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lecture 1 outine - Lecture 1 Introductions Course Documents...

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Lecture 1, January 19, 2010 Introductions Course Documents available on Blackboard Course Syllabus Exams Attendance Discussion sessions Term paper Philosophy of teaching Plan for course Two major parts: Part 1: Cell biology of neurons; Part 2: How systems of neurons work Plan for today Structure of neurons, a bit of history, survey of a reflex circuit and its use of potentials Cell membrane Introduction to the Nervous System Brain and spinal cord (CNS): neurons (10 11 ) and glia (outnumber neurons 10:1), axons, connective tissue, blood vessels, some cells derived from the immune system Peripheral nerves (bundles of axons), ganglia (collections of neuron somata in PNS); nerves are spinal nerves and cranial nerves. Nerves and ganglia contain glial cells. Structure of a simple neuron axon, dendrites, cell body (soma), nerve terminals, synapse, microtubules, neurofilaments, cytoskeleton, myelin, glial cell A bit of history: Neuron doctrine Controversy between Cajal and Golgi, syncytial theory vs. neuron doctrine.
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Nobel prize winners in 1906 web sites available via external links on Blackboard Illustration of What Kinds of Things Need to be Explained Reflex circuit Anatomy: extensor muscle (quadriceps), muscle fibers, muscle spindle, sensory neuron (afferent), dorsal root ganglion, dorsal root, synapse, motor neuron, ventral horn, ventral root, efferent axon, neuromuscular junction (synapse on muscle fiber)
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