20070928 Day Lecture 10

20070928 Day Lecture 10 - Todays Plan Welcome to CHM...

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1 Welcome to CHM 1220/1225 Please turn off cell phones pages iPods Thank you! Today’s Plan Announcements Exam I Results Chapter 10 • Pre-lecture Assignment 10 will be available at 2:00 p.m. today and is due by noon, Monday, October 1, 2007. • Chapter 10 Quiz is due by noon, Friday, October 5, 2007. • Chapter 10 Homework is due by 12:50 p.m. Friday, October 5, 2007 • Homework Assignments for Chapters 10, 5, 11, and 12 have been posted on Blackbooard under Assignments. • If you have a question about an exam question or grading, please download the Request for Exam Review form from Blackboard under Course Documents. It is due by 2:00 p.m. Friday, October 1, 2007. No requests will be accepted after that. Exam I- Score Distribution 0 20 40 60 80 100 >=1 3 5 > =1 2 0 =9 >=75 >=60 >=4 =3 Score Range Number in Range Exam I Average (474): 98.3 (65.5%) Exam I Best Questions: 8, 3, 4 Worst Questions: 1, 2 Score Distribution by Question - Exam I 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 1234567891 0 Question Score on Question
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2 Chapter 10 Molecular Geometry and Chemical Bonding Theory Molecular Geometry and Chemical Bonding Theory Molecular Geometry and Directional Bonding 1. The Valence-Shell Electron-Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Model 2. Dipole Moment and Molecular Geometry 3. Valence Bond Theory 4. Description of Multiple Bonding Molecular Orbital Theory 1. Principles of Molecular Orbital Theory 2. Electron Configurations of Diatomic Molecules of the Second Period 3. Molecular Orbitals and Delocalized Bonding In this chapter we discuss how to explain the geometries of molecules in terms of their electronic structures. We also explore two theories of chemical bonding: valence-bond theory and molecular orbital theory. We can predict the molecular geometry of a molecule, its general shape as determined by the relative positions of atomic nuclei, with a simple model: the valence-shell electron-pair repulsion model. After exploring molecular geometry, we explain chemical bonding by means of valence bond theory, which gives us insights into why bonds form and why they have definite directions in space, giving particular molecular geometries. Molecular geometry is the general shape of a molecule, as determined by the relative positions of the atomic nuclei.
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3 The valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) model predicts the shapes of molecules and ions by assuming that the valence-shell electron pairs are arranged about each atom so that electron pairs are kept as far away from one another as possible, thus minimizing electron pair repulsions.
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4 Two electron pairs are 180° apart; a linear arrangement.
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course CHM 1220 taught by Professor Barber during the Spring '07 term at Wayne State University.

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20070928 Day Lecture 10 - Todays Plan Welcome to CHM...

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