SRI MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Low-end: $20,391 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 22 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $34,599 Median: $30,029 Dental assistants SR Assist dentist, set up patient and equipment, and keep records. Low-end: $26,323 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 35 High-end: $30,588 Medical assistants Perform administrative and certain clinical duties under the direction of physician. Administrative duties may include scheduling appointments, maintaining medical records, billing, and coding for insurance purposes. Median: $26,686 Low-end: $22,295 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 32 53 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $30,588 Pharmacy technicians RI Prepare medications under the direction of a pharmacist. May measure, mix, count out, label, and record amounts and dosages of medications. Median: $26,686 Low-end: $22,295 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 62 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $32,219 Home health aides CR Provide routine, personal healthcare, such as bathing, dressing, or grooming, to elderly, convalescent, or disabled persons in the home of patients or in a residential care facility. Median: $28,149 Low-end: $24,289 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 106 High-end: $23,238 Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants ECR Provide basic patient care under direction of nursing staff. Perform duties, such as feed, bathe, dress, groom, or move patients, or change linens. Median: $20,657 Low-end: $18,006 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 157 High-end: $24,574 Psychiatric aides SR Assist mentally impaired or emotionally disturbed patients, working under direction of nursing and medical staff. Median: $21,743 Low-end: $19,024 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 4 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 54 THIS CLUSTER INCLUDES: Education & Training Occupations Government & Public Administration Occupations Human Services Occupations Law, Public Safety, & Security Occupations EDUCATION AND TRAINING OCCUPATIONS Are you patient? Have you coached sports activities? Do you like to speak in front of groups? Do you enjoy teaching games to children? Are you outgoing? Do you like being in school? In the Education and Training cluster, you would have the opportunity to guide and train young people. As a teacher, you could influence young lives. In addition, you could support the work of the classroom teacher as a counselor, librarian, or principal. If you are interested in working with adults, you could provide training to employees in a business. Each of these settings provides you with the chance to help people learn and improve their lives. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 National Employment Outlook Most of the openings in education will result from workers and educators retiring. In the future there may not be enough teachers graduating from college to fill the job openings. Positions in math, science, bilingual, and special education will continue to be difficult to fill. However, many state governments and local school districts are facing budget problems. As a result, schools are cutting support services and some educational programs. If these financial problems continue, more schools will combine and more programs will be cut. As a result employment may grow more slowly. 55 Pathways Teaching and Training As an educator in the Teaching and Training pathway, you would teach others about a subject you love. You could inspire young learners. This would require you to have the ability to communicate with and motivate learners. To do this, you would have to understand their diverse needs and individual differences. To help each learner achieve, you would use a variety of teaching methods and tools. Professional Support Services The Professional Support Services pathway includes occupations that are important for the success of schools and learners. You would assist learners with Occupation Interest Profile Description physical, personal, and family needs. These needs might be barriers to success in school. Or you might guide learners as they develop educational and career goals. Administration and Administrative Support For a school to operate smoothly, someone must be in charge. In the Administration and Administrative Support pathway, you would manage all the activities in a school. You might also run preschools, daycare centers, colleges, and universities. On the other hand, you might support the work of teachers and administrators. Wages Outlook Doctoral Degree High-end: $62,047 Education teachers, postsecondary Teach courses pertaining to education, such as counseling, curriculum, guidance, instruction, teacher education, and teaching English as a second language. Median: $48,287 Low-end: $36,377 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 14 Master’s Degree High-end: $53,204 Educational, vocational, and school counselors SAC Counsel individuals and provide group educational and vocational guidance services. Median: $37,831 Low-end: $26,677 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 35 High-end: $64,462 Speechlanguage pathologists SRI Assess and treat persons with speech, language, voice, and fluency disorders. May select alternative communication systems and teach their use. May perform research related to speech and language problems. Median: $56,097 Low-end: $39,646 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience in a Related Field Education administrators, elementary and secondary school Education administrators, postsecondary High-end: $79,171 CEI Plan, direct, or coordinate the academic, clerical, or auxiliary activities of public or private elementary or secondary level schools. Median: $68,005 Low-end: $56,877 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 28 EISC Plan, direct, or coordinate research, instructional, student administration and services, and other educational activities at postsecondary institutions, including universities, colleges, and junior and community colleges. Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: 20 56 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree Adult literacy, remedial education, and GED teachers and instructors Elementary school teachers, except special education Kindergarten teachers, except special education Middle school teachers, except special and vocational education Secondary school teachers, except special and vocational education Special education teachers, preschool, kindergarten, and elementary school Teach or instruct out-of-school youths and adults in remedial education classes, preparatory classes for the General Educational Development test, literacy, or English as a Second Language. Teaching may or may not take place in a traditional educational institutions. High-end: $39,966 Median: $32,010 SA Low-end: $28,439 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 4 High-end: $50,815 SAI Teach pupils in public or private schools at the elementary level basic academic, social, and other formative skills. Median: $37,808 Low-end: $26,659 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 221 High-end: $44,216 SAI Teach elemental natural and social science, personal hygiene, music, art, and literature to children from 4 to 6 years old. Promote physical, mental, and social development. May be required to hold State certification. Teach students in public or private schools in one or more subjects at the middle, intermediate, or junior high level, which falls between elementary and senior high school as defined by applicable State laws and regulations. Instruct students in secondary public or private schools in one or more subjects at the secondary level, such as English, mathematics, or social studies. May be designated according to subject matter specialty. Teach elementary and preschool school subjects to educationally and physically handicapped students. Includes teachers who specialize and work with audibly and visually handicapped students and those who teach basic academic and life processes skills. Median: $32,761 Low-end: $24,834 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 16 High-end: $51,870 Median: $38,475 SAI Low-end: $26,711 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 62 High-end: $50,244 Median: $37,881 SAI Low-end: $27,104 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 161 High-end: $49,104 Median: $35,338 SAI Low-end: $28,171 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 High-end: $48,888 Training and development specialists Median: $39,670 SEC Conduct training and development programs for employees. Low-end: $33,655 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 19 Postsecondary Vocational Training Preschool teachers, except special education Instruct children (normally up to 5 years of age) in activities designed to promote social, physical, and intellectual growth needed for primary school in preschool, day care center, or other child development facility. May be required to hold State certification. Instruct or coach groups or individuals in exercise activities and the fundamentals of sports. Demonstrate techniques and methods of participation. Observe participants and inform them of corrective measures necessary to improve their skills. High-end: $37,835 Median: $26,822 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 SAC Low-end: $17,607 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 44 High-end: $24,183 Fitness trainers and aerobics instructors Median: $20,662 SA Low-end: $17,419 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 40 57 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Work Experience in a Related Occupation High-end: $32,365 Selfenrichment education teachers Vocational education teachers, postsecondary SA Teach or instruct courses other than those that normally lead to an occupational objective or degree. Courses may include selfimprovement, nonvocational, and nonacademic subjects. Teaching may or may not take place in a traditional educational institutions. Median: $25,178 Low-end: $16,279 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 29 High-end: $51,302 SRE Teach or instruct vocational or occupational subjects at the postsecondary level (but at less than the baccalaureate) to students who have graduated or left high school. Median: $40,657 Low-end: $26,797 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 10 Long-Term On-the-Job Training Instruct or coach groups or individuals in the fundamentals of sports. Demonstrate techniques and methods of participation. May evaluate athletes' strengths and weaknesses as possible recruits or to improve the athletes' technique to prepare them for competitions. High-end: $24,237 Median: $16,343 Coaches and scouts ERS Low-end: $14,672 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 56 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $22,611 Teacher assistants SCA Perform duties that are instructional in nature or deliver direct services to students or parents. Serve in a position for which a teacher or another professional has ultimate responsibility for the design and implementation of educational programs and services. Median: $19,169 Low-end: $16,403 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 118 GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION OCCUPATIONS Have you served as an officer of a club or organization? Do you like to plan and organize activities? Are you interested in politics? Would you like to work in another country? Are rules and laws important to you? MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 58 Through the national, state, and local governments, the public can express its will and make our way of life possible. Through government, individuals can act together to accomplish what cannot be done alone. Most of these actions are carried out only by the government. For example, the federal government includes the military for protection. It also includes ambassadors who represent us in foreign countries. It is Congress that passes laws. The Administration carries out and enforces those laws. You would find almost every occupation within the government. However, this Government and Public Administration career cluster focuses on those occupations that are unique. National Employment Outlook The job opportunities in the Federal Government are expected to decline. There are several reasons for this decrease. First, the government is cutting costs. Second, programs are using private contractors to do the work. Third, the implementation of programs is being turned over to state and local governments. In addition, there will be strong competition for any job openings. Employment opportunities in state and local governments are expected to increase. The growth is a result of increased demand for services at the state and local level. Also, Federal programs are being turned over to states. However, many state governments are experiencing budget problems. If the problems continue, states may have to cut costs and employees. In all levels of government, employment is affected by the increased use of technology. As a result, the need for office support workers will grow slowly. Pathways Governance In the Governance pathway, you would be an elected or appointed government official. You would be e in charge of making and carrying out public policy. This pathway includes the President and members of f Congress, governors, state legislators, and local elected officials. It also includes the staff members who o support them. You would work with the individuals s and groups you speak for in the government. National Security The military services protect the country and its citizens. In the National Security pathway, you might t run a hospital, operate a tank, program computers, or repair a helicopter. The military provides you with h training and experience. You could serve in the active Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast t Guard, their Reserve components, and the Air and d Army National Guard. Foreign Security People in the Foreign Security pathway work in embassies, consulates, or diplomatic missions and in n Washington, D.C. In your job, you may manage the e day-to-day operations of an embassy. Or you might t analyze political and economic events and give advice to Congress or the President. Or you might help American citizens abroad. Occupation Interest Profile Description Planning People who work in the Planning pathway develop plans for use of land. You would prepare for the growth of communities. In addition, you would help local officials make decisions about the best use of land and resources. Revenue and Taxation People who work in the Revenue and Taxation pathway collect taxes. The taxes provide the money the national, state, and local governments need to operate. Regulation People who work in the Regulation pathway protect our health, safety, and environment. You would make sure that our money, highways, airplanes, and power plants are safe. You would do inspections, audits, or investigations. Your goal is to enforce government rules and regulations. Public Management and Administration In Public Management and Administration, you would do the work of the government. You would implement the plans and programs developed by the elected officials. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Wages Outlook Long-Term On-the-Job Training Compliance officers, except agriculture, construction, health & safety, and transportation High-end: $56,747 CR Examine, evaluate, and investigate eligibility for or conformity with laws and regulations governing contract compliance of licenses and permits, and other compliance and enforcement inspection activities not classified elsewhere. Median: $42,753 Low-end: $34,129 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 19 59 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $31,905 Court, municipal, and license clerks CE Perform clerical duties in courts of law, municipalities, and governmental licensing agencies and bureaus. May prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges and court; prepare draft agendas or bylaws for town or city council. Interview persons by telephone, mail, in person, or by other means for the purpose of completing forms, applications, or questionnaires. Ask specific questions, record answers, and assist persons with completing form. May sort, classify, and file forms. Median: $27,022 Low-end: $22,972 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 High-end: $31,543 Interviewers, except eligibility and loan Median: $25,208 CE Low-end: $22,095 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 38 High-end: $48,440 Postal service mail carriers SCR Sort mail for delivery. Deliver mail on established route by vehicle or on foot. Median: $43,900 Low-end: $38,740 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 30 Postal service mail sorters, processors, and processing machine operators Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors High-end: $44,840 CR Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Examine, sort, and route mail by State, type of mail, or other scheme. Load, operate, and occasionally adjust and repair mail processing, sorting, and canceling machinery. Keep records of shipments. Median: $37,970 Low-end: $23,650 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 High-end: $33,463 R Collect and dump refuse or recyclable materials from containers into truck. May drive truck. Median: $27,047 Low-end: $22,392 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONS Do you help friends with their personal problems? Do you care about people and want to help them? Have you cared for children or done babysitting? Are you a good listener? Have you planned programs for school or community organizations? MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 60 In the Human Services cluster, you would work with individuals and families to meet their personal needs. National Employment Outlook You should be able to find jobs in human services in the future. The expected growth is partly due to expanded services for the elderly. In addition, the demand for childcare services is increasing. In the occupations in this cluster where wages are low, the turnover is high. Service for the mentally ill and disabled have been increasing. However, state and local governments might cut programs for these groups to deal with budget problems. Pathways Early Childhood Development and Services In the Early Childhood Development and Services pathway, you would care for and teach children. You would provide services in childcare centers, preschools, public schools, and private homes. Counseling and Mental Health Services In the Counseling and Mental Health Services pathway, you would assist people with their problems. The problems may be related to personal, family, educational, or career issues. You provide mental health care in hospitals, clinics, schools, or private offices. Family and Community Services Employees in the Family and Community Services pathway help individuals cope with daily living. You may counsel troubled individuals. Or you may help people get jobs by providing them with needed training. You might care for people who are elderly or have disabilities. Personal Care Services In the Personal Care Services pathway, you could assist individuals with their personal appearance. This might include cutting, coloring, and styling hair. Or you might give manicures, pedicures, and scalp and facial treatments. Also, within personal care services, you might make funeral arrangements for grieving families. Wages Outlook Occupation Interest Profile Description First Professional Degree High-end: $31,905 Clergy SAE Conduct religious worship and perform other spiritual functions associated with beliefs and practices of religious faith or denomination. Provide spiritual and moral guidance and assistance to members. Median: $27,022 Low-end: $22,972 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 26 Doctoral Degree High-end: $31,543 Clinical, counseling, and school psychologists ISA Diagnose and treat mental disorders; learning disabilities; and cognitive, behavioral, and emotional problems using individual, child, family, and group therapies. May design and implement behavior modification programs. Median: $25,208 Low-end: $22,095 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 16 Master’s Degree High-end: $48,440 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Mental health and substance abuse social workers SIA Assess and treat individuals with mental, emotional, or substance abuse problems, including abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and/or other drugs. Activities may include individual and group therapy, crisis intervention, case management, client advocacy. Counsel individuals to maximize the independence and employability of persons coping with personal, social, and vocational difficulties that result from birth defects, illness, disease, accidents, or the stress of daily life. Counsel and advise individuals with alcohol, tobacco, drug, or other problems, such as gambling and eating disorders. May counsel individuals, families, or groups or engage in prevention programs. Median: $43,900 Low-end: $38,740 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 High-end: $44,840 Median: $37,970 Rehabilitation counselors SIA Low-end: $23,650 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 Substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors High-end: $33,463 Median: $27,047 SIA Low-end: $22,392 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 26 61 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $40,841 Child, family, and school social workers SEA Provide social services and assistance to improve the social and psychological functioning of children and their families and to maximize the family well-being and the academic functioning of children. May assist single parents, and arrange adoptions. Direct and coordinate activities of a denominational group to meet religious needs of students. Plan, direct, or coordinate church school programs designed to promote religious education among church membership. Plan, organize, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Median: $34,556 Low-end: $27,386 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 29 High-end: $36,846 Directors, religious activities and education Social and community service managers Median: $29,428 SEA Low-end: $21,156 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 High-end: $49,843 Median: $34,994 SEA Low-end: $29,025 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 Postsecondary Vocational Training High-end: $26,392 Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists R Provide beauty services, such as shampooing, cutting, coloring, and styling hair, and massaging and treating scalp. May also apply makeup, dress wigs, perform hair removal, and provide nail and skin care services. Median: $20,087 Low-end: $16,134 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 42 High-end: $33,740 Median: $22,652 Massage therapists SR Massage customers for hygienic or remedial purposes. Low-end: $17,499 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $29,235 Social and human service assistants SCA Assist professionals from a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, or social work, to provide client services, as well as support for families. May assist clients in identifying available benefits and social and community services. Median: $23,955 Low-end: $18,996 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 83 Short-Term On-the-Job Training MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $19,661 Child care workers ESA Attend to children at schools, businesses, private households, and child care institutions. Perform a variety of tasks, such as dressing, feeding, bathing, and overseeing play. Assist elderly or disabled adults with daily living activities at the person's home or in a daytime non-residential facility. Duties performed at a place of residence may include keeping house (making beds, doing laundry, washing dishes) and preparing meals. Median: $17,005 Low-end: $14,910 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 262 High-end: $22,386 Median: $19,617 Personal and home care aides SE Low-end: $17,582 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 169 62 LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, AND SECURITY OCCUPATIONS Are you able to work under pressure? Can you work with various kinds of people? Do you like to help people? Can you work in the face of danger? Are you good at winning arguments? Do you instruct friends on laws and regulations? If you are interested in working in this cluster, you have several options. One option is to guard the public by enforcing the law. Or you might provide fire protection and security. Another option is to provide legal services people who commit crimes. National Employment Outlook Employment opportunities in law, public safety, and security depend on several factors. First of all, turnover will create job openings as people leave their jobs or retire. Work in law enforcement, fire protection, and corrections can be dangerous and stressful. These three areas also depend on government funding. To lower crime rates, more money has been budgeted to increase law enforcement. As a result, the prison population has increased. So, new jobs have been created. However, state and local governments are facing financial problems and may cut spending in these areas to balance budgets. The amount and types of legal services available have increased. As incomes increase, there is more money to spend on these services. However, law firms are relying more on the work of paralegals and are hiring fewer lawyers to provide those services. Pathways Correction Services Workers in the Correction Services specialty are responsible for watching people who have been arrested or who have been convicted of a crime. Your r primary mission would be to protect the public. In n addition, you might treat or educate the offenders. Or r you might work to help people leave corrections and d return to a life in the public. Emergency and Fire Management Services s Every year, fires and other emergencies take lives y and destroy property. Firefighters and emergency services workers help protect the public against these e l dangers. You might be the first emergency personnel at the scene of a traffic accident or medical emergency. In the Emergency and Fire management Services s pathway, you may be called upon to put out a fire, treat injuries, or perform other vital functions. treat injuries, or perform other vital functions. e inj Security and Protective Services Employees in the Security and Protective Services pathway often work in public buildings, factories, warehouses, government buildings, and military bases. You might protect products, computers and machines, laboratories, or other employees. You check people and vehicles and walk through hallways, rooms, and buildings. Or you may watch camera monitors. Law Enforcement Services People depend on police officers and detectives to protect their lives and property. In the Law Enforcement Services pathway, you might have duties that range from controlling traffic to investigating crimes. You would maintain order; enforce laws; issue traffic tickets; and investigate accidents. In addition, you would present evidence in court; serve legal documents for the court system; and arrest and process offenders. Legal Services The legal system affects nearly every aspect of our lives, from buying a home to crossing the street. For this reason, you would hold positions of great responsibility and are obligated to follow a strict code of ethics. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 63 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook First Professional Degree High-end: $84,597 Lawyers ECIS Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, and manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law. Median: $62,240 Low-end: $48,024 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 83 Associate Degree High-end: $44,332 Paralegals and legal assistants EC Assist lawyers by researching legal precedent, investigating facts, or preparing legal documents. Conduct research to support a legal proceeding, to formulate a defense, or to initiate legal action. Median: $33,192 Low-end: $27,402 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 26 Postsecondary Vocational Training High-end: $31,757 Legal secretaries CRE Perform secretarial duties utilizing legal terminology, procedures, and documents. Prepare legal papers and correspondence, such as summonses, complaints, motions, and subpoenas. May also assist with legal research. Median: $27,435 Low-end: $23,521 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 32 Work Experience in a Related Occupation Private detectives and investigators Detect occurrences of unlawful acts or infractions of rules in private establishment, or seek, examine, and compile information for client. RS Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: 5 Long-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $48,666 Fire fighters SCR Control and extinguish fires or respond to emergency situations where life, property, or the environment is at risk. Duties may include fire prevention, emergency medical service, hazardous material response, search and rescue, and disaster management. Maintain order, enforce laws and ordinances, and protect life and property in an assigned patrol district. Perform combination of following duties: patrol a specific area on foot or in a vehicle; direct traffic; issue traffic summonses; investigate accidents. Median: $41,419 Low-end: $35,165 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 33 High-end: $48,589 Police and sheriff 's patrol officers Median: $40,926 RS Low-end: $34,106 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 63 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $35,212 Correctional officers and jailers RC Guard inmates in penal or rehabilitative institution in accordance with established regulations and procedures. May guard prisoners in transit between jail, courtroom, prison, or other point. Median: $30,067 Low-end: $25,517 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 55 High-end: $32,423 Police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers CES Receive complaints from public concerning crimes and police emergencies. Broadcast orders to police patrol units in vicinity of complaint to investigate. Operate radio, telephone, or computer equipment to receive reports of fires and medical emergencies. Median: $27,590 Low-end: $23,543 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $28,694 Median: $23,231 Security guards ECS Guard, patrol, or monitor premises to prevent theft, violence, or infractions of rules. Low-end: $19,419 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 80 64 THIS CLUSTER INCLUDES: Architectue & Construction Occupations Manufacturing, Installation, & Repair Occupations Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math Occupations Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics Occupations ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION OCCUPATIONS Do you often admire the buildings around you? Do you like to work with tools, objects, & numbers? Do you like to create models or make designs? Can you visualize objects in your mind? Do you like to use both mental and manual skills to solve problems? If you work in occupations in the Architecture and Construction cluster, you would be responsible for buildings and other structures such as highways and bridges. You might make designs and plans for new structures. Or, you would use the plans to build new structures and manage construction workers. Another option would be to take care of, repair, and restore existing structures. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 National Employment Outlook If you are interested in working in construction, you will probably find a job. The job openings will vary with the different occupations. Many workers leave their jobs because of the hard physical work and uncomfortable working conditions. There will be more jobs in occupations that require skills that are technical and require more training. This includes bricklayers and stonemasons, electricians, sheet metal workers, and heating and cooling system mechanics. When interest rates are low, people get loans to build new houses. In addition, industrial companies are replacing old, outdated facilities. Hospitals and health care facilities are adding on to meet the needs of the aging population. These conditions result in more job opportunities. 65 Pathways Design/Pre-Construction In the Design and Pre-Construction pathway, you would create designs for the construction of cities, homes, and highways. You turn ideas into plans. Those plans would be used to guide construction workers as they build the actual structures. Construction In the Construction pathway, you would build cities, homes, and highways. You would put up or remodel buildings used for living and work or structures such as highways, streets, bridges, tunnels, and airports. Maintenance/Operations In the Maintenance and Operations pathway, you would take care of, repair, and restore cities, houses, and highways. You might repair and maintain factory equipment, highways and streets, schools and offices, or homes. In your work, you would detect problems and make recommendations for improvements. In some jobs, you would restore old structures to be like new. Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Bachelor’s Degree High-end: $66,735 Architects, except landscape and naval ARI Plan and design structures, such as private residences, office buildings, theaters, factories, and other structural property. Median: $51,019 Low-end: $40,362 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 27 High-end: $79,787 Construction managers ERC Plan, direct, coordinate, or budget, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction projects. Plan, design, and furnish interiors of residential, commercial, or industrial buildings. Formulate design which is practical, aesthetic, and conducive to intended purposes, such as raising productivity, selling merchandise, or improving life style. Make exact measurements and determine property boundaries. Provide data relevant to the shape, contour, gravitation, location, elevation, or dimension of land or land features on or near the earth's surface for engineering, mapmaking, mining, land evaluations purposes. Median: $57,798 Low-end: $45,177 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 114 High-end: $54,230 Interior designers Median: $36,910 AER Low-end: $23,601 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 12 High-end: $57,687 Median: $45,015 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Surveyors IER Low-end: $31,183 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 33 Postsecondary Vocational Training High-end: $44,049 Architectural and civil drafters RCA Prepare detailed drawings of architectural and structural features of buildings or drawings and topographical relief maps used in civil engineering projects, such as highways, bridges, and public works. Median: $36,102 Low-end: $27,835 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 20 High-end: $49,805 Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines RC Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul mobile mechanical, hydraulic, and pneumatic equipment, such as cranes, bulldozers, graders, and conveyors, used in construction, logging, and surface mining. Median: $42,096 Low-end: $32,504 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 44 66 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Work Experience in a Related Occupation First-line supervisors/managers of construction trades & extraction workers High-end: $64,097 Median: $51,775 RIC Directly supervise and coordinate activities of construction or extraction workers. Low-end: $41,944 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 131 Long-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $55,708 Brickmasons and blockmasons REC Lay and bind building materials, such as brick, structural tile, concrete block, cinder block, glass block, and terra-cotta block, with mortar and other substances to construct or repair walls, partitions, arches, sewers, and other structures. Cut, shape, and assemble wooden articles or set up and operate a variety of woodworking machines, such as power saws, jointers, and mortisers to surface, cut, or shape lumber or to fabricate parts for wood products. Construct, erect, install, or repair structures and fixtures made of wood, such as concrete forms; building frameworks, including partitions, joists, studding, and rafters; wood stairways, window and door frames, and hardwood floors. May also install cabinets. Install, maintain, and repair electrical wiring, equipment, and fixtures. Ensure that work is in accordance with relevant codes. May install or service street lights, intercom systems, or electrical control systems. Median: $46,009 Low-end: $35,103 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 22 High-end: $34,601 Cabinetmakers and bench carpenters Median: $28,594 R Low-end: $22,649 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 20 High-end: $40,062 Median: $33,782 Carpenters R Low-end: $27,905 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 450 High-end: $58,766 Median: $48,758 Electricians R Low-end: $38,163 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 138 Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters High-end: $46,335 RCE Install or repair heating, central air conditioning, or refrigeration systems, including oil burners, hot-air furnaces, and heating stoves. Median: $36,979 Low-end: $28,466 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 22 High-end: $56,518 RIC Assemble, install, alter, and repair pipelines or pipe systems that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases. May install heating and cooling equipment and mechanical control systems. Median: $47,890 Low-end: $35,648 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 116 High-end: $41,940 Stonemasons ERC Build stone structures, such as piers, walls, and abutments. Lay walks, curbstones, or special types of masonry for vats, tanks, and floors. Median: $33,885 Low-end: $28,991 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $40,921 Cement masons and concrete finishers R Smooth and finish surfaces of poured concrete, such as floors, walks, sidewalks, roads, or curbs using a variety of hand and power tools. Align forms for sidewalks, curbs, or gutters; patch voids; use saws to cut expansion joints. Median: $34,949 Low-end: $29,707 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 85 67 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $40,241 Construction laborers RC Perform tasks involving physical labor at building, highway, and heavy construction projects, tunnel and shaft excavations, and demolition sites. May operate hand and power tools of all types: air hammers, earth tampers, cement mixers, etc. Median: $32,560 Low-end: $26,111 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 206 High-end: $29,298 Fence erectors R Erect and repair metal and wooden fences and fence gates around highways, industrial establishments, residences, or farms, using hand and power tools. Maintain highways, municipal and rural roads, airport runways, and rights-of-way. Duties include patching broken or eroded pavement, repairing guard rails, highway markers, and snow fences. May also mow or clear brush from along road or plow snow from roadways. Operate one or several types of power construction equipment, such as motor graders, bulldozers, scrapers, compressors, pumps, derricks, shovels, tractors, or front-end loaders to excavate, move, and grade earth, erect structures, or pour concrete. Paint walls, equipment, buildings, bridges, and other structural surfaces, using brushes, rollers, and spray guns. May remove old paint to prepare surface prior to painting. May mix colors or oils to obtain desired color or consistency. Operate equipment used for applying concrete, asphalt, or other materials to road beds, parking lots, or airport runways and taxiways, or equipment used for tamping gravel, dirt, or other materials. Cover roofs of structures with shingles, slate, asphalt, aluminum, wood, and related materials. May spray roofs, sidings, and walls with material to bind, seal, insulate, or soundproof sections of structures. Median: $25,793 Low-end: $21,350 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 27 High-end: $39,023 Median: $34,297 Highway maintenance workers Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators Painters, construction and maintenance Paving, surfacing, and tamping equipment operators RC Low-end: $29,304 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 High-end: $48,445 Median: $40,887 RC Low-end: $34,713 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 121 High-end: $38,448 Median: $32,306 RC Low-end: $27,459 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 95 High-end: $42,152 Median: $36,082 R Low-end: $30,955 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 15 High-end: $33,484 Median: $26,968 Roofers R Low-end: $23,124 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 37 Woodworking machine setters, operators, and tenders, except sawing High-end: $36,533 R Set up, operate, or tend woodworking machines, such as drill presses, lathes, shapers, routers, sanders, planers, and wood nailing machines. Median: $29,707 Low-end: $22,501 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 18 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $29,043 Helpers-carpenters R Help carpenters by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. Median: $24,620 Low-end: $20,160 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 49 68 MANUFACTURING, INSTALLATION, AND REPAIR OCCUPATIONS Are you good at working with your hands? Can you explain to others how a machine works? Can you visualize how a machine works? Do you set up or repair stereo equipment? Do you enjoy reading about the latest developments in electronics? In the Manufacturing, Installation, and Repair career cluster, you can choose one of several options. You might design a new product or determine how the product will be made. Another option is to make the product. The final option is to install and repair the product once it has been purchased. National Employment Outlook Job opportunities in manufacturing are expected to continue to be limited in the future. Improvements in technology and production equipment means fewer workers are needed to make more products. In addition, many companies are moving production to other countries where wages are lower. Installation and repair will also need fewer workers in the future. Products are more reliable and need fewer repairs. Also, many products cost less which means consumers replace the item rather than repair it. Many stores are part of a large chain that provides repair and installation services. These large businesses hire fewer workers and do not use the self employed repair shops. and do not use the self-employed repair shops. Pathways Production In the Production pathway, you might work for large companies or small shops. You would create the parts needed to make products sold to consumers. Or, you would assemble the parts into products. Manufacturing Production Process Development In the Manufacturing Production Process Development, you would be involved with design and planning. You might design new products. Then you would decide and plan how the product is going to be made. You would work with production workers to set up machines to turn out the new manufactured goods. Maintenance, Installation, and Repair Once products are sold and delivered to customers, workers in Maintenance, Installation, and Repair take over. You might install the product in a home or business. If there were problems with the item, you would be called upon to make repairs. Another option would be to make sure that the product is always working properly. Quality Assurance The production process may have many steps and products can have many parts. As a result, the work of employees in the Quality Assurance, pathway is very important. You would make sure that manufactured goods meet the design standards and work properly and safely. If there are problems in production, you might be asked to find the cause and propose a solution. Logistics and Inventory Control For manufacturing to go smoothly, workers need the materials to make the products. If they have to wait, the company loses money. In the Logistics and Inventory Control pathway, you get materials to the production workers. You might order the items or check them into the company warehouse when they are delivered. Or, you might deliver the materials to the assembly area. In addition, you could pack and ship the finished products. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 69 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Work Experience in a Related Occupation First-line supervisors/managers of mechanics, installers, & repairers First-line supervisors/managers of production & operating workers High-end: $71,088 Median: $55,889 RC Supervise and coordinate the activities of mechanics, installers, and repairers. Low-end: $42,186 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 57 High-end: $63,291 RC Supervise and coordinate the activities of production and operating workers, such as inspectors, precision workers, machine setters and operators, assemblers, fabricators, and plant and system operators. Median: $46,608 Low-end: $36,074 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 31 Long-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $73,439 Electrical power-line installers and repairers RC Install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems. May erect poles and light or heavy duty transmission towers. Median: $62,885 Low-end: $55,088 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 38 High-end: $61,863 Industrial machinery mechanics R Repair, install, adjust, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems. Median: $54,079 Low-end: $44,344 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 23 High-end: $41,959 Machinists RC Set up and operate a variety of machine tools to produce precision parts and instruments. Includes precision instrument makers who fabricate, modify, or repair mechanical instruments. May also fabricate and modify parts to make or repair machine tools. Median: $35,760 Low-end: $29,627 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 29 High-end: $45,174 Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers REA Use hand-welding, flame-cutting, hand soldering, or brazing equipment to weld or join metal components or to fill holes, indentations, or seams of fabricated metal products. Median: $35,078 Low-end: $28,398 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 64 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $39,184 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Inspectors, testers, sorters, samplers, and weighers Maintenance and repair workers, general RC Inspect, test, sort, sample, or weigh nonagricultural raw materials or processed, machined, fabricated, or assembled parts or products for defects, wear, and deviations from specifications. May use precision measuring instruments and complex test equipment. Perform work involving the skills of two or more maintenance or craft occupations to keep machines, mechanical equipment, or the structure of an establishment in repair. Duties may involve pipe fitting; boiler making; insulating; welding; machining; carpentry. Median: $29,869 Low-end: $22,790 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 8 High-end: $39,114 Median: $32,263 R Low-end: $23,599 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 82 High-end: $42,042 Sheet metal workers R Fabricate, assemble, install, and repair sheet metal products and equipment, such as ducts, control boxes, drainpipes, and furnace casings. Median: $33,910 Low-end: $24,432 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 29 70 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training Work as part of a team having responsibility for assembling an entire product or component of a product. Team assemblers can perform all tasks conducted by the team in the assembly process and rotate through all or most of them rather than being assigned to a specific duty. High-end: $30,844 Median: $25,268 Team assemblers R Low-end: $20,200 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 65 Short-Term On-the-Job Training Helpers-installation, maintenance, and repair workers Helpers-production workers Help installation, maintenance, and repair workers in maintenance, parts replacement, and repair of vehicles, industrial machinery, and electrical and electronic equipment. Perform duties, such as furnishing tools, materials, and supplies to other workers. Help production workers by performing duties of lesser skill. Duties include supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment. High-end: $28,690 Median: $22,234 RC Low-end: $18,157 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 28 High-end: $33,061 Median: $25,407 RCI Low-end: $20,160 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 91 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATH OCCUPATIONS Is science one of your favorite subjects? Do you prepare projects for science fairs? Do you enjoy reading science magazines? Are you detail-oriented? Do you like to know how things work? Are you a “numbers person”? If you choose to work in the Science, Technology, Engineering, or Mathematics cluster, you have several avenues. One avenue is to do scientific research in laboratories or the field. Another option is to be involved in the planning and design of products and systems. The last avenue is to provide support to the scientists, mathematicians, and engineers so they can do their work. National Employment Outlook The job opportunities in engineering are expected to increase slowly in the near future. Companies are turning more to engineers to help improve product design and increase productivity. In addition, the number of students graduating from engineering programs is not increasing. However, improvements in technology mean that one engineer can work on multiple projects at different locations at one time. In addition, many engineering jobs are related to the national defense and defense expenditures in those areas are not increasing. Many scientists depend on federal funding for their research projects. Federal spending is decreasing. The number of students graduating from science programs is increasing. As a result, it is more difficult to obtain grants for research. The prospects for people with a bachelor’s or master’s degrees are improving. Job growth will be concentrated in the areas of biotechnology and pharmacy. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 71 Pathways Science and Mathematics Those who choose careers in the Science and Mathematics pathway apply knowledge and skills in the real world. Your goal would be to improve the physical and human environment. In your work, you would engage in discovery to gather and process data to solve problems. Interest Profile Engineering and Technology To work in the Engineering and Technology pathway, you would solve problems involving design, development, or production. You would work on projects to evaluate problems and develop and test solutions. You could also provide advice and consultation. Occupation Description Wages Outlook Master’s Degree Environmental scientists and specialists, including health High-end: $56,114 IR Conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. Utilizes knowledge of various scientific disciplines. Median: $46,998 Low-end: $40,871 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 46 Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, plus Work Experience High-end: $93,719 Natural sciences managers IER Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields. Median: $80,795 Low-end: $70,103 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 11 Bachelor’s Degree Perform engineering duties in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures, and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, water and sewage systems, and waste disposal units. Includes architectural, structural, traffic, ocean, and geo-technical engineers. Manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands from fire and rodent damage. High-end: $76,788 Median: $62,480 Civil Engineers RIC Low-end: $53,683 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 47 High-end: $68,994 Median: $56,639 Conservation scientists IR Low-end: $44,452 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 21 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 High-end: $79,752 Electrical engineers RI Design, develop, test, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. Perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, machines, and other mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of such equipment as centralized heat, gas, water, and steam systems. Median: $67,437 Low-end: $56,894 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 17 High-end: $78,096 Median: $59,826 Mechanical engineers RI Low-end: $48,075 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 13 Associate Degree High-end: $47,271 Civil engineering technicians RIC Apply theory and principles of civil engineering in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of structures and facilities under the direction of engineering staff or physical scientists. Median: $41,273 Low-end: $32,588 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 16 72 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $43,873 Surveying and mapping technicians RCI Perform surveying and mapping duties, usually under the direction of a surveyor, cartographer, or photogrammetrist to obtain data used for construction, mapmaking, boundary location, mining, or other purposes. Median: $33,984 Low-end: $27,713 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 27 TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND LOGISTICS Do you have good eyesight and quick reflexes? Can you estimate distances accurately? Would you like to learn to fly an airplane? Do you repair your family’s and friends’ vehicles? Do you read automotive or mechanical magazines? Have you driven a truck or tractor to do farm work? If you are interested in working in this cluster, you have three avenues. One is to move people and products by road, air, rail, or water. You would drive or pilot different means of transportation. The second is to repair and maintain the vehicles, trains, planes, and ships to keep people and products moving. The third option is to work behind the scenes to make sure the products and people get to the right place on time. National Employment Outlook The demand for trucking and warehousing services is expected to increase. This means new jobs will be created. In addition, each year truck drivers leave the occupation because of the long periods away from home and the long hours of driving. The employment opportunities in rail transportation are not expected to increase. As a result of improved technology, fewer workers are needed to arrange and operate trains. Pathways Transportation Operations In the Transportation Operations cluster, you would drive trucks or pilot trains, planes, or ships that carry goods and people around the country or world. Or you would provide the support to make sure that cargo and passengers are safe and secure and arrive on time. Logistics Planning and Management To get products to a location, a company may have to use different types of transportation. For example, to get a product from China to your home town, a company might use ships, trains, and trucks. This is a complex process. In the Logistics Planning and Management pathway, you would make sure products arrive when and where they should at the lowest cost. Warehousing and Distribution Center Operations In the Warehousing and Distribution Center Operations pathway, employees work at ports, terminals, or warehouses. You would receive, sort, label, and load products. Your job is to make sure items from all over the world are delivered to the right place on time. MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 73 Facility and Mobile Equipment Maintenance Transportation relies on equipment. It must work properly when needed. In the Facility and Mobile Equipment Maintenance pathway, you would keep machinery running and fueled. You would also look for ways to operate equipment safely but for less money. Infrastructure Planning and Management In the Transportation Systems/Infrastructure Planning, Management, and Regulation pathway, you would design and operate transportation systems. These systems include airports, railroads, and interstate highways. Or you might enforce laws and regulations to make travel safer. Many of the employees in this pathway work for government agencies. Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Postsecondary Vocational Training High-end: $44,435 Automotive service technicians and mechanics Bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists Median: $33,427 RCE Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul automotive vehicles. Low-end: $25,881 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 147 High-end: $51,746 RC Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul trucks, buses, and all types of diesel engines. Includes mechanics working primarily with automobile diesel engines. Median: $38,909 Low-end: $31,176 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 42 Work Experience in a Related Occupation First-line supervisors/ managers of transportation & materialmoving machine & vehicle operators High-end: $58,489 Median: $44,118 RIC Directly supervise and coordinate activities of transportation and material-moving machine and vehicle operators and helpers. Low-end: $33,171 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 21 Locomotive Engineers RC Drive electric, diesel-electric, steam, or gas-turbine-electric locomotives to transport passengers or freight. Interpret train orders, electronic or manual signals, and railroad rules and regulations. Information Not Available Projected Average Annual Openings: 29 Long-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $41,696 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 Automotive body and related repairers ERC Repair and refinish automotive vehicle bodies and straighten vehicle frames. Median: $34,221 Low-end: $27,326 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 43 Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $29,894 Bus drivers, transit and intercity RC Drive bus or motor coach, including regular route operations, charters, and private carriage. May assist passengers with baggage. May collect fares or tickets. Median: $24,808 Low-end: $21,895 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 9 High-end: $40,194 Dispatchers, except police, fire, and ambulance CSE Schedule and dispatch workers, work crews, equipment, or service vehicles for conveyance of materials, freight, or passengers, or for normal installation, service, or emergency repairs rendered outside the place of business. Median: $31,928 Low-end: $26,742 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 25 74 Occupation Interest Profile Description Wages Outlook Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $45,117 Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer RS Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 GVW, to transport and deliver goods, livestock, or materials in liquid, loose, or packaged form. May be required to unload truck. May require use of automated routing equipment. Median: $35,119 Low-end: $27,794 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 218 Short-Term On-the-Job Training High-end: $30,043 Bus drivers, school R Transport students or special clients, such as the elderly or persons with disabilities. Ensure adherence to safety rules. May assist passengers in boarding or exiting. Median: $24,370 Low-end: $19,934 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 65 High-end: $20,366 Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment RC Wash or otherwise clean vehicles, machinery, and other equipment. Use such materials as water, cleaning agents, brushes, cloths, and hoses. Median: $17,634 Low-end: $15,368 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 76 High-end: $35,361 Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators REC Operate industrial trucks or tractors equipped to move materials around a warehouse, storage yard, factory, construction site, or similar location. Median: $29,998 Low-end: $26,519 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 34 High-end: $29,242 Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand RC Manually move freight, stock, or other materials or perform other unskilled general labor. Includes all unskilled manual laborers not elsewhere classified. Median: $23,220 Low-end: $18,772 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 201 High-end: $22,889 Packers and Packagers, Hand Median: $17,528 RC Pack or package by hand a wide variety of products and materials. Low-end: $14,959 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 19 Shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks RC Verify and keep records on incoming and outgoing shipments. Prepare items for shipment. Duties include assembling, addressing, stamping, and shipping merchandise or material; receiving, unpacking, verifying and recording incoming merchandise or material. High-end: $32,239 Median: $24,891 Low-end: $20,790 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 60 High-end: $24,443 Median: $18,048 Taxi drivers and chauffeurs RC Drive automobiles, vans, or limousines to transport passengers. May occasionally carry cargo. Low-end: $14,836 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 16 High-end: $28,443 Tire repairers and changers Median: $23,322 RC Repair and replace tires. Low-end: $19,950 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 34 High-end: $31,640 Truck drivers, light or delivery services ERS Drive a truck or van with a capacity of under 26,000 GVW, primarily to deliver or pick up merchandise or to deliver packages within a specified area. May require use of automatic routing or location software. May load and unload truck. Median: $23,098 Low-end: $16,461 $0 $20K $40K $60K $80K $100K $120K Projected Average Annual Openings: 153 75 76 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 NOTES: MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 NOTES: 77 78 MONTANA CAREER GUIDE 2009 NOTES: Department of Labor and Industr y BUREAU MONTANA CAREER RESOURCE NET WORK www.ourfactsyourfuture.org P. O. Box 1728 Phone: (406) 444-2430 Helena, MT 59624-1728 Toll-free: (800) 541-3904 www.ourfactsyourfuture.org Fax: (406) 444-2638 20,000 copies of this public document were published at an estimated cost of $0.39 per copy, for a total cost of $7,851, which includes $6,024 for printing and $1,827 for distribution. ...
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