A_CHAPTER05 - Shaping a New Nation Americans adopt the...

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James Madison, 4th president of the United States. Shaping a New Nation Americans adopt the Articles of Confederation. A new constitution is ratified after Federalists agree to include a Bill of Rights. NEXT
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SECTION 1 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 Experimenting with Confederation Drafting the Constitution Ratifying the Constitution NEXT Shaping a New Nation
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Section 1 Experimenting with Confederation Americans adopt the Articles of Confederation but find the new government too weak to solve the nation’s problems. NEXT
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Americans Debate Republicanism Colonies Become States • People consider self-governing colonies basic political unit - colonists give their allegiance to colony - idea persists when colonies become states Experimenting with Confederation 1 SECTION Continued . . . NEXT
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Unity Through a Republic • Colonists believe democracy gives too much power to uneducated • Prefer republic —citizens rule through elected representatives • Views of republicanism , government based on consent of people: - John Dickinson: put nation’s good above self - Adam Smith and followers: pursue own interests continued Americans Debate Republicanism 1 SECTION NEXT Continued . . . Image
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State Constitutions • Many states limit powers of government leaders • Guarantee specific rights to citizens; stress liberty, not equality • Only white males can vote; in some states must own property continued Americans Debate Republicanism 1 SECTION NEXT Political Precedents • Previous republican governments cannot be adapted to U.S. needs: - none balanced concerns of state and national governments • Ancient Greece, Rome, Italian city-states did not last
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The Continental Congress Debates Representation by Population or by State? • Size, population varies; represent people or states in Congress? • Congress believes it represents states; every state gets one vote 1 SECTION NEXT Supreme Power: Can It Be Divided? Confederation or alliance: national government, states share powers Articles of Confederation —laws assigning national, state powers • National government handles war, treaties, weights, measures, mail • No executive or court system established to enforce, interpret laws Continued . . .
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2010 for the course GOVT 131 taught by Professor Kenroberts during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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A_CHAPTER05 - Shaping a New Nation Americans adopt the...

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