is3_95 - Miles 20 40 Test Site 10 N 10 1 100 1,000 1...

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Radiological Emergency Management Independent Study Course 4-8 O Nature of surface beneath explosion--some materials are more likely to become radioactive and to become airborne. O Meteorological conditions--wind speed and direction will affect the arrival time of fallout; precipitation may wash out fallout from the atmosphere prematurely. Distribution of Fallout The irregularity of the fallout distribution is demonstrated in the figure below, which shows the fallout patterns of two separate Nevada weapons tests. The high altitude winds of the day play a major role in determining the fallout distribution pattern. In Test-1, the winds carried fallout predominately to the north. In Test-2, the winds initially carried fallout to the west, then shifted to the northeast. The numbers associated with each gradient of fallout represents the dose rate (in mRAD/hr) in that area.
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Unformatted text preview: Miles 20 40 Test Site 10 N 10 1 100 1,000 1 mRAD/HR Miles 20 40 Test Site 10 1 m RAD/HR N 100 100 500 TEST 1 TEST 2 Effect of High-Altitude Winds on Fallout Distribution Emergency plans state that the expected time of fallout arrival will be announced during an official public warning. However, any notice of an increasing surface buildup of gritty dust and dirt should be a warning of a need for protective measures. PROTECTIVE MEASURES The previous section described the different types of hazards from a nuclear detonation. This section describes the types of protective actions one can take to minimize the harmful effects of an explosion. The protective actions against immediate blast hazards are much different than the protective measures against fallout....
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