Ergonomics - KIN 142 INTRODUCTION TO ERGONOMICS ERGONOMICS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
KIN 142 INTRODUCTION TO ERGONOMICS
Background image of page 10
ERGONOMICS ERGO + NOMICS (Work) (Natural laws) The science that addresses human performance and well-being in relation to the job, equipment, tools and environment Fitting the job to the person NOT the person to the job
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
ERGONOMICS PHILOSPOHY A systems approach is taken Design from the inside out Design around human needs and capabilities and then make design decisions about the equipment, task and environment based on those needs and capabilities PERSON TASK/EQUIPMENT ENVIRONMENT
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
HISTORY OF ERGONOMICS Originated during WWII Moved to industry in 1950s Incorporated in software in 1970s Product design 1980s Currently legislation in BC, USA, Europe ISO guidelines for VDTs, software, usability,thermal comfort Marketing strategy for industrial and consumer products
Background image of page 14
CONTRIBUTING FIELDS OF KNOWLEDGE Ergonomics is multidisciplinary: PHYSIOLOGY - shift work, fatigue, work schedules PSYCHOLOGY - mental workload, training, motivation BIOMECHANICS - lifting, posture, manipulation, strength ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES - vibration, lighting, heat, cold ANTHROPOMETRY - workspace, clothing, product design SOCIOLOGY - Social groups, e.g., teams, groups, etc. BUSINESS – Industrial and organizational design ENGINEERING - Mechanical, artificial intelligence, etc. DESIGN - Graphic design, industrial design.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ergonomics at SFU Occupational Ergonomics Industrial Design Interface Evaluation
Background image of page 16
NEED FOR ERGONOMICS: INCREASED INJURIES Workplace injuries are on the rise, particularly musculoskeletal injuries 20% workers report back pain 17% workers report hand pain
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ERGONOMICS : REDUCING INJURIES Increased Occupational Health and Safety Reducing musculoskeletal disorders through design of equipment, tools, workstations and jobs. Allow worker to get close to the load Provide handles Minimize carrying distances Lifting to lowering, pulling to pushing Training Lighting
Background image of page 18
Redesign of a lifting task Liquor Distribution Board Specific concerns: Number of back injuries in the warehouse, Safe assembly production standard Objectives: to improve the physical and emotional well- being of the employed work forces by reducing mechanical stress factors within the workplace; to determine production standards that are attainable in a healthy and safe manner for the assembly task; and to educate and train Task Force members and warehouse employees in ergonomic principles and applications.
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
SUMMARY OF COSTS Injury costs $500,000/year Human error costs $200,000/year Job dissatisfaction costs $350,000/year
Background image of page 20
Assessment Process Divisions within warehouse Set up committee with: Union reps Management reps Workers from each division JOHS Equipment procurement Training Focus Groups Training System evaluation
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Checklists used to identify risks Load issues, weight, stability Posture issues Twisting Frequency Self-pacing? Noise, lighting, temperature
Background image of page 22
Image of page 23
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/01/2010 for the course KIN 142 taught by Professor Asmundson during the Spring '09 term at Simon Fraser.

Page1 / 61

Ergonomics - KIN 142 INTRODUCTION TO ERGONOMICS ERGONOMICS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 23. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online