is3_81 - Ingestion Exposure Radioactive material from a...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Unit 3 Nuclear Power Plant Accidents 3-21 Contamination Exposure Radioactive fission products can also present a hazard through direct contact with the exposed individuals. Contact with a plume can result in contamination of a person's clothing or skin. Airborne radioactive materials may also present an internal exposure hazard if inhaled by individuals exposed to the passing radioactive plume. Inhaled material, in addition to directly providing a dose, contains certain elements that concentrate in particular organs (e.g., lungs, bones, or thyroid) and thus become a special threat to those organs. When taking shelter from a radioactive plume, one should take care to prevent unnecessary exposure to airborne radioactive material by closing windows and turning off air conditioners and ventilation fans. Additional protection actions may be recommended by the local authorities.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Ingestion Exposure Radioactive material from a radioactive plume may be ingested by man from a variety of pathways. For example, radioactive particles deposited on the ground may be eaten by grazing cattle whose meat or milk is consumed by man. Ingestion Pathway Example: Milk The public should heed official warnings to prevent this sort of exposure. In addition, state and local officials will conduct tests to determine if there are problems with local food, water or milk supplies. Special protective actions are available to prevent exposure to radioactive iodine. Iodine is a major fission product which may be released during nuclear power plant accidents. Iodine is of particular interest because it tends to concentrate in the thyroid gland, just as iron concentrates in blood or calcium in bone....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/29/2010 for the course MPA mpa1 taught by Professor Scotts during the Spring '10 term at Acton School of Business.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online