Lecture 4--Colligative Properties in Solutions

Lecture 4--Colligative Properties in Solutions -...

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Colligative Properties in Solutions Ch 302, Fall 2009 B. A. Rowland September 11, 2009
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Outline We have discussed many properties of solutions. Here’s what we know: Electrolytic Properties. Miscibility/Solubility Concentration. Vapor Pressure with non-volatile and volatile substances. The Classius-Clapeyron Equation Henry’s Law. One remaining set of properties are collectively known as the colligative properties .
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Colligative Properties: An Introduction In the previous lecture, we saw how a nonvolatile solute affects the vapor pressure of a liquid solvent. Remember that phase changes are dependant on the vapor pressure of the solution. This means that the addition of a solute will change the freezing and boiling points as compared to the pure solvent. A colligative property is one which depends only on the number of solute particles , and not their identity. Boiling Points rise with increasing solute concentration. Freezing Points fall with increasing solute concentration. Solutions can undergo osmosis through a semi-
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The van’t Hoff Factor Since colligative properties depend on the number of solute particles, it is important to distinguish between electrolytic solutions and non- electrolytic solutions. This is achieved through the use of the van’t Hoff Factor ( i ). i will appear in all the colligative property equations. Non-electrolytes don’t dissociate in solutions. Therefore, 1 mole of a non- electrolyte will produce 1 mole of solute in the solution. In this case, i = 1. Electrolytes do dissociate in solutions. You must count all ions produced from the dissociation of the electrolytic solute. Solute
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2010 for the course GOV 312L taught by Professor Madrid during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Lecture 4--Colligative Properties in Solutions -...

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