Spring_2008_Breaking_the_Problem_Down_Problem_Solving_in_OO_Computer_Science

Spring_2008_Breaking - 1 Breaking the Problem Down Problem Solving in Object-Oriented Computer Science Breaking the Problem Down Problem Solving in

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Spring 2008 CS 1316: Representing Structure and Behavior Dawn Finney 1 Breaking the Problem Down: Problem Solving in Object-Oriented Computer Science Breaking the Problem Down: Problem Solving in Object-Oriented Computer Science Sometimes it is just hard to get started. Faced with a long problem or project description, you may wonder why a long list of do this and that was not provided to make your life simpler. Project descriptions usually just include an overview of the project, because there are actually many ways to solve the problem or achieve some purpose. How to approach a problem How do we actually approach the problem? One way to think about a problem is to consider it as interactions between entities or components within a system. Two methods of this form of interpretation are the top-down approach and the bottom-up approach. The top-down approach is sometimes considered the “big picture” approach, because the general idea of the system is first formulated and without getting down to the lowest level, or base, entities. The system, or big picture, is then broken down into slightly smaller subsystems. Those subsystems are then separated again until we reach the very bottom level when no more break down can really occur. Essentially the top-down approach is similar to dissembling a jigsaw puzzle. The bottom-up approach is the opposite of the top- down approach, because the bottom-up approach first considers the lowest level entities first and their interaction with one another which build subsystems. These subsystems will interact with each to form greater subsystems and slowly build our way up to the highest system. Using the same jigsaw analogy, the bottom-up approach is similar to assembling the puzzle. The top-down and bottom-up just describes two different general methods of thinking and interpreting some situation. How a given situation is actually perceived and processed will vary with the person and the given, but the idea is to do whatever is best for you to understand. Problem solving in object-oriented computer science
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2010 for the course CS 1316 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Spring_2008_Breaking - 1 Breaking the Problem Down Problem Solving in Object-Oriented Computer Science Breaking the Problem Down Problem Solving in

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