PoetryReadings_shuen-fulin

PoetryReadings_shuen-fulin - 1 Poetry and High Culture from...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Poetry and High Culture from Tang through Song Shuen-fu Lin December 1, 2005 Examples of Shi Poetry: 1. Chen Ziang (661-702): Song on Climbing Youzhou Gate Tower Behind me I do not see the ancient men, before me I do not see the ones to come. Thinking of the endlessness of heaven and earth, alone in despair, my tears fall down. (Tr. Burton Watson) 2. Meng Haoran (680-740): In Spring one sleeps absent to morning Then everywhere hears the birds singing: After all night the voice of the storm And petals fell-- who knows how many? (Tr. Arthur Cooper) 3. Wang Han (8th c.): Song of Liang-zhou Sweet wine of the grape, cup of phosphorescent jade, at the point of drinking, mandolins play on horseback, urging us on. If I lie down drunk in the desert, do not laugh at me!-- men marched to battle since times long ago, and how many ever returned? (Tr. Stephen Owen) 4. Wang Wei (ca. 699-761): Watching a Hunt The wind blows hard, the hornbow sings, 2 the general hunts by Weis old walls. The plants stripped bare, the hawks eye keen, where the snow is gone, horse hooves move light. All at once they are past Xin-feng Market, then back once more to Thin-Willow Camp. I turn to look where the eagle was shot: a thousand miles of twilight clouds hang Fat. (Tr. Stephen Owen) 5. Wang Wei: Deer ence Empty hills, no one in sight, only the sound of someone talking; late sunlight enters the deep wood, shining over the green moss again. (Tr. Burton Watson) 6. Wang Wei: Seeing Someone Off We dismount; I give you wine and ask, where are you off to? You answer, nothing goes right!-- back home to lie down by Southern Mountain. Go then -- Ill ask no more -- theres no end to white clouds there. (Tr. Burton Watson) 7. Li Bai (701-762): The Ballad of Changgan (The River Merchants Wife) While my hair was still cut straight across my forehead I played about the front gate, pulling Fowers. You came by on bamboo stilts, playing horse, You walked about my seat, playing with blue plums. And we went on living in the village of Chokan: Two small people, without dislike or suspicion. At fourteen I married My Lord you. I never laughed, being bashful. Lowering my head, I looked at the wall. Called to, a thousand times, I never looked back. At fteen I stopped scowling, 3 I desired my dust to be mingled with yours Forever and forever and forever. Why should I climb the look out? At sixteen you departed, You went into far Ku-to-yen, by the river of swirling eddies, And you have been gone ve months. The monkeys make sorrowful noise overhead. You dragged your feet when you went out. By the gate now, the moss is grown, the different mosses, Too deep to clear them away! The leaves fall early this autumn, in wind....
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PoetryReadings_shuen-fulin - 1 Poetry and High Culture from...

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