Edo09 - Edo Japan 1603-1800 Political Power National...

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Edo Japan, 1603-1800 Political Power, National Integration, and Creative Tensions
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The review sheet has been posted! On founders of the dynasty, you MAY make passing mention of what their immediate successors did. On comparison of societies, use all cultural knowledge! On comparison of persons, think broadly: Inherited status? Answered to anyone else? Who was his successor?
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Taiwan, etc. We are often confused about places on the periphery; they speak English in Bermuda and Nova Scotia, but neither is part of the United States. Tibet IS part of the PRC, but some Tibetans protest. The PRC regards Taiwan as part of its territory, BUT the territory is not currently ruled by the PRC.
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POWER How did Tokugawa Ieyasu and his successors go about establishing a system that prevented anyone else from rising to power as Ieyasu had done and overthrowing the Tokugawa family?
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Secured imperial approval; Emperor named him shogun, 1603 Provided income for the emperor. Used Nijo Castle to limit access to emperor. Married his son Hidetada’s daughter to Emperor. Declared emperor’s duty to be scholarship. Visited Kyoto with army. Nijo Castle
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Sources of his strength Owned one quarter of Japan Military lord over the rest, thanks to military victory at Sekigahara. Eliminate single most powerful enemy, Hideyoshi’s heir Hideyori, Osaka, 1615.
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Establish powerful stronghold at Edo Castle.
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Shogun’s part of Japan included Kyoto, Osaka, and Nagasaki Nijo Castle in Kyoto
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Osaka Castle, 1931 version
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How big was this castle?
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Layout of Osaka Castle
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View from the top of Osaka Castle
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Nagasaki, Trade with Dutch and Chinese
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Dutch presenting two camels as gifts to the shogun.
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Unregulated foreign influence regarded as a threat to order. Trade loses specie. Import of weapons dangerous to peace. Missionary work subversive to political order. Shimabara rebellion, 1637, Christian rebels. Closed country; trade in limited places, no one abroad. Shimabara Castle
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Foreign contact through Ryūkyū islands, Korean embassies (Tsushima)
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Shuri Castle, where the Okinawan king lived. King vassal of Satsuma, China
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Trade with Ainu through Matsumae Domain Hokkaido just barely part of Japan Matsumae Castle
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Shogun Military Lord over 260 Daimyo; shared governance.
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