Untitled1_27 - population. The dose reached a peak shortly...

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Radiological Emergency Management Independent Study Course 1-10 Table 1-1 Annual Whole Body Radiation Dose Rates in the United States* Source Average Annual Dose % of Total mSv/year mrem/year Natural background (cosmic, terrestrial, internal) Medical radiation X-rays Radiopharmaceuticals Fallout (weapons testing) Nuclear industry Research Consumer products Airlines Travel Transport of radiopharmaceuticals 0.82 0.77 0.14 0.04-0.05 <0.01 <<0.01 0.03-0.04 0.005 0.0001 __________ 1.84 82 77 14 4-5 <1 <<1 3-4 0.5 0.01 __________ 184 44.6 41.8 7.6 2.4 <0.5 <<0.5 1.9 0.3 0.005 __________ 100% *Adapted from BEIR (1980), pp. 66-67. O Fallout from weapons testing: Some of the radioactive materials created during a nuclear test were injected into the highest region of the atmosphere and carried around the earth several times. They gradually returned to the earth over a period of a few years and consequently gave doses to the
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Unformatted text preview: population. The dose reached a peak shortly after each weapon test. For some population, minute amounts of radioactive strontium atoms concentrated in the body's skeleton and radioactive cesium atoms were distributed throughout the body. O Occupational exposure: Occupational exposure is exposure to individuals such as nuclear energy workers, industrial users of radioactive materials, and medical personnel who encounter radioactive materials as part of their jobs. Because the number of these individuals is limited, the dose from all occupational exposure is very small (approximately 0.5 mrem/year or 0.005 mSv/year) when averaged over the entire population....
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