gov exam 2 notes - October 6th lecture Enelow I. Have to...

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October 6 th lecture – Enelow I. Have to wait until 1994 for majority in Congress to shift to Republicans. How did this happen? A. Due to House elections – Redistricting i. First upheaval 1960’s – U.S. Supreme Court decision required 1 person, 1 vote. II. Reynolds v. Sims 1964 i. Prior to this decision, no requirement that districts have equal populations. ii. Some districts in Texas had 9 times the population of other districts. iii. Democratic legislatures had just kept boundaries the same – beneficial to them. iv. U.S. Supreme Court decision forced states to draw new congressional district boundaries in the 1960’s. v. Law in Texas – Legislative districts couldn’t cut across county lines. III. Representatives in Harris County, TX all ran at large. A. Barbara Jordan – elected to the 18 th District 1972. i. George H.W. Bush – elected to the 7 th District 1966. ii. Redistricting reshaped the political landscape in the South iii. Decline in rural districts, which were typically favorable to conservative Democrats. B. What starts to dislodge conservative Democrats? i. Extension of Voting Rights Act. i. Renewed 1970, 1975, 1982 and again in 2006 for 25 years. ii. 1982 – led to packing of minorities into districts enabling the election of minority iii. By packing Democrats into one district guarantees that districts around that one are heavily Republican. iv. Republicans big pushers in creating minority districts. a. Barbara Jordan’s 18 th District has been held by a black representative ever since. b. Why was the Voting Rights Act still in existence? Viewed in the South as discriminatory against the South. c. District lines were intentionally altered. i. This affects Representatives, not Senators. ii. Republicans were happy about majority minority districts. iii. Majority minority districts, death notice for moderate white Democrats. iv. Rep. Frost in Dallas – Gerrymandered out of his district. v. Texas had twelve seats in the HOR vi. 10 – minority opportunity – add black and Hispanics together. vii. All twelve were Democrats: 9 minorities (3 black, 6 Hispanic) and viii. Three white. Only one wasn’t liberal. v. Conservative Democrats gone C. 1960’s and 1970’s white Democrats building biracial coalitions D. New white Districts – Black population 15% or less and urban population of district 50% or more. E. In the Peripheral South, new white districts all in areas with black population of 15% or less and urban population 50% or more. 1
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i. Republicans had the best chance in districts comprised in this manner due to race and class. ii. By 1952 only sixteen districts fall into this area. iii. By 1966 nineteen districts. iv. If a district had a large black population, necessary to win an overwhelming majority of the white vote to make up for very small share of black vote.
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2010 for the course GOV 335N taught by Professor Karch during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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gov exam 2 notes - October 6th lecture Enelow I. Have to...

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