PSIO467Sessions09+10_1 - P S IO 4 6 7 S e p te m b e r 2 2...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PSIO 467 September 22 and 24, 2009 Erik J. Henriksen, Ph.D. Sessions 9 and 10: Glucose Metabolism Major Learning Objectives for Sessions 9 and 10: 1. The student will understand the general concepts regarding the roles of the liver, brain, skeletal muscle, and pancreas in the regulation of normal plasma glucose levels, and will appreciate the consequences of deviations from the set-point for this variable. 2. The student will understand the hormonal regulation of hepatic glucose production and the roles of fats cells and skeletal muscle in modifying this process. 3. The student will understand the tissue distribution and functions of the primary glucose transporter proteins.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Major Learning Objectives for Sessions 9 and 10 (continued): 4. The student will understand the regulation of glucose transport and metabolism in skeletal muscle by endocrine factors and by contractile activity, including the relevant enzymes, signaling factors, and GLUT-4 translocation. 5. The student will understand the integration of organs systems that must take place in order to effectively dispose of a carbohydrate load, such as after a meal, and will appreciate the defects in this integration that underlie the insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes. 6. The student will understand the integration of organ systems that must take place in order to maintain glucose homeostasis during a dramatic increase in glucose demand by skeletal muscle, such as during a prolonged bout of exercise.
Background image of page 2
I. Maintenance of normal blood glucose levels A. Normal blood glucose levels: 70-100 mg/dl; euglycemia = 90 mg/dl 1. Function of the balance between glucose production and glucose removal: ( Fig. 1 ) Liver [Blood Glucose] 10 g/hr (rest) 46 g/hr (exercise) Brain 6 g/hr (rest) 6 g/hr (exercise) + Fat Liver Skeletal Muscle 4 g/hr (rest) 40 g/hr (exercise) Figure 1.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
B. Consequences of pathological deviations from normal set-point 1. Hypoglycemia problematic even in acute state: neurological impairment 2. Hyperglycemia problematic primarily in chronic state: complications due to excess glycosylation of proteins and oxidative stress: cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy • diagnosis of diabetes: > 126 mg/dl in fasting state
Background image of page 4
1. Ingestion of carbohydrate meal or liquid; example: OGTT ( Fig. 2 ) Acute increase in blood glucose Glucose Response Glucose Response Insulin Response Insulin Response 0 100 200 300 Glucose (mg/dl) 0 Insulin (μU/ml) 20 40 60 80 0 60
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/30/2010 for the course PSIO 467 taught by Professor Henriksen during the Fall '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

Page1 / 25

PSIO467Sessions09+10_1 - P S IO 4 6 7 S e p te m b e r 2 2...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online