240QIN09 - THE RISE OF QIN Legalism in Action Qin was one...

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THE RISE OF QIN Legalism in Action
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Qin was one of the states in the Warring States Era At the bend of the Yellow River, where Zhou had been.
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The Kingdom of Qin and its Rise to Victory Spring and Autumn Annals era—in the life time of Confucius— there were many states —about fifteen. The several big ones included Qin, Qi, Chu, and Jin.
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Qin survives! In Warring States period, only a few states survived. Those states fought each other fiercely for control of land, population, and resources. The one state that conquered all the others was Qin
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Qin had a good location. In the Wei River Valley, economic advantages: 1. Most productive soil in all China. 2. One of the first states to develop irrigation. It was on the edge of Chinese area. Gained experience from fighting with non-Chinese. Less hampered than some other states by feudal customs.
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Qin gives Legalism a bad name. Given to brutality and expansion. 260 B.C. when Qin conquered Zhao (former part of Jin), slaughtered the whole surrendered army, reportedly 400,000 men. Because they were on the edge of Chinese territory, there were places they could expand to without having to fight Chinese.
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Expansion into Sichuan In 316, Qin had expanded its resources without increasing vulnerability by expanding into Sichuan (fertile but surrounded by mountains). Also got minerals and lumber.
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Sichaun
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instance, Lord Shang [A soldier] From Wei. Chief counselor of Qin from 356 to 338 B.C. a. Improved agriculture. b. Improved public order. Policies a. Had farmers pay taxes b. Centralized administration. Introduced xian=county. c. Suppressed hereditary
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2010 for the course MGMT 201 taught by Professor Rowe during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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240QIN09 - THE RISE OF QIN Legalism in Action Qin was one...

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