L2-signal-2009 - Signals and Systems Trac D. Tran ECE...

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1 Signals and Systems Signals and Systems Trac D. Tran ECE Department The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD 21218 Outline Outline ± Systems ± Modeling process ± Signals as inputs-outputs ± Analog and digital signals. Examples ± A simple signal model: cosine-sine wave ± Basic properties of a sine wave: period, frequency, phase, amplitude
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2 Example of Signals & Systems Example of Signals & Systems Microphone Encoder Transmitter The Telephone System input Speaker Decoder Receiver output output input Channel signals signals System and Model: Comments System and Model: Comments ± Model: simplified system that can be characterized by input-output relationship ± A system may contain many subsystems with their own inputs / outputs ± Computers and computing are common in many modern systems. Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICS) are popular in high-performance systems ± Rapid increase in computing power should be taken into account in the current design ± The design of a complex system usually involves many disciplines ± System design and study often do not require advanced mathematics and sciences
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3 Signals Signals ± System inputs and outputs ± Examples ² Our voices, music, other sounds ² Vibrations from a mechanical system ² Photographic images and video sequences ² Magnetic resonance images (MRI), x-ray images ² Electromagnetic waves from a communication system ² Electrocardiogram (ECG) from a human heart; electroencephalograph (EEG) from a human brain ² Readings from speedometers, tachometers, elevation maps ² Emails, web pages ± Usually proportional to actual natural sources, functions of time, distance, spatial location… Analog versus Digital Analog versus Digital ± Analog ± Continuous-time continuous-valued signals ± Most signals in nature are analog ± Digital ± Discrete-time discrete-valued signals ± Signals stored in computers are digital, in binary format t x(t) n x [ n ] Analog Signal Digital Signal ) ( , t x t Ζ ] [ , n x n
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course ENGINEERIN 520.101 taught by Professor Tracdtran during the Winter '06 term at Johns Hopkins.

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L2-signal-2009 - Signals and Systems Trac D. Tran ECE...

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