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Web Bibliography Model - Web bibliography I T he Internet T...

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Unformatted text preview: Web bibliography I. T he Internet T SL Journal itesl ' . or ° Has lesson plans for ESL lesson ' Large archive of articles about teaching strategies to use in the classroom. i. Contains supplements to lessons, eg powerpoints. ' Web based textbooks that teachers can use in their classrooms i. The textbooks seem like a list of lessons about other topics ii. simple English iii. guided activities, but may not be useful for introductory ESL ° Articles on the subject of teaching ESL or working with Bilingual populations. Topics cover: i. ELL children ii. Other cultures iii. General Teaching strategies iv. Specific purpose English ° Database of games posted by other ESL teachers Evaluation — A great resource for someone who has been thrust into an ESL environment. The ideas here go from the very general (How to be a better teacher), down to the nitty gritty of teaching prepositions and PowerPoints to support that. It doesn’t seem as though a lot of this website has a credited source, other than the author’s name. Some articles do have many references. It seems to be common to present a list of references that the reader may consult for further information. Not too much information about ELL content teaching. 2. ESL teacher resources — Using Englishcom a. http://www.usingenglish.com/teachershtml 2. Contents a. Numerous lesson plans, b. Handouts i. Grammar peculiarities ii. Vocabulary building iii. Function of certain words iv. A beginner and intermediate difficulty section c. A forum for ESL teachers i. Only one forum root (1. Articles by ESL professionals: i. “A well balanced use ole in your class” 1. a list of things to be aware of ii. “Rhymes and Crafts” 1. anecdotal story about using rhymes to teach English Evaluation — This website looks more professional than the first website and it is probably better organized. The forum is an incredibly useful tool, but I wish it were broken into topic forums, right now it seems like a lot of things are mashed all together. This is a great resource for teachers, but a lot of the information seems to be more geared to ESL tutors, especially those who are teaching abroad. Also, I didn’t find too much about teaching content in an ELL setting. 3. Teaching English as a Second Language A Electronic Journal a. http://tesl—ejorg 2. Contents a. Primarily articles about teaching ESL i. Scholarly articles edited by a group of professionals in the field 1. Merging a Metalinguistic Grammar Approach with L2 Academic Process Writing: ELLs in Community College 2. Web—Based Music Study: The Effects ofListening Repetition, Song Likeability, and Song Understandability on EFL Learning Perceptions and Outcomes ii. Classroom texts l. Gateway to Science: Vocabulary and Concepts b. There are also reviews of texts that could be used in the classroom Evaluation 7 A good e-j ournal that appears to be fairly reputable. Of course, the credentials of the editors would need to be examined more carefully to be sure, but it seems like a good source of scientific information. Most of the articles are available in pdf format, which is incredibly useful. The reviews link are of pdf documents, but they appear useful. 4. Dyslexia l . http:f/www.medicinenet.com/dyslexia/articlc.htm 2. Contents 1. Organized as an FAQ about dyslexia: 1. What is dyslexia? What causes dyslexia? What are the different types of dyslexia? l . Trauma 2. primary 3. secondary 4. dysgraphia What are the signs and symptoms of dyslexia? 1. Switching of symbols and numbers 2. difficulty with spatial relationships - What do parents do if they see these signs and symptoms? 1. Advises parents to get involved with the school - How is dyslexia diagnosed? l. Difficult to diagnose 2. list of many standard tests used What type of treatment is available for dyslexia? 1. There is no cure (although with secondary, it sometimes gets better with age) 2. There are many treatment strategies - Dyslexia At A Glance 1. Access to other sections of the website. which contain information pertinent to other types of conditions, not all related to school or learning. 2. The article ends with a comment board that contains mostly stories by the parents of children with dyslexia. Evaluation: This site is a great overview for someone who doesn't really know anything about dyslexia. It would be very handy if you are suddenly told that this is something you are going to have to deal with in a classroom or something you will be expected to talk about. This is primarily geared toward parents and doesn’t really include any instructional tools or advice. It is primarily a FAQ document written by doctors. 5. Why Kids Can ’1 Read ~ sponsored by the Authors of the book by the same name a. http://www.whykidscantread.com/indcx.htm 2. Companion website to the book. a. The book was written, it appears, for the parents of kids with reading difficulties and concerned citizenry i. reading failure and its lifetime effects 1. Why Do Some Children Have Difficulty Learning to Read? 2. Why is Reading a Problem? 3. What is Happening to High School Graduation Rates? 4. What Happens to High School Dropouts? ii. checklist for effective reading instruction 1. a slightly terrifyingly long list of things that the teacher ought to be doing to make sure that a student is learning to read properly. This is good, of course, but it is also worrying to think about the possibility that a student’s parent might come banging on your door if you don’t do every one of these things. iii. take action for effective reading instruction 1. Develop an alliance with the teacher Ask the right questions Talk with the principal :59?) Question the district staff Take advantage of existing structures Don’t be afraid to go to the top Arm yourself with the facts s>°.\!.©.vw Be informed 9. Focus on the bottom line Evaluation — This would be a great website to help people who are just becoming acquainted with the idea of reading difficulties. Ifa parent is looking for more information about the general phenomenon this might be a good place to send them. This is also kind of empty of strategies and seems designed more for the mainstream. The website is clearly written for parents, but it thankfully gives the very important advice of becoming allied with the teacher. It makes sense, these people are teachers after all. There isn’t too much information here, but that might be a good thing if someone is just looking for an introduction. Of course, it is also trying to sell a book so some things might need to be taken with a grain of salt. ...
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